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Christoph Graupner & Bach

Graupner Seven Last Words

Douglas Cowling wrote (July 17, 2008):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Graupner's series of cantatas based on "Christ's Seven Last Words on the Cross" is top notch music. I understand some of these cantatas will be released on CD shortly. >
I heard a live concert of the Graupner on CBC Radio from Montreal and it is sensational. Let us know when the recording is released.

 

OT: "Gelber Tod"

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 28, 2009):
I know there are quite a few specialists here, so I'll go ahead and ask for some help. A friend of mine is doing transcriptions of Graupner cantata texts (mostly by Johann Konrad Lichtenberg (I believe he was the court pastor at Darmstadt) and ran into a cantata with the chorale "Komm Sterblicher, betrachte mich."

This chorale is rather morose, even by the German baroque standards:

du lebst, ich lebt auf Erden.
Was du jetzt bist, das war auch ich,
was ich bin, wirst du werden.
Du musst hernach, ich bin vorhin;
ach! denke nicht in deinem Sinn,
dass du nicht dürfest sterben.

2. Bereite dich, stirb ab der Welt,
denk auf die letzten Stunden;
wenn man den Tod verächtlich hält,
wird er sehr oft gefunden.
Es ist die Reihe heut an mir,
wer weiß, vielleicht gilt s morgen dir,
ja wohl noch diesen Abend.

In the 6. verse the death speaks of the "gelbe Tod":

6. Sprich nicht: ich bin frisch und gesund,
mir schmeckt auch noch das Essen.
Ach! es wird wohl jetzt diese Stund
dein Sarg dir abgemessen.
Es schneidet dir der gelbe Tod
ja täglich in die Hand das Brot.
Bereite dich zum Sterben!

Translated:
"Don't say: I'm fresh and sane,
and I enjoy the meal.
Ouh, during this hour
your coffin will be measured (for your figure).
The yellow death cuts
daily the bread into your hand.
Be prepared to die!"

Shudder

Anyway, does anyone on the list have a detailed understanding of what "Gelber Tod" would mean? The friend who is doing the German transcriptions is a native German speaker, and excels at reading 18th century handwriting, but this rather arcane expression has eluded him. Any leads or ideas would be GREATLY appreciated.

Thanks!

Jane Newble wrote (January 28, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] I can only think that it would be called yellow death because the of bad liver function causing jaundice. This could be caused by cancer or yellow fever, or malaria, or even misuse of alcohol/drugs.

Perhaps liver-cancer in an age when not much was known about it, or yellow fever, seem the most likely. Yellow fever epidemics broke out in the 1700's in Italy, France, Spain and England, which would have been in the later part of Graupner's life. It was calle the "Yellow Plague" in the early Middle Ages.
Interesting text!!

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 28, 2009):
[To Jane Newble] Wow! And we complain when Bach set "Die ganze Welt ist nur ein Hospital"!

Joel Figen wrote (January 29, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< 6. Sprich nicht: ich bin frisch und gesund,
mir schmeckt auch noch das Essen.
Ach! es wird wohl jetzt diese Stund
dein Sarg dir abgemessen.
Es schneidet dir der gelbe Tod
ja täglich in die Hand das Brot.
Bereite dich zum Sterben!
Translated:
"Don't say: I'm fresh and sane,
and I enjoy the meal.
Ouh, during this hour
your coffin will be measured (for your figure).
The yellow death cuts
daily the bread into your hand.
Be prepared to die!"
Shudder >
I'm thinking it refers to economic conditions, and very possibly to some historical ruler or official who was stingy as all get out. Perhaps he had blond hair or jaundice, or lived in a yellow house.

also: I can't help being reminded of a child's scary song: did you ever think, when the hearse rolls by that you may be the next to die.....

William Rowland (Ludwig) wrote (January 29, 2009):
[To Joel Figen] Ach ja! What mobid thoughts. Surely Bach did not write a Cantata with a libretto like this?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (January 29, 2009):
[To Ludwig] This is a chorale USED by Graupner in a cantata, not the cantata text-- but I agree there isn't anything quite as descriptive in Bach's cantatas or chorales. BUT there is a morose fascination with death in his music (common the period actually). In fact John Eliot Gardiner explains this in the 2000 Pilgrim tour DVD (I think the segment was shot in the St. Thomas Church cemetary).

