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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Cantata BWV 73
Herr, wie du willt, so schick's mit mir
Discussions - Part 3

Continue from Part 2

Discussions in the Week of January 10, 2010

Jens F. Laurson wrote (January 10, 2010):
Intro to BWV 73

Dear All, if this formatting (I was using the Rich Text Editor) does not come through and make a grotesque mess of the text, I have uploaded the same as a .pdf file as well, which may aid your reading-ease:
http://www.weta.org/fmblog/wp-content/uploads/2009/12/BACH-Cantatas-Discussion-73.pdf

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About myself: I am a lay-Bachian, drawn to Bach out of sheer enthusiasm and a vague inner need for something that supplies me with a balanced answer to that `oceanic feeling' (Romain Rolland). I am not a musicologist, musician, or even music-amateur; with these `introductions' I dabble based on instinct, hoping that where I lack qualifications I might be able to cover for that fact with an ability to form over long sentences. In my time in the world's oldest continuously operating boys choir (I have no idea if that is true, but going back to 975, chances should be pretty good it is) I never had the pleasure of singing Bach. Rheinberger, yes,which was great. But never Bach. I wonder if I would have become a better person, had I. When the occasion merits, I write about classical music. http://weta.org/fmblog/

Herr, wie duwill(s)t, so schick's mit mir BWV 73

Written for the 3rd Sunday after Epiphany
First performance January 23rd, 1724
(Bach's first year of Cantata-duties atthe Thomas Church in Leipzig.)

1. Chorus & Recitative (tenor, bass,soprano): "Herr, wie du willt, so schick's mit mir"
2. Aria (tenor): "Ach senke doch den Geist"
3. Recitative (bass): "Ach, unser Wille"
4. Aria (bass): "Herr, so du willt"
5. Choral: "Das ist des Vaters Wille"

Liturgy:

Church readings for that day are from Romans 12: 17-21 on Love and from Matthew 8: 1-13 (The Man with Leprosy / The Faith of the Centurion.) I have never bothered looking these texts up before today, but I would never pretend that my understanding of the Cantata has not been limited by my omission. After all, treating Bach from a merely musical, and not his religious side, would be akin to Napoleon only as a military man, not a politician. Which is to say: Highly fascinating and material enough for more than a life-time's pursuit of knowledge and detail. Just not the whole picture. For those interested, the pertinent liturgical texts are quoted here in toto.

Romans 12: 17-21
17 Do not repay anyone evilfor evil. Be careful to do what is right in the eyes of everybody.
18 If it is possible, as faras it depends on you, live at peace with everyone.
19 Do not take revenge, myfriends, but leave room for God's wrath, for it is written: "It is mine toavenge; I will repay,"says the Lord.
20 On the contrary: "Ifyour enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink. In doing this, you will heap burning coals on his head."
21 Do not be overcome byevil, but overcome evil with good.

Matthew 8: 1-13
The Man With Leprosy
1 When he came down fromthe mountainside, large crowds followed him.
2 A man with leprosy came and knelt before him andsaid, "Lord, if you are willing, you can make me clean."
3 Jesus reachedout his hand and touched the man. "I am willing," he said. "Beclean!" Immediately he was cured of his leprosy.
4 Then Jesus said to him, "See that you don't tell anyone. But go, show yourselfto the priest and offer the gift Moses commanded, as a testimony to them."

The Faith of the Centurion
5 When Jesus had enteredCapernaum, a centurion came to him, asking for help.
6 "Lord," he said,"my servant lies at home paralyzed and in terrible suffering."
7 Jesus said tohim, "I will go and heal him."
8 The centurionreplied, "Lord, I do not deserve to have you come under my roof. But justsay the word, and my servant will be healed.
9 For I myself am a man under authority, with soldiers underme. I tell this one, 'Go,' and he goes; and that one, 'Come,' and he comes. Isay to my servant, 'Do this,' and he does it."
10 When Jesus heard this, he wasastonished and said to those following him, "I tell you the truth, I havenot found anyone in Israel with such great faith.
11 I say to you that many willcome from the east and the west, and will take their places at the feast withAbraham, Isaac and Jacob in the kingdom of heaven.
12 But the subjects of thekingdom will be thrown outside, into the darkness, where there will be weepingand
gnashing of teeth."
13 Then Jesus said to thecenturion, "Go! It will be done just as you believed it would." Andhis servant was healed at that very hour.

