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Cantata BWV 44
Sie werden euch in den Bann tun euch
Discussions - Part 1

Discussions in the Week of June 4, 2000

Aryeh Oron wrote (June 5, 2000):
Background

This is the week of cantata BWV 44, according to Jane Newble's suggestion. The text of this cantata supplies the performers with many possibilities for dramatic expression - the cruelty of the first two movements (duet for Tenor & Bass and Chorus), the torment and blissfulness of the 3rd movement (Aria for Alto) the narrow and sorrowful way to heaven of the 4th movement (Chorale for Tenor), the monster and the overcome of the 5th movement (recitative for Bass), the comfort, the tempest and the sunshine of the 6th (Aria for Soprano) and the consolation of the concluding Chorale. IMHO, the picks of this cantata are - the opening Aria, which is actually a Duet for Tenor & Bass, the Chorale for Tenor, and the Aria for Alto. BWV 44 is not considered by many to be among the most attractive of the whole oeuvre of the cantatas. I think that those who approach this cantata with such prejudice will miss a lot, but I will refer to it later.

As an example to a typical attitude to this cantata, I shall use what E. Gilles Whittaker wrote in his book 'The Cantatas of Johann Sebastian Bach - Sacred & Secular'. I will refer to his introduction to the cantata and the beginning of his description of the opening duet:
"Possibly 10 years separate the two cantatas, BWV 44 and BWV 183, which bear the title 'Sie werden euch den Bann thun', and both are for the Sunday after Ascension. The earlier (BWV 44) is not among the most interesting cantatas, though it contains points worthy of attention. The Gospel is John 15: 26 - 16: 4, and the gloomy prophecy of Christ which it contains - 'They shall put you out of the Synagogues: yea, the time cometh, that whosoever killeth you will think that he doeth God a service' - is set in i. The opening clause serves for a T.B. duet with 2 oboes (fagotto e continuo is specified throughout the cantata). The music is uncompromisingly grim, Bach makes no attempt at external attractiveness, the color is never lightened, the fanatical stamping down of the bassi, through common chord, is sinister… The voices open with a stern eleven-bar cannon, borrowed from the introduction, with freely imitative oboe lines above… and merge into similar motion with the quavers of (a)…"

Personal Viewpoint

I heard 6 recordings of BWV 44. Because this cantata does not have any significant 'external attractions', I had to listen to it several times - at least 3 times to each recording - before I started to write some notes to myself for the review. It grew on me gradually with each repeated hearing, until I felt that I absorbed its spirit. I have leant to appreciate it and to love it, and I consider it now to belong to the very best. And even though this cantata has its picks, as I have mentioned earlier, I have not found in it any weak point. Rafi Lavi is a famous Israeli painter, as well as a very known classical music critic. Last week he wrote in the local newspaper named 'Ha'eer' (in Hebrew, of course. The translation is mine): "We are celebrating Bach year. And we have with what. I suggest continuing to celebrate also next year. What, 251 years to Bach's death is not a cause for celebration? For me, it could also be 316 years to his birth… on Friday program Herreweghe will conduct one of the most beautiful cantatas - BWV 8, the one with the stunning opening chorus and the semi mechanical pips in it… Another cantata, which is among the most beautiful and to say the truth, almost all of them are among the most beautiful, is BWV 44. It will be broadcasted on Sunday, also conducted by Herreweghe". I have to admit that after so many listenings to BWV 44, I do also think that it is among the most beautiful of them.

Review of the Recordings

[2] Karl Richter (1973-1975)
The words of the first two movements of this cantata have very dramatic content. On the face of it, the music that Bach wrote for those words, do not reflect the drama very strongly. The conductors of this cantata chose different approaches to emphasize the drama. Richter chose to create differences in dynamics to achieve that goal. He gets only partial success. The expression of Edith Mathis in the Soprano Aria is very convincing. Her pronunciation is very clear and she wisely finds ways to express every corner and turn of her Aria. Why do I feel that she has problems with transferring of feelings? Somehow the whole performance gives the impression of somewhat mechanical approach, which is not very exiting or convincing.