James Atkind Pritchard wrote (February 3, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow, regarding his orofinal message] The mention of cutting suggests to me "Crocea Mors", which means "Yellow Death". According to Geoffrey of Monmouth's "Historia Regum Britanniae" (Book 4, Chapter 4) "Crocea Mors" was the name of the sword of Julius Caesar. It was said to be mortal to every body that was wounded with it:

* http://tinyurl.com/c89hz4

* It also appears in Jasper Fisher's "Fuimus Troes", which was published in 1633:

* http://tinyurl.com/d32urp

* No idea to what extent Geoffrey of Monmouth or Jasper Fisher would have been read in eighteenth-century Germany.

Of course to identify "der gelbe Tod" with a sword is not to preclude its also being identified with a disease.

 

Graupner GW472

Continue of discussion from: Cantata BWV 142 - Discussions

John Pike wrote (April 4, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
<< Certainly seems to be the case for Christoph Graupner, he used it in several pieces including a large A major orchestral suite for flute/oboe/viola d'amore and strings. I call it "The Lovey Dovey Suite" ;)
You can hear some excerpted movements using my edition here:
http://arsantiguapresents.com/tag/joyce-alper/ James Atkins Pritchard wrote:
< Kim, this Graupner is very beautiful. Thank you so much. >
I agree. Lovely music.

In all seriousness, I think Kim should be honoured by the Germans for his unique services to German music (especially Telemann and Graupner). Without all his hard and excellent work, much of this music would be lost, probably forever. How does one go about recommending someone for a German award/honour? (I was thinking about recommending someone in the UK for a Queens honour recently but the process is so complex that I have had to put it on hold after writing a reference due to lack of time to do all the other necessary stuff. :-(

A review in BBC Music Magazine a few months ago of Genevieve Soly's latest recording of harpsichord Music by Graupner was awarded 5* (the highest) and was awarded best disc in the instrumental section that month. The reviewer also remarked on how fine the music was. Does she use your editions, Kim?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (April 6, 2009):
John Pike wrote:
> A review in BBC Music Magazine a few months ago of Genevieve Soly's latest recording of harpsichord Music by Graupner was awarded 5* (the highest) and was awarded best disc in the instrumental section that month. The reviewer also remarked on how fine the music was. Does she use your editions, Kim? <
Thanks for such kind words John, it's so thoughtful, but I couldn't do what I do without help and advice from a lot of friends (e.g. Monica Steger who's researched and finishing a dissertation on Graupner's secular cantatas, or Dr. Berhard Schmitt who is helping transcribe the 1400 cantata texts, and most of all my editor/publisher Brian Clark of Prima la Music!, who agreed to take on the complete Graupner ouvertures and sinfonia project.

But I'm most grateful for kind folks such as yourself and others here on the Bach cantatas who share such a deep passion for good music and are open to new discoveries and ideas. I don't want to edit music that just sits on a library shelf gathering dust. Music is meant to be performaned and shared and listened to and talked about! I'm most grateful for Aryeh's willingness to allow that in this fantastic forum!

Genevieve Soly uses Graupner's own edition of the harpsichord suites I believe; and has prepared a modern performing edition that will be published shortly, if it's not already.

John Pike wrote (April 6, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Thanks for such kind wordsJohn, it's so thoughtful, but I couldn't do what I do without help and advice from a lot of friends (e.g. Monica Steger who's researched and finishing a dissertation on Graupner's secular cantatas, or Dr. Berhard Schmitt who is helping transcribe the 1400 cantata texts, and most of all my editor/publisher Brian Clark of Prima la Music!, who agreed to take on the complete Graupner ouvertures and sinfonia project. >
Well many thanks and congratulations to everyone involved in this splendid project then!

 

OT: Early Music America Magazine

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (May 28, 2009):
Early Music America's Summer issue has been published, and my three page article on Christoph Graupner appeared. My article aside, this issue is really good with articles on Harry Christophers taking over the Handel-Haydn Society of Boston, plus a great article on Mendelssohn's performances of Bach's passions.

