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Johann Friedrich Fasch & Bach

Fasch music samples uploaded

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 22, 2008):
Aryeh has uploaded some sample files of Johann Friedrich Fasch. This is the Concerto for 3 Wind Choirs (each choir has 3 Trumpets, Timpani, 3 Oboes, and Bassoon). It apparently was composed for celebrations for the wedding of Catherine of Zerbst to the Czar of Russia in 1745, she would go on to become famous as "Catherine the Great." This music was played during an fireworks display along with a serenata (that unfortunately is lost). I love to refer to this as "the OTHER" royal fireworks music ;)
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Mus/Fasch-Mus.htm

Thanks to Aryeh for uploading these for our enjoyment,

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (May 22, 2008):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Aryeh has uploaded some sample files of Johann Friedrich Fasch. >
Just before their Philadelphia concert last week the group Tempestà di mare was interviewed on local radio. Their concert (in conjunction with a CD, as I believe) was called Fres(c)h Fasch. They are on a mission to find and resurrect Fasch inter alios. They find him a step to Haydn and away from Bach to simplify what was an interesting interview.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 22, 2008):
Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote:
< Just before their Philadelphia concert last week the group Tempestà di mare was interviewed on local radio. Their concert (in conjunction with a CD, as I believe) was called Fres(c)h Fasch. >
Yes! Richard Stone is the co-director. The CD was based on a concert over a year ago. The concert this season features new works that will be recorded on a follow-up disc.

< They are on a mission to find and resurrect Fasch inter alios. They find him a step to Haydn and away from Bach to simplify what was an interesting interview. >
Yes, the co-directors are quite capitivated with Fasch; and rightfully so, I believe. My publisher Brian Clark edited the Fasch pieces you heard at the concert and on the CD. Brian is working from manuscripts in Dresden that suffered horribily during WW2. The contents of the libaries were removed to underground vaults deep under the city- but the percussive bombs cracked the ceilings and water damaged most everything. The Fasch manuscripts have essentially no stave lines on the manuscripts. It's got to be an incredible achievement to rescue
music like Fasch's from oblivion.

Ed Myskowski wrote (May 22, 2008):
>They find him [Fasch] a step to Haydn and away from Bach to simplify what was an interesting interview.<
We would do well not to overlook CPE Bach at that juncture. Plenty of good music, in the family!

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (May 22, 2008):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] As I recall, they said that Fasch used much cheaper ink for the stave lines and far better ink for the notes and thus in these vaults the notes survived.
sic transit...

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 22, 2008):
[To Yoël L. Arbeitman] Makes sense-- the stave lines are lighter (or more gray) than the note ink to make it easier to read the music. But I pity whoever had the job of rastering the blank paper with staves; what a bore that had to have been.

Ed Myskowski wrote (May 22, 2008):
>As I recall, they said that Fasch used much cheaper ink for the stave lines and far better ink for the notes and thus in these vaults the notes survived.<
Makes sight reading difficult, but plenty of latitude for interpretation?

I am still hooked on the visualisation of student compositors of Bach arias (per BBC), sight reading their works the next AM.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 22, 2008):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
>> As I recall, they said that Fasch used much cheaper ink for the stave lines and far better ink for the notes and thus in these vaults the notes survived.<>
> Makes sight reading difficult, but plenty of latitude for interpretation? >
Well only if they had bee's wax candles to sing by.

> I am still hooked on the visualisation of student compositors of Bach arias (per BBC), sight reading their works the next AM. <
Yah, me too!

 

OT: Johann Friedrich Fasch Files Uploaded

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 13, 2009):
Aryeh has placed two recordings of Johann Friedrich Fasch's music on the Bach website, in an effort to provide context to Bach's compositional efforts and for the sheer beauty of wonderfully written music: a Magnificat and an orchestral suite in D major. The music was recorded from a concert in October 2008 in Dresden (I assume the
manuscripts are housed there and the music was obviously performed by the Dresden Kapelle). I sincerely appreciate Aryeh's decision to share this with the list.
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Mus/Fasch-Mus.htm

I hope you enjoy this, it's wonderful material!