[3] Nikolaus Harnoncourt (1975)
The opening duet is balanced and clear. The voices and the instruments create very tight weave. Consequently, the cannon is very easy to follow. The drama is maintained here by the tension between the voices of the Tenor and the Bass. The singing of the choir in the second movement is simple and straight. The singing of Esswood in the Aria for Alto (No.3) is gentle and melancholic. I believe that the oboe here represents the hope and it is very touching when at the end of the Aria it is left alone. As though he is telling the Alto singer - don't lose hope. The continuo in the Chorale for tenor is very humble, and one gets the feeling that the tenor is left alone to transfer the pain and the deep sorrow. In the voice of Equiluz all the feelings of this Aria are coming out. You do not feel any need to more instruments. Meer, in the Recitative for Bass, is very successful in transferring the fear. I was reminded of the opening Recitative of Tamino in the Magic Flute (of Mozart). Meer is really excellent here. Good as the three male soloists are, the boy who sings t6he Aria for Soprano steals the show. He does not fall in any trap and passes easily every obstacle. His voice is a joy to the ear and his singing is full of naivete and optimism. This is a great performance from every aspect.

[4] Hans-Joachim Rotzsch (Mid 1970’s?)
After hearing Harnoncourt's recording, I thought that the opening duet couldn't be bettered. I was wrong. This opening duet in Rotzsch's recording has sublime beauty, the voices match marvelously with each other and the balance with the instruments is kept very naturally. This is a very warm and human rendering, more suitable to the contents, enables all the drama to come from within and not from outside effects. I found myself wanting to listen to it again and again. The voice of the female alto - Schriever is not stable enough. The slight trembling stands on her way to express herself freely and consequently her performance is not interesting enough. The voice of the tenor Menzel in the Chorale is marvelous and his singing is full of calmness and confidence. As though he wants to say 'I know that I suffer, I know where I am going to, but I do not afraid'. This is one of the cases where the interpretation adds another dimension to the words and the music, without compels itself on them. Polster, the bass singer, is authoritative and pleasant, but in his singing you do not see clearly the picture of the monster. I had the impression that the soprano Werner started her aria in low profile and that her singing is motionless. But this performance is improving along the aria. She has fresh and clear voice, but her gentle approach does not help her to hold her lines tightly as the previous sopranos did. To sum up, although the women in this recording are weaker than the men, I feel that all the soloists were carefully chosen. This is a very homogeneous rendering, very calm, restrained and convincing.

[5] Helmuth Rilling (1979)
Rilling prefers in the opening duet a faster tempo than his predecessors did. The result is a less clear performance, similar to that of Rotzsch, but much less convincing, You feel that although the singers are fine, the impatience of the conductor is disturbing them from giving a more convincing performance. But thentry of the choir in the beginning of the second movement is glorious. The alto singer Watts has very dark voice. But although she has very unique tool to her disposal, it lacks tenderness. Her singing here is a little bit superfluous. The atmosphere of this aria is transferred through the voice, rather than the deep expression. Aldo Baldin touches your heart in his Chorale. He has a very beautiful voice and to it he adds a moving singing. The approach of the Bass singer Heldwein to his Recitative is very similar to that of Meer, who performs the same part in Harnoncourt's recording. The aria for Soprano is also performed relatively fast. But here the sheer beauty of tone, the pure expression, the sincere drama conveyed by Arleen Augér - put her performance of this Aria in a class of its own. Good as the boy in Harnoncourt's recordings was, Augér is even better. Indeed, he steels the show from his partners to his Harnoncourt's recording, but not from her. Yes, this performance of this movement by Rilling is too fast to my taste, yet Augér succeeds in bringing out every hidden angle in it. The coordination between her and the accompaniment is also perfect and it sounds so true and right. I believe that it sounded too fast to my taste only because I have heard other recordings, and not because something in this performance leaves anything to be desired.

[6] Philippe Herreweghe (1993)
Herreweghe's recordings sounds chamber, gentle and humble. Regarding the beauty of playing, singing (soloists and choir), and balance between instruments and voices - this is the most beautiful recording I have heard so far. But what this performance has in beauty, it lacks in drama. This is the least dramatic of them all. And this cantata has a lot of drama in it. Just read the words and you will realize that. I remember the famous English actor Alec Guinness saying in a TV profile on him that when somebody complimented his acting in a certain play, he knew that he had to minimize his expression, because it was too obvious. I get the feeling that in the recording of BWV 44, Herreweghe guided his players and singers to avoid any external expression. The result is that the cantata lost most its blood. However, I found a beam of light. In the Aria for Soprano, I feel as if Barbara Schlick broke all the barriers, put behind her all the limits set by the conductor and consequently she sings freely, with marvelous expression and overt feeling. By doing so, she is putting herself in a very high level among the other recordings of this Aria, almost on the same level as Arleen Augér.