EMA has made a copy of my article available for free on their website and the link is: http://www.earlymusic.org/sample-article-advertiser-index-current-issue

Douglas Cowling wrote (May 28, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Congratulations Kim! Great article. Without you on this list, Graupner would still be just a name in footnote for me.

Ed Myskowski wrote (May 29, 2009):
Douglas wrote:
< Congratulations Kim! Great article. Without you on this list, Graupner would still be just a name in footnote for me. >
Although I did not yet access the article, I did previously take the opportunity to snag a couple Graupner CDs, after Kim's suggestions. I second Dougs thought: Graupner is no longer just a footnote to Bach, on this list, thanks to Kim.

As always, thanks to the moderator for carefully managing the edges of relevance to Bach.

John Pike wrote (June 2, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] I add my congratulations to those of Doug and others on a superlatively good article; interesting, comprehensive, and well-researched. Most of all, thanks largely to you and your colleagues, Graupner's music can once again take its rightful place in the canon.

Many congratulations

 

OT: Question about abbreviation on 18th century cantata scores

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (November 4, 2009):
Frequently on Christoph Graupner scores, he writes J.N.J.M.N. (then the feast day for the cantata).

Could someone provide me with the written out text and a translation?

Thanks so much,

Douglas Cowling wrote (November 5, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< J.N.J.M.N >
I've never seen the abbreviation, but if it's an intercessory petition similar to J.J. ( = Jesu help), it might be a text such as:

Jesu Nostri Judex Miserere Nobis ( = Jesu, our judge, have mercy upon us)

I'll post the question on a liturgical history forum and see if someone recognizes it.

 

Christoph Graupner / Bach and the Brandenburgs concert series

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (November 11, 2009):
Christoph Graupner in Philadelphia

Tempesta di Mare
<http://www.tempestadimare.org/>, one of the finest baroque orchestras in the United States, will perform the American première of Christoph Graupner's Ouverture for Recorder, Strings, and Basso continuo in F major, GWV 447 on December 19 & 20, 2009. Gwyn Roberts will be the recorder soloist. For more information on tickets and reservations, please visit their website.

Ed Myskowski wrote (November 11, 2009):
Christoph Graupner in Philadelphia

Stretch, re Bach relevance, no?

Response, re Reiche references?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (November 11, 2009):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< Stretch, re Bach relevance, no? >
Golly no, since the concerts are performing all the Brandenburg Concerti with music of Bach's peers, to show influences that affected baroque composers (this was outlined on the link to Tempesta di Mare's website).

< Response, re Reiche references? >
Yes, that Herr Reiche played a mean trumpet (apparently).

Evan Cortens wrote (November 11, 2009):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Thanks for the message and the link; this looks like an amazing orchestra and an excellent series! The musicians listed there are all excellent, I only regret that four hours is a little too far to drive for an evening concert. (As it happens, I'll be in Philly this weekend though, for the AMS conference.)

The three pre-concert chats also look great; Marissen, Kevorkian and Zohn are all top-notch scholars!

Thanks again,

 

Christoph Graupner cantatas performance requirements compared to Bach

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 2, 2009):
Doug Cowling had asked some specific questions about Graupner's cantatas (so to compare them with Bach's for performance habits). I've generated a HTML page from my own spreadsheet that I coded from RISM searches. My list for some reason is missing about 50 cantatas, but there are more than enough to give you an idea about the performance forces for the cantatas.
http://www.baroquewave.com/darmstadt/graupner_cantata_Listing.htm

Ignore the colors (that's for my own research purposes ;)

There is a field to the right with this type of information:

15 S, A, T, B (2x): 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 - vl 1 (2x), 2, vla, vlne (2x),
bc: 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2 - ob, chalumeau 1, 2: 1, 1, 1f.

That's a description of the parts-- Soprano with the numbers telling you how many copies there are of the parts after. vl (2x) means 2 copies of that part.

I hope this lends itself to something helpful.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 2, 2009):
Ops:

Actually some of the colors are blocks of cantata cycles (that helps me to see the patterns).