Thank you

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 13, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Aryeh has placed two recordings of Johann Friedrich Fasch's music on the Bach website, in an effort to provide context to Bach's compositional efforts and for the sheer beauty of wonderfully written music: a Magnificat and an orchestral suite in D major. >
These are great performances of fine, fine works. The Magnificat, with its Italian format of continuous solo "verses" alternating with choral "tutti" is delightful: the Bourree which opens it is positively Handelian. The difference between Fasch's format could not be more different that Bach's micro-cantata setting of the Magnificat. Although they both give "suscepit Israel" to upper (boys) voices to symbolize the text.

More please!

Ed Myskowski wrote (January 13, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
>I sincerely appreciate Aryeh's decision to share this with the list.<
I would like to express my support for Aryeh's decision. Although I do not often listen to clips via computer becasue of my <technically challenged> condition, I have acquired some very enjoyable CDs based on Kims posts, and I notice others have made the same comment.

When Kim first began his posts, putting Bach in wider context, I was a bit skeptical. I do not recall for sure, but I may have gotten lucky and never posted anything to that effect. In any case, I have changed my mind. I thoroughly enjoy Kim's posts to whatever extent Aryeh can accomodate them. On reflection, I realize that my early skepticism was motivated mainly by concern for the moderator's work load. In fact, that is not for me to worry about. I think he does a fine job taking care of himself and BCW, an opinion I have never been shy about expressing.

John Pike wrote (January 13, 2009):
[To Ed Myskowski] Absolutely agree with all this 100%.

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 13, 2009):
Other Composer Sound files

Ed Myskowski wrote:
< When Kim first began his posts, putting Bach in wider context, I was a bit skeptical. I do not recall for sure, but I may have gotten lucky and never posted anything to that effect. In any case, I have changed my mind. I thoroughly enjoy Kim's posts to whatever extent Aryeh can accomodate them. >
There are all kinds of works which most of us never get an opportunity to hear but would be invaluable on the exceprts page. Off the top of my head, I would add Handel's setting of "Eilt Ihr Angeforchten Seelen and the Handl "Ecc Quomodo" which was sung after the Passion on Good Friday. Stauffer has examples of masses from the Dresden chapel which would be fascinating comparisons wit the Mass in B Minor (BWV 232). Johann Christoph Bach also wrote a cantata on the "Es Erhub sich Ein Streit" text.

I could go on ...

 

OT: Johann Friedrich Fasch - Vocal Works

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 15, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
"Aryeh has placed two recordings of Johann Friedrich Fasch's music on the Bach website, in an effort to provide context to Bach's compoefforts and for the sheer beauty of wonderfully written music: a Magnificat and an orchestral suite in D major."
Following Kim's initiative, I have complied a comprehensive discography of J.F. Fasch's vocal works.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Fasch-Vocal.htm
(not too many recordings, I'm afraid)

J.F. Fasch gained widespread fame, and was invited to compete for the post of Kantor at the Thomasschule in Leipzig against J.S. Bach, but apparently refused to do so. J.S. Bach held Fasch's music in high esteem, copied out five orchestral suites of his, and even performed performed two J.F. Fasch's cantatas in Leipzig. Only one of them has been recorded so far.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Fasch-Cantata-FWVDG1.htm

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 15, 2009):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< Following Kim's initiative, I have complied a comprehensive discography of J.F. Fasch's vocal works.
See:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Fasch-Vocal.htm
(not too many recordings, I'm afraid) >
Thank you, thank you, thank you! That's fantastic Aryeh! I've shown the page to some Fasch specialist/friends and they're just as excited by that; it's greatly appreciated.

 

Johann Friedrich Fasch: Short Biography | Recordings of Vocal Works | Cantata Gehet zu seinen Thoren ein, FWV D:G 1 | Johann Friedrich Fasch & Bach | Music Examples

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Last update: ýJanuary 16, 2009 ý11:04:37