The word-cobbler who put the above into the poem form that makes up most of the text for BWV 73 is unknown.

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Mvt. 1: Chorus & Recitative (tenor, bass, soprano): "Herr, wie du willt, so schick's mit mir"

"Herr, wie du willt" ("Lord, as you wish") is introduced as a memorable musical phrase that repeatedly pops up in purely instrumental form-a permanent, trumpet-reinforced, reminder that stands behind every utterance of that chorus and pseudo-recitative. Bach, ever didactic, is vigorously "on message" throughout the entire opening of the cantata.

If you are religiously intoned, musically sensitive, and enough a stickler for details, you might even pick out the last "Herr, wie du willt" featuring a dissonance that-apparently-is Bach's reminder that the Lord's ways are sometimes quite impenetrable.

I can't help but wonder how subtle or obvious such musico-liturgical symbolism was back then to the laity or even the musically inclined clergy. Were they slapping their knees and nodding at each other in immediate cogniscance - or did it go over their head as much as mine?

The oboe enjoys the limelight in this movement, bubbling along and moving into the second movement as the accompaniment to the:

Mvt. 2: Aria (tenor): "Ach senke doch den Geist"

where it is the sole instrument above the basso continuo, engaging the tenor in a dialog on pleading for some joyous spirit to keep the subject from waning from the path of hopefulness.

Mvt. 3: Recitative (bass): "Ach, unser Wille" & Mvt. 4: Aria (bass): "Herr, so du willt"

A very brief secco rezitativo leads tothe bass aria at the center of which is the repetition (16 times) of "Herr, sodu willt".

Mvt. 5: Chorale: "Das ist des Vaters Wille"

The short finale chorale again exhorts the creative importance of God's will and how being instrumentsof it will lead us his kingdom. all in a strophe taken from a chorale by Ludwig Helmbold that happens to well fit the subject matter. A brief cantata with nomovement much (or at all) exceeding four minutes, the whole thing is done within about 13 to 15 minutes.

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A selection of recordings:

BWV 73 is not one of the `greatest hits' cantatas and rarely features outside (variously) comprehensive cantata surveys.Given that, Phillip Herreweghe's recording [4] might be notable, since he allows himself to be guided by nothing but personal preference in his choice of recorded cantatas.

Suzuki, BIS, vol.17 [8]: Amazon.com, (AnniversaryEdition No.2: Amazon.com)
Kuijken,Accent SACD, vol.8 [9]: Amazon.com
Koopman, Challenge, vol.10 [5]: Amazon.com
Rilling, Hänsler, vol.23 [2]: Amazon.com
Herreweghe,Virgin, oop / mp3 [4]: Amazon.com
Gardiner, Archiv, oop / mp3 [6]: Amazon.com

Complete discography at www.bach-cantatas.com
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV73.htm


Comments on recordings:

The way Kuijken's singers [9] (are recorded ads so much to the choruses' presence that compared to a small vocal groups used by the other conductors (save Suzuki [8]) there is no forsaking thrust, only trading homogeneity for the grosgrain texture and detail of OVPP at its best.

It's an extraordinary buoyant opening, the way Kuijken's La Petite Band [9] accentuate the recurring "Herr, wie Du willt"; belying the relative unpopularity of the cantata. Christoph Genz, in his completely unmannered way, is my favorite tenor to perform this aria.

Apart from Kuijken [9], who I have on hand, my comments on the other versions I know are from memory: Gardiner's [6] opening sounds positively big-band, compared to his colleagues, and he rushes Julian Podger though his aria as if to test his agility. (Podger passes with flying colors.) Herreweghe [4] has a wonderfully spacious recording; less dense and immediate than the so-direct-asto-border-being-pushy Kuijken [9]. "Never the best in any one cantata, always among the most enjoyable" would be my summary of the Koopman cycle [5]. That's my BWV 73 memory, too. Lots of meat on those Bach bones (for a "FewVPP" performance), Caroline Stam, Paul Agnew, and Klaus Mertens in very good shape.


P.S.
I can't put my finger on it; but somethingstrikes me as odd the opening chorus, lovely as I might find it. As if something foreign had taken root in Bach and flavored the result in an unusual way.