[8] Pieter Jan Leusink (1999)
When I heard the bitter-pungent sound of the instruments in the short instrumental opening of BWV 44, I thought that this recording is less polished than that of Herreweghe, but has more drama. The contrast between all the components of the opening duet is more evident here. Afterwards I came to conclusion that the playing and singing is not less beautiful than those of Herreweghe, but that the dramatic factor conveyed so successfully by this recordings, put it in much higher class. A bitter-pungent sound is what the words of the opening duet are calling for. Hearing Buwalda in the Aria for Alto, I realized that this Aria was composed for counter-tenor rather than for female Alto. It sounds so much truer in all the male renderings of this aria. Buwalda is a little bit insecure here and there, but some of his passages have ethereal beauty. He is very musical and intelligent. Sometimes fragile, but in his over-sensitiveness, he penetrates into the heart of this Aria much deeper than any other singer, revealing layers hidden from others (Esswood included). The tenor Schoch is also very good in his Chorale (please take notice to the charming and sensitive playing of the organ in the Continuo) and so is Ramselaar in his Recitative. The monster in his rendering is the most frightening. Ruth Holton has a very young voice, almost boyish, but she has all the experience of a mature woman. She is marvelous in revealing all the drama of her part. Her voice is very flexible, and she moves easily from one mood to another. Her voice in consistent along all the registers and her coloratura is gentle. She sounds very natural and every syllable is clearly heard. The choir is also terrific - both the boys and the men are singing cleanly with economic vibrato. Overall, this is a pure rendering, clean from preening and nonsense - very honest and exciting. The singers here are the most relaxed and they feel free to express themselves freely and naturally. They use it to go deeper, but nothing is exaggerated. This is a very satisfying performance.

Conclusion

My preferred performers:

Opening duet: Harnoncourt, Rotzsch, & Leusink
Chorus: Rotzsch, Rilling, Herreweghe, & Leusink
Aria for Alto: Buwalda and very close second – Esswood
Chorale for Tenor: Equiluz, Menzel, Baldin, Pregardien, & Schoch
Recitative for Bass: Meer, Heldwein, & Ramselaar
Aria for Soprano: Jelosits (boy) (with Harnoncourt), Augér
Chorale: Same as for the Chorus
Overall performance: Leusink first and Harnoncourt very close second
Continuo: Leusink

Ryan Michero wrote (June 5, 2000):
I'll start this one off since I am prepared and have a little time to spare...

I was not familiar with BWV 44 before this week. I was missing out, because this is a great little cantata. The drama of this piece as well as its nicely varied sequence of movements remind me of the music of the passions, especially the St. Matthew. The beginning of this cantata does in particular--the doleful opening tenor/bass duet leading without pause into an intense, angry choral movement reminds me of "So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen"/"Sind Blitze sind Donner", and the orchestral accompanied, major-key soprano aria reminds me a bit of "Ich will dir mein Herze schenken". And of course, there's the final chorale--probably the most memorable chorale tune from the St. John Passion (BWV 245). Even if the movements of this cantata aren't as inspired or ingenious as the music of the passions, BWV 44 is a fascinating and satisfying work on its own.

I have three recordings of it:

[3] Nikolaus Harnoncourt/Concentus Musicus Wien/Wiener Sangerknaben, Chorus Viennensis, Soprano - Peter Jelosits (boy), Alto - Paul Esswood, Tenor - Kurt Equiluz, Bass - Ruud van der Meer
(Teldec, recorded 1975).

[6] Philippe Herreweghe/Collegium Vocale, Soprano - Barbara Schlick, Alto - Catherine Patriasz, Tenor - Christoph Prégardien, Bass - Peter Kooy
(Harmonia Mundi France, recorded 1993).

[8] Pieter Jan Leusink/Netherlands Bach Collegium/Holland Boys Choir, Soprano - Ruth Holton, Alto - Sytse Buwalda, Tenor - Knut Schoch, Bass - Bas Ramselaar
(Brilliant Classics, recorded 1999).