Graupner shared duties with a bass singer named Grunewald (from Leipzig) who died in 1739. They had a weird agreement that if the other died, they would burn their manuscripts. NOT a single shred of Grunewald's music survives! I estimate that he wrote at least 500 - 700 cantatas.

You can see after Grunewald's death, Graupner's production skyrocketed (1740, 1741, 1742).

The guy must have never slept!

Douglas Cowling wrote (December 2, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Doug Cowling had asked some specific questions about Graupner's cantatas (so to compare them with Bach's for performance habits). >
This is fascinating material, the more so because it gives us a contemporary lateral context for Bach. Odd to see cantatas being written after the death of Bach -- 1776 in fact!

As expected, the Graupner and Bach's calendars are almost identical but there are some significant differences:

1) The three Marian feasts were celebrated but not St. Michael (Sept 29) or St. John (June 24). These must have been especially significant for Leipzig (fair, etc). I couldn't see any Reformation Festival cantatas.

2) All of the Sundays in Advent and Lent have cantatas.

3) The biggest difference is that Holy Week was celebrated much more elaborately than in Leipzig.

There were cantatas on:

Palm Sunday (Dominca Palamarum)

Maundy Thursday (Dies Viridium, Gründonnerstag)

Good Friday (Dies Parasceve, Karfreitag)

Bach had no requirement for cantatas on those days. Was the Passion sung in concerted settings on Good Friday in Darmstadt?

4) In 1742, Trinity 27 made one of its rare appearances, and Graupner wrote a cantata which clearly took the theme of the Parable of the Wise and Foolish Virgins: "Auf zundet eure Lampen an". It would be interesting to
compare it with "Wachet Auf", Bach's only cantata for that Brigadoon Sunday.

5) And what's the story on Graupner's setting of "Tonet ihr Pauken erschallt ihr Trompeten"? Did he use the same libretto as Bach?

Some interesting patterns in scoring to peruse as well.

Thanks for posting.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 3, 2009):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Bach had no requirement for cantatas on those days. Was the Passion sung in concerted settings on Good Friday in Darmstadt? >
None that I know of.

< 5) And what's the story on Graupner's setting of "Tonet ihr Pauken erschallt ihr Trompeten"? Did he use the same libretto as Bach? >
I doubt it, I think the piece you're speaking of is a birthday cantata for the Landgrave, and just a coincidence of words, since trumpets and drums resounding would be a very common poetic text / device for a prince, lord or whatever you'd call Ernst Ludwig (the technical word was "Landgrave" which I take means "land count"). Ernst Ludwig's birthday fell on Dec 26, which was a big deal, Graupner had large forces for those pieces, and it appears that for the years up to 1739, Grunewald got to write the cantatas for Christmas day-- in an effort to let Graupner focus on the large birthday cantata.

Evan Cortens wrote (December 2, 2009):
Agreed, fascinating stuff, thanks very much for this Kim!

Douglas Cowling wrote:
< This is fascinating material, the more so because it gives us a contemporary lateral context for Bach. Odd to see cantatas being written after the death of Bach -- 1776 in fact! >
Two points:

1) I'm curious about this 1776 date; given than Graupner died in 1760, this can't be a date of composition... What might it be? A date of performance from a later owner? A library's or collector's date of acquisition?

2) As it happens Doug, contrary to what Friedrich Blume might like you to believe, the cantata tradition in Germany was alive and well into the 1780s. Just to name a few composers who were well known in their day and made their living writing cantatas in a vein very similar to JSB: C.P.E. Bach (cantor in Hamburg, 1767-1788); Gottfried August Homilius (cantor in Dresden, 1755-1785); and Georg Anton Benda (Kapellmeister in Gotha, 1750-1795). As it happens, this music forms the basis of my dissertation work, still in its early stages.

Evan Cortens wrote (December 2, 2009):
I should clarify: those dates I've given are the dates for the appointment I mention. Perhaps coincidentally (or not?), the final date in all three cases happens to be their death date as well.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 3, 2009):
Evan Cortens wrote:
< Agreed, fascinating stuff, thanks very much for this Kim! >
Sure thing :-)

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 3, 2009):
Evan Cortens wrote:
< I should clarify: those dates I've given are the dates for the appointment I mention. Perhaps coincidentally (or not?), the final date in all three cases happens to be their death date as well. >
Yes, Graupner lost his vision in April of 1754, and wasn't able to write, and died in 1760. Johann Endler was his asst became full Kapellmeister then and died a few years later himself. It's very odd that Endler has very very few surviving cantatas for his 25 year stint in Darmstadt and "only" 30 orchestral suites, which are ABSOLUTELY charming pieces of baroque music. Make every effort to find CDs with them!