Neil Halliday wrote (January 10, 2010):
Jens F. Laurson wrote:
>I can't put my finger on it; but something strikes me as odd in the opening chorus, lovely as I might find it. As ifsomething foreign had taken root in Bach and flavored the result in an unusual way.<
Thanks to Jens for the intro.

This cantata certainly reveals Bach as innovator, and this unusual movement (not part of the Jahrgang II chorale cantata cycle - as I read somewhere) is an example. See Graig Smith's commentary:
http://www.emmanuelmusic.org/notes_translations/notes_cantata/n_bwv073.htm
(also available via the link from the BCW)

The frequent short ritornellos in the first movement (Mvt. 1) are un-accompanied by continuo except during statements of a prominent, horn-reinforced leit-motiv (and toward the end of the opening ritornello where a quote of the closing chorale phrase is heard on the horn). The insertion of accompanied recitative with constant reminders of the leitmotiv on the horn, between the SATB chorale phrases and ritornellos, produces a movement that is quite dramatic in effect, especially if a relaxation of the rhythmic pulse is allowed in these recitative sections (as in Rilling).

Four recordings (apart from the pre-stereo Ramin) use the wonderful colour and spaciousness that the horn timbre brings to this movement: Rilling [2], Koopman [5], Suzuki [8] and Kuijken [9]. However, the last is understated, with the instrument sounding more like a cornetto, perhaps. Overall, Suzuki's moderate pace and spacious performance make his possibly the most arresting performance, "except" that the horn player does not seem to be able avoid "splattering" the notes of the 4-note leit-motiv.!

The other unique movement in this cantata is the bass aria (Mvt. 4), in which three quite distinct sections are each separated by the wondefully consoling music which begins, intersperses, and closes the aria.

Consolation is certainly required; the horror of death is made explicit in the text (given here in the German word order):

[Each of the three sections is introduced by three statements of "Lord, as you will", set to the consoling music mentioned above]

1st section. "So press, you death-pains, the sighing out of my heart". The vocal line suddenly breaks up, and seemingly changes from triple to duple time, afterwards returning to the consoling music with "when my praying only before you is valued"

[Again, "Lord as you will" three times, set to consoling music]

2nd section. "So lay my limbs in dust and ashes down, this most corrupted sin-image (ie, the body).

Here the music suddenly tellingly plunges into the remote key of Bb minor (on "dust and ashes under").

An exotic canon with 'eastern harmonies' on the violins leads us back to an Ab major setting of the "consoling" music, setting the stage for the 3rd section:

"So strike, you funeral bells, I follow unafraid, my suffering is now more (ie, from now on) stilled".

This features a lovely pizzicato string section in major-key harmonies (A flat), as befits the text.
With the words "So stike, you funeral bells" (sung twice), the vocal line once again appears as if in duple time, returning to triple time with " I follow unafraid" etc.

The funeral bells (pizzicato chords) end their tolling in utter peace (in Ab major), whereupon the vocalist effortlessly brings us back to the consoling music in the minor key. Rachmaninov himself would have learnt from the rich string counterpoint in this deeply moving final section (recall the the amazingly consoling strings in the slow movement of the 2nd symphony).

(I wish Herreweghe [4] would instruct his violinists to 'lay into the music' a bit more in the final ritornello;
their parts are after all marked 'forte', but they seem to carry on 'daintily', as if afraid to express too much emotion. However, the viola line does sing beautifully, in his recording).

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 10, 2010):
Neil Halliday wrote: :
< The frequent short ritornellos in the first movement (Mvt. 1) are un-accompanied by continuo except during statements of a prominent, horn-reinforced leit-motiv (and toward the end of the opening ritornello where a quote of the closing chorale phrase is heard on the horn). >
All of the recordings use a horn, but there is an "ossia" option for the melody to be played on the Rückpositiv division of the organ. The "back-" was a portion of the organ which was perched on the balustrade behind the back of the organist as he sat at the console. The division was small but contained some very colourful stops which were used to highlight solo lines. This is one of the very few indications of organ registration in the cantatas. Its forward position on the railing meant that it could be heard prominently, and thus an adequate replacement for the horn.

The Rückpositiv can be seen quite clearly on the balustrade in this photo: Photo
The main console is hidden behind it.