[3] I was really impressed with Harnoncourt's recording--quite a contrast with his recording of BWV 86 I heard last week, which I didn't like much at all. The choir, orchestra, soloists, and conductor are all in top form, making this an inspired reading. The opening tenor/bass duet comes off very well--the combination of the appropriately tragic-sounding voices of Equiluz and van der Meer and the reedy oboes make for a lovely and moving number (although the tempo is a bit quick for my taste). The ensuing chorus is intense and powerful, with aggressive instrumental playing and impassioned singing. Harnoncourt's penchant for strong accents and sharp phrasing pays off here. The contrastingly gentle alto aria is also very well done, with Paul Esswood sounding beautiful, his voice perfectly in tune with the painful emotions of the text and enhanced by the expressive oboe playing of Jurg Shaeftlein (I assume--my notes aren't specific). Equiluz sings the middle chorale movement with much feeling, backed up sensitively by Harnoncourt's colorful continuo group. The bass recitative hits like a bolt of lightning, with dramatic singing by van der Meer and more fine work. The accompaniment of the soprano aria "Es ist und bleibt der Christen Trost" dances along beautifully, and the boy soprano Jelosits is surprisingly effective, with a lovely, secure tone and impressive vocal control. The chorale is nicely done, capping off a fine performance.

[6] Herreweghe's recording is also excellent and complements Harnoncourt's version nicely. Herreweghe's conducting puts much more emphasis on legato lines and a refined sound, yet there is no lack of drama, as the fiery choral movement proves. The choral movement is probably the highlight of this performance, featuring beautifully shaded and dramatic singing, tightly controlled conducting, and exceptionally clear contrapuntal lines. It contrasts nicely with the preceding duet, with its limpid oboe playing by the orchestra and lovely singing by Kooy and Pregardien. Oboist Marcel Ponseele is predictably sublime in the alto aria, and Catharine Patriasz's dark mezzo tone and refined singing suit the music well. The tenor chorale is nicely sung but lacks tension due to a too soft continuo group. The same goes for the bass recitative, which is much more hair-raising in Harnoncourt's version. The soprano aria is nicely joyful with Herreweghe, and Schlick does well with her part. I love the way she enunciates the words here, though her voice grates a bit in the difficult middle section of the aria. Herreweghe's performance of the final chorale movement is exceptionally beautiful, leaning on the fermatas at the end of phrases to bring out the emotions. A fine recording.

[8] I'm glad I have Leusink's recording, but it is my least favorite of the three overall. Ramselaar, Schoch, and the oboists make a fine team in the opening duet, sounding even more desperately tragic than the team in Harnoncourt's recording. Leusink draws some sharp, incisive singing from his choirs in the choral movement, making a powerful dramatic impact. I'm afraid the Achilles Heel of this recording is again countertenor Sytse Buwalda in his aria. I hate to pick on him, but he really diminishes my enjoyment of Leusink's otherwise very good recordings. Luckily he isn't given too many technical challenges here and hence doesn't grate on the ears too much. Knut Schoch sounds great in the tenor chorale, and Leusink's continuo group sounds great as well, especially the dark bassoon. The bass recitative, like Herreweghe's, lacks tension compared to Harnoncourt's version. But the real treat of this recording is for me the excellent performance of the soprano aria "Es ist und bleibt der Christen Trost", sung by Ruth Holton. Her voice is certainly delicate, even compared to the boy soprano in Harnoncourt's version. However, her vocal control is great, she is quite tonally secure (high notes aren't a problem), and her lightly wavering tone is charming. There is a great sense of innocence and joy in this version I don't really hear in any of the competitors' recordings. A nice if a bit undisciplined performance of the final chorale concludes another good recording of this cantata.

So, although all of the recordings I mention have their virtues and drawbacks, my vote for BWV 44 goes to Harnoncourt for now. Perhaps his team was just the best suited to the tone of this particular cantata? It will be interesting to hear what Koopman [7] and Suzuki do with this one.

Marie Jensen wrote (June 5, 2000):
One of the Bach cantatas with unpleasant titles...But behind the horror is always a happy ending for the faithful...

The importance and meaning of excommunications has changed a lot during history ending in the religious super market of today. The Biblical words are: "They shall put you out of the synagogues" (John 16.2). For the Catholics before Luther's reformation excommunication meant: Good bye to the Sacraments, Good bye to salvation, because only members of the Catholic Church could be saved.