The 1776 date could have been a performance by someone long after Graupner died. There is some evidence some of the cantatas were performed years after his death. The court seized all the manuscripts from the family and refused to pay any money for them, since in the court's mind the music was the "intellectual property" of the court. Christoph Graupner wanted ALL of his music burnt after his death btw.

Neil Halliday wrote (December 3, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
>15 S, A, T, B (2x): 1, 1, 1, 1, 1 - vl 1 (2x), 2, vla, vlne (2x),
bc: 2, 2, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2 - ob, chalumeau 1, 2: 1, 1, 1f.<
There are certainly unusual numbers of performers, as well as (surviving) parts, in this and the other cantatas.

For the above example, I read a choral group of S,A,T,B1,B2
with one surviving part for each; an instrumental group of 2 separate first violin lines (!) with two extant parts for each, one secomd violin line with one extant part, one viola line with one extant part, two separate violone lines(!) with one extant part for each; basso continuo 1,2 what does this mean? (1 cello, two organs?)

I must be wrong - for a start there are horrific balance problems in the strings.

Another example:
>S, A, T, B: 2, 1, 2, 1 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlc, org (2x): 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2 - ob 1, 2: 2, 1f.<
Two extant parts for S and T , but only one part for A and T?

Two extant parts each for violin 1, violin 2, and cello, but only one for viola? Two extant parts for first organ and two extant parts for second organ?

Elucidation please.

Neil Halliday wrote (December 3, 2009):
Neil Halliday wrote:
< Two extant parts for S and T, but only one part for A and T? >
Should read
>Two extant parts for S and T, but only one part for A and B?>

What about SATB: 6,1,3,3 (etc, further down the list)?

Douglas Cowling wrote (December 3, 2009):
Neil Halliday wrote:
< Two extant parts for first organ and two extant parts for second organ? >
Are the organ parts in concert pitch or Kammerton?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 3, 2009):
[To Florian Heyerick] :I am a participant with a Yahoo Bach Cantata group, and for comparing Bach's cantata parts with Graupner, I posted my Excel spreadsheet to help:
http://www.baroquewave.com/darmstadt/graupner_cantata_Listing.htm

I got this information from the RISM, but sometimes it's not clear::

For example:
we have the birthday cantata:
Las Darmstadt unter vollen Choren ein jauchzendes Frolocken horen Ad Festum natal. Sereniss. 1728.
15 S, A, T, B: 3, 2, 2, 2 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlne (2x), bc: 4, 3, 3, 4, 4, 5 -
ob 1, 2, clno 1, 2: 3, 3, 1, 1 - timp: 1f.
What do those numbers mean?

Soprano 3 parts?
Alto 2 parts
Tenor 2 parts
Bass 2 parts

or does the number reference something else?

When you look at the string parts - if it's PARTS, 5 copies of the basso continuo seems like a lot!

But a majority of the cantatas seem to have just one part for the singers (which is why the Bach cantata group is curious about this information, because they're having a debate about Rifkin and one voice per part).

Thanks.

10 S, A, T, B: 1, 1, 1, 2 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlne (2x), bc: 1, 1, 1, 2, 1, 2f.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 3, 2009):
As you can see with my mis-send earlier, I've asked Florian Heyerick for some clarification about the RISM information, but from a quick glane at the spreadsheet, many of the cantatas are for one voice per part:

Eure Rede sey allzeit lieblich und mit Salz a 2 Violin Viola Canto Alto Tenore e Continuo. Dn. 13. p. Tr. 1730.
S, A, T: 1, 1, 1 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlne, bc: 1, 1, 1, 1, 2f.
One voice per part there.