Jens F. Laurson wrote (January 10, 2010):
Intro to BWV 73 -- Where's the Horn?

Douglas Cowling wrote:
< All of the recordings use a horn.. >
I'm sorry, but in Kuijken, the tromba I hear is a Slide Trumpet (Zugtrompete), not a horn. Are we talking cross purposes, am I confused, or does Kuijken stand out from the rest in that regard?

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 10, 2010):
Jens F. Laurson wrote:
< I'm sorry, but in Kuijken, the tromba I hear is a Slide Trumpet (Zugtrompete), not a horn >
Sorry. I was looking at the score and had "corno" in my mind. There seem to be a variety of brass instruments used, from French horn to cornetti and tirasi.

Evan Cortens wrote (January 10, 2010):
[To Douglas Cowling] Bach's instrument designations are notoriously fraught. The best book on this subject, and a must-have for anyone seriously interested in it is Ulrich Prinz's Johann Sebastian Bachs Instrumentarium (Barenreiter, 2005). If you're local library doesn't have it, ask them to order it!

A WorldCat link: http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/58421217

Suffice it to say, with brass instruments especially, though winds and strings occasionally as well, it can be near impossible to determine what instrument Bach actually used. Conductors must usually make an educated guess, and thats why they so often end up coming to different conclusions.

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 10, 2010):
Jens F. Laurson wrote:
< Gardiner, Archiv, oop / mp3 [6]: Amazon.com >
The Gardiner CD which includes BWV 73 is worth a bit of discographic emphasis. It is one of the few released by DG Archiv which are actually from the 2000 Pilgramage series (Milan, Jan. 22-24). As best I can tell, it is not scheduled for reissue in Gardiners SDG label, the ongoing series due for completion this year (2010). Not surprisingly, DG has not had the courtesy to keep this item in print.

The final page of the booklet notes is headed <Bach Cantata Pilgrimage>, but it is in fact a mixture of a few CDs recorded in concert in 2000, and others recorded during the 1990s, a total of eleven listed. That is all of them (I believe), released with deceptively similar packaging and labeling (or mis-labeling, for the non-pilgrimage recordings).

I will make an attempt to update release info from SDG for tidying up any loose ends as the series approaches completion. I know others are interested in these details as well, perhaps someone already has additional info and can post it, as to whether the earlier DG releases will ultimately be reissued, making the pilgrimage available complete on SDG?

Paul Johnson wrote (January 10, 2010):
[To Ed Myskowski] I don't think the DG pilgrimage releases will ever be released on SDG. Gardiner has included in the SDG releases some of the cantatas released by DG, but only the ones recorded prior to 2000.

As I'm sure you know, DG originally committed to releasing all of the pilgrimage but quickly 'bottled it' and, instead, released twelve CDs that were largely made up of reissues and previous recordings. Not that they aren't good - the coupling of BWV 140 and BWV 147 is a classic. But what a shame they are deleted (I hadn't realized that). But the pilgrimage cantatas they own will now sit in the can until they think of an ugly packaged boxset to release.

Good news that the new Gardiner set will complete this year. I have found subscribing to it a joy and will miss them arriving in the post.

VDMA1580 wrote (January 11, 2010):
I was just this very day going through my Bach Cantata recordings, and making sure I had all of Gardiner. Indeed, I have kept up and am current. Some of you indicated the series would be completed this year.

Will it go higher than Vol 27?

And if not, does this mean what remains is Vols. 2, 11, 12 and 18?

Paul Johnson wrote (January 11, 2010):
[To VDMA1580] it won't go above 27, which means there are only those 4 left.

see: http://www.solideogloria.co.uk/resources/sdg_cantatas_index.pdf

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 11, 2010):
Paul Johnson wrote:
< I don't think the DG pilgrimage releases will ever be released on SDG. Gardiner has included in the SDG releases some of the cantatas released by DG, but only the ones recorded prior to 2000. >
I do not have the specific works readily at hand, but my recollection is that there has already been (or perhaps only planned?) minor overlap between actual pilgrimage releases by DG Archiv, and subsequent releases by Gardiner on SDG. I have it on my to do list to track this detail down. It would be a great favor if anyone has the info to save me the trouble (small, but tedious).