But on Bach's time the "eternal disaster" aspect of getting thrown out of a congregation were gone, though consequences following ones conviction could be hard enough and lead to all kinds of persecutions... Perhaps you were fined, if you didn't go to church on Sundays. At least so it was in Denmark in the beginning of the 18th century. In the other end of the scale was for example, banishment. Burning witches, perhaps not more on Bach's time, but certainly not long ago.

But the author of BWV 44 text did not have to fear excommunication and persecutions in his mainstream Lutheranism, neither did the congregation. But perhaps it is very human and pseudo comforting to feel like a poor minority in stead of a safe majority. Everybody were Christians at least on paper- so who would pursue them? Oh yes- the devil- mentioned in the text- and unfortunately he still will.

I have listened to the cantata several times this week, and though there is certainly nothing wrong with it, I was never really caught. But reading Ryan's message where he compares it with the passions helped a lot on my appreciation of it.

For Ryan you are absolutely right saying:
"The beginning of this cantata does in particular--the doleful opening tenor/bass duet leading without pause into an intense, angry choral movement reminds me of "So ist mein Jesus nun gefangen"/"Sind Blitze sind Donner", and the orchestral accompanied, major-key soprano aria reminds me a bit of "Ich will dir mein Herze schenken". And of course, there's the final chorale--probably the most memorable chorale tune from the St. John Passion. Even if the movements of this cantata aren't as inspired or ingenious as the music of the passions, BWV 44 is a fascinating and satisfying work on its own.

As the passion aspect is the fundament of Christianity, thus it is in Bach's cantatas too. So we often find (to be a little patriotic) "an Ugly Duckling" plot. First an "Oh, It Is So Sad Aria". Everybody hates me. God has forgotten me. I'm a poor sinner, and lots and lots of troubles. Then perhaps some comforting words inevitable followed by an "Oh, I Am So Happy Aria". Jesus has saved me. Nothing shall ever separate me from Him. There is definitely nothing wrong with that. We have the same theme in BWV 12 and BWV 21 but with an individual point of view instead of BWV 44's very general one. Those two cantatas go a lot deeper IMVHO, and I prefer them. But even if I should call this cantata routine, it is not a left-hand work, and as always with JSB, the artistic level is high.

I know the cantata in two versions.

[3] Nikolaus Harnoncourt/Concentus Musicus Wien/Wiener Sangerknaben, Chorus Viennensis, Soprano - Peter Jelosits (boy), Alto - Paul Esswood, Tenor - Kurt Equiluz, Bass - Ruud van der Meer
(Teldec, recorded 1975).

[8] Pieter Jan Leusink/Netherlands Bach Collegium/Holland Boys Choir, Soprano - Ruth Holton, Alto - Sytse Buwalda, Tenor - Knut Schoch, Bass - Bas Ramselaar
(Brilliant Classics, recorded 1999).

I have promised myself not to use my boxing gloves on Buwalda this time. Instead I will praise the Leusink soprano Ruth Holton. "Es ist und bleibt der Christen trost." is the hit of BWV 44, with triumphing joy mixed with the drama of the B-part (Wetter tuermen/ Truebsal Stuermen) and lots of word painting. It is difficult to sing, and Harnoncourt's boy soprano has some problems, though he survives. Holton has a boy like voice, but the technique of a grown up, and what a difference. As Ryan I like her sense of innocence here. For example, in the l o n g word "wacht" Jesus guards with love and righteousness and not with weapons.

None of these two recordings are bad. None of them fantastic. Let us see what future will bring.

PS It seems like nobody are interested or have time to set up a discussion schedule for the rest of the year? I can do it, but I think it would be better, if it was a member, who hadn't done it before. With the "Lutheran Calendar " Aryeh and I made last month, it should not be that difficult.

Matthew Westphal wrote (June 5, ):
Thanks once again to Aryeh, Jane, Ryan and everyone else who has written about this cantata.

[6] I myself have heard only the Herreweghe -- I like it, but I don't have anything to add to what has been said already.

[8] I notice that this is the first cantata for which I have seen a Leusink recording consistently praised. Any observations about this?

Ryan Michero wrote (June 5, 2000):
Thanks to the speeding up of the list, I can reply to Marie's message shortly after she has sent it! Could this be the start of some actual "discussion" on this list?

Thanks for your insightful message, Marie. I don't know enough about either the history of Christianity or the German language, so I always learn something from your posts.

