Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

Instrumental Works: Recordings, Reviews & Discussions - Main Page | Order of Discussion
Recording Reviews of Instrumental Works: Main Page | Organ | Keyboard | Solo Instrumental | Chamber | Orchestral, MO, AOF
Performers of Instrumental Works: Main Page | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Burkard Schliessmann
Bach's Instrumental Works

Contents

Recordings of Solo Keyboard Works
Recordings of Chamber Works
Recordings of Orchestral Works
Recordings of Arrangements & Transcriptions
Recordings of Vocal Works

Burkard Schliessmann - Short Biography

Reviews of the recording of Goldberg Variations BWV 988 by Burkard Schliessmann

Recordings

Recordings of Solo Keyboard Works

K-1

Bach: Goldberg Variations

Goldberg Variations BWV 988

Burkard Schliessmann (Piano)

Bayer Records 100326

Jul 17-19, 2007

2-SACD / TT: 83:06

Recorded at Teldex Studio, Berlin, Germany.
Reviews of the recording of Goldberg Variations BWV 988 by Burkard Schliessmann
Buy this album at:
CD: Amazon.com | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de

K-2

Chopin-Schumann 2010: Anniversary Edition

Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826 [22:10]

Burkard Schliessmann (Piano)

MSR Classics 1361

Mar 15-18, 2010

2-SACD / TT: 123:38

Recorded at Funkhaus Berlin, Germany.
Buy this album at:
2-SACD: Amazon.com | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de

K-3

J.S. Bach: Italian Concerto; Partita No. 2; Fantasias and Fugues

 

Partita No. 2 in C minor, BWV 826 [22.03]*
Italian Concerto in F major, BWV 971 [12:24]*
Fantasia & Fugue in A minor, BWV 904 [7:55]**
Fantasia, Adagio (in G major, BWV 968) & Fugue in C minor, BWV 906 [11:16]**
Chromatic Fantasia & Fugue in D minor, BWV 903 [12:19]*

Burkard Schliessmann (Piano) [Piano: Steinway & Sons, D-274, # 588.201, property of Burkard Schliessmann; Technical Handling / Tuning / Intonation: Georges Ammann, Steinway & Sons]

Divine Art DDC-25751

*Aug 14, 2012
**Apr 23, 2013

SACD / TT: 65:58

Recorded at Teldex-Studios Berlin, Germany.
Recording Producers: Friedemann Engelbrecht, Tobias Lehmann; Sound Engineer: Julian Schwenkner; Editing: Julian Schwenkner.
One of the masterpieces from Bach’s years of maturity is the Fantasia in C minor BWV 906 that was written towards the end of the 1730s. Here Bach explores the world of Neapolitan keyboard music created by Alessandro and Domenico Scarlatti, one of the principal effects of which was the crossing of the performer’s hands. Succinct in terms of its motivic and thematic writing and filled with a sense of intense motoric urgency, the Fantasia reflects its composer’s engagement with Classical sonata form. The first subject-group is followed by a much calmer episode that serves as a second subject, while the development section gives way to a foreshortened recapitulation. It is regrettable that the ensuing fugue remained unfinished – or at least it has come down to us in only an incomplete form. Wholly unique, it is cast, rather, in the form of a fantasia and sets out to explore a world of such unprecedented novelty that we might be forgiven for thinking that this was an experimental study rather than a piece intended for publication: note, in particular, the bold chromatic progressions and examples of contrary motion, to say nothing of the work’s audacious harmonic writing. Whereas the first part of the fugue is unquestionably by Bach, the authorship of the second, more diffuse, section is uncertain. Ferruccio Busoni completed the fugue, extending its original forty-seven bars to ninety-six with a display of contrapuntal mastery. In order to achieve the inner cohesion of a three-movement sonata-like work, he also interpolated between the Fantasia and Fugue the Adagio in G major BWV 968 that Bach himself had arranged from his Third Sonata for unaccompanied violin BWV 1005. The source of this arrangement is an autograph manuscript by Johann Christoph Altnickol headed "SONATA per il CEMBALO Solo del Sigre J. S. Bach", although, stylistically speaking, the arrangement tends, rather, to point in the direction of the generation of Bach’s sons, notably Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. But it is possible that the arranger was Altnickol himself. Whatever the answer, the arrangement is a fine example of the way in which a violin piece could be adapted for a keyboard of the time. The low register of the writing may be due to the fact that the following movements of the violin sonata were also intended to be transcribed without violating their melodic line, but it may also be an argument in favour of the use of a particular instrument such as a lute-harpsichord.
© Burkard Schliessmann

 

The list of recordings was compiled by Aryeh Oron (May 2008 - October 2014)

Burkard Schliessmann: Short Biography | Recordings of Instrumental Works

Instrumental Works: Recordings, Reviews & Discussions - Main Page | Order of Discussion
Recording Reviews of Instrumental Works: Main Page | Organ | Keyboard | Solo Instrumental | Chamber | Orchestral, MO, AOF
Performers of Instrumental Works: Main Page | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
Chorale Texts | Chorale Melodies | Lutheran Church Year | Readings | Poets & Composers | Arrangements & Transcriptions
Search Website | Search Works/Movements | Terms & Abbreviations | Copyright | How to contribute | Sitemap | Links



 

Back to the Top


Last update: ýOctober 20, 2014 ý23:07:44