PJ:
< As I'm sure you know, DG originally committed to releasing all of the pilgrimage but quickly 'bottled it' and, instead, released twelve CDs >
Thanks for noticing and gently correcting my statement of eleven. Once again, a somewhat tedious, but ultimately important detail for accuracy: what is the twelfth release? Here are the eleven included in booklet notes with BWV 73. I have seven of these, including (I hope!) all essential for pilgrimage completeness:

Easter: BWV 6, BWV 66.
Actus Tragicus: BWV 106, BWV 118/231
Epiphany 3: BWV 72, BWV 73, BWV 111, 156 (pilgrimage, Jan. 22-24))
Ascension: BWV 34/249b, BWV 37, BWV 43, BWV 128
Whitsun (Pentecost): BWV 34, BWV 59 & BWV 74 [sic], 172
Feast of the Purification of Mary (occasion omitted in DG list): BWV 82, BWV 83, BWV 125, BWV 200 (pilgrimage, Feb [undpecified dates])

At this point in writing the compilation, I realized that the booklet notes to this CD (Purification) have all twelve DG releases, as noted by Paul. Might as well carry on.

[occasion omitted in DG notes]: BWV 16, BWV 98, BWV 139
[ditto]: BWV 140, BWV 147 [I do not have this, Paul is enthusiastic]
[ditto]: BWV 36, BWV 61, BWV 62 [sic]
Christmas: BWV 63, BWV 64, BWV 121, BWV 133
Trinity 9: BWV 94, BWV 168, BWV 105 (pilgrimage, Aug [unspecified dates])
Trinity 11: BWV 179, BWV 199, BWV 113.

The four DG recordings needed for a complete documntation of the pilgrimage are: Purification, Epiphany 3 [including BWV 73, the current thread], Trinity 9, and 11.

Enough for now. Thanks to Paul and others for sharing listening enjoyment (not to mention the fine delivery service to subscribers!)re the Gardiner releases. You cannot keep a good man down. Even an aggravating good man. Gardiner, that is.

Eds Myskowski wrote (January 11, 2010):
Bach on radio (BWV 73)

Over the past year (2009), I have been listening and posting more or less weekly, re the liturgically related Sunday AM Bach cantata broadcasts in Boston, available also via internet streams. That was the current state of an ongoing 37 year tradition. It is now moved to Sunday PM, and a different FM frequency and internet address. Coming up in about an hour at 8:00 PM EST (1300 UT) at 99.5 FM, www.995allclassical.org. I believe the work will the XO cantata for Epiphany, but I have missed the recent weeks due to holiday stuff, and may be off a bit.

I will continue to post brief notices, as appropriate. For those who may enjoy listening, positive feedback to the broadcasterwill likely help the continuation of the Sunday cantata tradition on radio in Boston. This morning, as an AM replacement, I listened to a CD of BWV 73 (Kuijken) to start the day, then dug through the archives (piles and shelves) to recover the Gardiner for comparison, next got wrapped up (copped a bad rap?) when I realized that Gardiner is in fact a pilgrimage recording, released on DG. Discographic complexities posted seperately, listening thoughts to come.

On the positive side of corporate decisions, there was a feature about Manhattan Transfer (jazz vocal group, with ample polyphony/counterpoint), on the TV show Sunday Morning today. The music lead was <Operator (Get Me Jusus, On the Line)>, which Doug and I shared some public (I hope I recall that correctly!) chat on, a while back. As concisely as possible:
(1) The original (recorded) version of Operator was by The Friendly Bros., ca 1957, on VeeJay. I was around and listening, but alas, do not recall hearing it.
(2) Ahmet Ertegun, founder (with his brother) of Atlantic Records, did hear it and noted the tune as having legs (hit potential)
(3) The first time Ahmet heard MT, he signed them on the spot (ca. 1978), and immediately suggested they record <Operator>. This was about twenty years later, and Atlantic was by then a corporate giant, as record companies go. It was a commercial hit for MT, and took their career (ongoing success in 2010) to a new level.
(4) Ahmet Ertegun (occasionally backwards as Nugetre, as a song writer, I believe) is a legend and hero to all Bach fans who also love American music, including its influence on British pop.

There is something sweet and Bachish about Turkish brothers being the backbone of American music recording history. Now if we could just get a Papist pair to complete the symmetry. I hear those snake-like riffs already.