Marie Jensen wrote:
< As the passion aspect is the fundament of Christianity, thus it is in Bach's cantatas too. So we often find (to be a little patriotic) "an Ugly Duckling" plot. First an "Oh, It Is So Sad Aria". Everybody hates me. God has forgotten me. I'm a poor sinner, and lots and lots of troubles. Then perhaps some comforting words inevitable followed by an "Oh, I Am So Happy Aria". Jesus has saved me. Nothing shall ever separate me from Him. >
This is great! Yes, I've noticed this pattern in LOTS of cantatas. Very typical of the theological obsessions of the time. At least dwelling on these themes gave Bach a chance to write a wide variety of sad and happy music.

< We have the same theme in BWV 12 and BWV 21 >
I also prefer BWV 21, but I think BWV 12 and BWV 44 are at about the same level, personally. Of course, BWV 12 does have that great chorus...

[8] I'm glad you like Holton too. She's not "a mouse in cheese"!

< None of these two recordings are bad. None of them fantastic. Let us see what future will bring. >
Ah, this leads me to the point of my message: I checked the schedule for Koopman's cantata series on www.tonkoopman.nl last night and saw that BWV 44 will be included on the next volume of cantatas, Vol. 10 [7]. We won't have to wait long to hear another version then.

< PS It seems like nobody are interested or have time to set up a discussion schedule for the rest of the year? I can do it, but I think it would be better, if it was a member, who hadn't done it before. With the "Lutheran Calendar" Aryeh and I made last month, it should not be that difficult. >
Oh, I can do it! I thought you mentioned on another post that you and Aryeh were doing it, so I forgot about it. I must have misunderstood you, though. Yes, I'll try my hand at it and get back to you all.

Marie Jensen wrote (June 6, 2000):
Matthew Westphal wrote:
[8] < I notice that this is the first cantata for which I have seen a Leusink recording consistently praised. Any observations about this? >
To quote myself: I have promised myself not to use my boxing gloves on Buwalda this time.

That doesn't mean I'm satisfied. I just felt the poor man needed a break. As Ryan wrote in his BWV 86 posting: Buwalda sounds as he just came from the dentist!

Jane Newble wrote (June 8, 2000):
Since coming back from holiday I have resisted the temptation to read what you have all written about BWV 44, so that I could just write my own feelings about it first.

I only have two versions of it - Leusink [8] and Herreweghe [6], and I listened to Leusink first. My immediate impression was that Bach must have had an off-day, when he wrote this. And then I thought of the poor singers. It sounds like a very difficult cantata to sing. There is no "tune" to hold on to, and it all sounds rather depressive. Then I thought that perhaps it was the way Leusink interpreted it, so I listened to Herreweghe. Although Herreweghe is of course 'perfect', I felt he was losing out on the feeling. So then I decided to look into what it was written for, and why, and what the words actually said. And I was very impressed (as so often) with Bach's genius for pitching the mood exactly right. The mood of the disciples of Christ the Sunday after Ascension, with the dubious promise of suffering the same fate of rejection by the world as their master. In Luke's gospel it says that they returned to Jerusalem with great joy, but all the same, they now had to face the future, and it was not necessarily a rosy one. Not surprising they probably felt somewhat worried.

Pentecost had not happened yet, and there must have been a feeling of "having to go it alone".

So after listening several times I feel an enormous admiration for Bach, and the way he rose above his time in writing this dramatic, almost modern sounding music.

Now I shall read your postings and probably wish I had not sent this!

Harry J. Steinman wrote (June 9, 2000):
Sometimes I follow the weekly reviews carefully and sometimes I don't. I didn't pay much attention to BWV 44 (just a busy week!) and I noticed Jane's reaction/review and I decided to look, and lo! And behold! I had the Leusink's BWV 44 [8]. Just listened to it a few times and I really like it! And that got me listening to more of the Brilliant Classics volume and I do like that too! (Gotta agree about Buwalda, though...the alto recitatives are especially tough for me).

Anyway, as a lurker, I gotta say that I'm really glad that Aryeh and Ryan and Marie and Jane and Stephen and Kirk and really everybody keeps writing...y'all DO get read and taken seriously. The cantata section of my JSB collection is the fastest-growing of 'em all...

 

Continue on Part 2

Cantata BWV 44: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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