Glen Armstrong wrote (January 11, 2010):
[To Ed Myskowski, rgarding Bach on radio] Thanks to your promptings, I have been listening to McCreath's Bach cantatas fairly regularly. This a.m. I saw, "The Bach Hour" listed, and heard the unaccompanied flute plus Hewitt with partitas, but missed the 6th part of XO. Now, thanks to you, I'm hearing the partitas again and hoping I can stay awake for the Oratorio/Cantata. Rather surprising that I could hear it this morning when it is billed for the evening.

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 11, 2010):
Glen Armstrong wrote to Ed Myskowski:
< Thanks to your promptings, I have been listening to McCreath's Bach cantatas fairly >regularly. This a.m. I saw, "The Bach Hour" listed, and heard the unaccompanied flute plus Hewitt with partitas, but missed the 6th part of XO. Now, thanks to you, I'm hearing the partitas again and hoping I can stay awake for the Oratorio/Cantata. Rather surprising that I could hear it this morning when it is billed for the evening. >
The format change is a challenge for all of us who are old enough to have been listening live at 8 AM Sunday. I cannot help with details of the new internet access, as I do not have it readily available. Although I try to appear hip, I just tune in to the radio. I believe it is available as a link anytime during the day.

In general, I gather you were able to get the flavor of The Bach Hour for Sunday evenings: a Bach Cantata, liturgically related for the day, with comments to relate the text to music, and a link to translation. Since the show is based in Boston, the Pamela Dellal translation for Emmanuel Music (English 6 on BCW) is the choice. My resolution for 2010 is to compare the translations by Pamela with those of Francis (France is prone) Browne. A resolution I consider penitential, perhaps purgatorial.

Surrounding the cantata, filling out the Bach hour, instrumental music illustrating Bachs contrapuntal skills (at the keyboard, from initial listenings). The Bach Hour format is a new idea, in process, as I understand. I expect Brian McCreath would appreciate helpful input. Last I knew, he was a BCML reader, and in any case, easy of access in my experience.

Re the Angela Hewitt: what I heard was a few Preludes and Fugues from WTC II, from a recent recording on piano: her second time around. She came off a tour of playing the music in concert, with a lot of new insights into delicacy, combined with momentum. [I nearly wrote forward momentum; backward momentum sprung to mind] I found the piano playing and presentation to be an effective combo. If I did not have so many records, I would rush out to buy it. I may do so anyway.

I am looking forward to discussing cantatas for Epiphany 3 in the coming weeks. All available by Gardiner/Monteverdi Choir on a single CD (concert performance, 2000 pilgramage), for those astute enough to buy the DG Archiv release at some time in the past ten years.

Paul Johnson wrote (January 11, 2010):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< next got wrapped up (copped a bad rap?) when I realized that Gardiner is in fact a pilgrimage recording >
Ah-ha! So, if BWV 73 is a pilgrimage recording, then their will be some minor cross over. I hadn't noticed this. Thanks Ed. I'm currently away from hope so can't look at my own CDs. I now want to see if there is in fact any other duplication. Thanks for sharing your enjoyment of the Gardiner releases.

Paul Johnson wrote (January 11, 2010):
[To Ed Myskowski] Ed - just a thought: do you have the pilgrimage DVD which contains the BBC documentary? The DVD also replicates the contents of one of the DG CDs, and contains the brilliant performance of BWV 199 by Kozena.

Paul (currently listening to BWV 32, 124, and 154, to catch up from yesterday).

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 11, 2010):
Paul Johnson wrote:
< do you have the pilgrimage DVD which contains the BBC documentary? The DVD also replicates the contents of one of the DG CDs, and contains the brilliant performance of BWV 199 by Kozena. >
I do not have it, add it to the wish list. I was just thinking the other year to get more involved with DVDs, when I discovered the Met Opera live HD transmission to theaters. Very close to live concert ambience, and makes my living room feel just a bit obsolete.

Note that the Obrecht CD Kim mentioned the other day is a CD/DVD combo, for about the price of a CD alone.

Paul Johnson wrote (January 11, 2010):
[To Ed Myskowski] For those interested in the Gardiner pilgrimage then the BBC documentary on this DVD is great viewing. It brings the endevour to life and shows some of the conditions under which performances are conceived and executed (for many of you, I know this is the bread and butter of everyday life).

 

Cantata BWV 73: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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