@ Doug's question: the organ was at regular pitch typically, but there could be bassoon parts, which I think in the example I looked at would explain why there would be five (Bassoon 1,2, Organ, Violone, Cello).The birthday cantatas were for unusally large forces-- I doubt they were performed in the court chapel due to size constraints, and I think the loudness of the instruments would have blown out some ear drums (since there are several cantatas with up to six timpani in them!) There could be some errors in the RISM information as well, but it seems unlikely to me. I hope to get some clarification from this week, since Maestro Florian is visiting Darmstadt (and hopefully taking photographs of the restored court chapel for me).

Thank you kindly for your patience.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 4, 2009):
[To Douglas Cowling] Florian wrote back to me about the numbers issue in the RISM Excel spreadsheet:

For the example I gave:

Las Darmstadt unter vollen Choren ein jauchzendes Frolocken horen Ad Festum natal. Sereniss. 1728.
15 S, A, T, B: 3, 2, 2, 2 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlne (2x), bc: 4, 3, 3, 4,
4, 5 - ob 1, 2, clno 1, 2: 3, 3, 1, 1 - timp: 1f.

Florian wrote:
"Very fast (I am in Germany now for concerts). The numbers in RISM mean "folio": this is a double paperpage (so the Soprano is written on "3 Bogen" (this is German) - thats is why the continuo has 5! and the score itself 15! - just violone part 2 times."

So for clarificatio- this canata has single voice parts for all the singers, one part each for the strings, EXCEPT Violone, and single parts for all the other instruments. Telling for a rather festive cantata, the birthday of the Landgrave of Darmstadt.

Florian also asked that I point you to his extensive website http://graupner2010.synthasite.com . For what it is worth, Florian completely agrees there is no historical evidence for more one voice per part during Graupner's time, but he doesn't think that means we can't perform more voices to a part. I think one of the best Graupner recordings is the Hermann Max CD on CPO, which features a very morose cantata with concertante chalumeaux.

I hope this helps!

Evan Cortens wrote (December 4, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Florian wrote:
"Very fast (I am in Germany now for concerts). The numbers in RISM mean "folio": this is a double paperpage (so the Soprano is written on "3 Bogen" (this is German) - thats is why the continuo has 5! and the score itself 15! - just violone part 2 times."
So for clarification-- this canata has single voice parts for all the singers, one part each for the strings, EXCEPT Violone, and single parts for all the other instruments. Telling for a rather festive cantata, the birthday of the Landgrave of Darmstadt. >
Ah, good to have that cleared up; those numbers do make much more sense as folio counts.

Thanks again for your work on this!

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 4, 2009):
[To Evan Cortens] Have you seen this month's issue of Early Music America? There is a new piece in it by Rikfin's nemesis in it, and guess what, he uses the Arnold Schering article as "proof" against Rikfin. The article covers absolutely no new ground, except it mentions that some research has found written descriptions of Bach's performances in Leipzig having 30 or more performers. There's no footnotes or citations for this new research provided though. He did lead the article with a quote from one of the Leipzig town fathers that also mentions Bach conducting 30 or more performers.

It's a great read if you get the chance to see it (prolly in the Cornell Music Library no doubt).

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 5, 2009):
Neil Halliday wrote:
< Another example: >
>> S, A, T, B: 2, 1, 2, 1 - vl 1, 2, vla, vlc, org (2x): 2, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2 - ob 1, 2: 2, 1f.<<
< Two extant parts for S and T , but only one part for A and T?
Two extant parts each for violin 1, violin 2, and cello, but only one for viola? Two extant parts for first organ and two extant parts for second organ?
Elucidation please. >
The numbers refer to "bogen" (double pages in German).
2 Bogen for the Soprano (which makes sense if she has the bulk of arias).
1 Bogen for Alto.
2 Bogen for Tenor
1 Bogen for Bass.

Single part books for the voices and instruments, except the Organ which has two. That's untypical though. Not sure why this cantata has two organ parts.

Douglas Cowling wrote (December 5, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Not sure why this cantata has two organ parts. >
Harpsichord?

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 5, 2009):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Harpsichord? >
I doubt it seriously. Could be for cello and organ. Space was pretty tight in the Darmstadt chapel, but bviously they could squeeze in horns, trumpets, and every other instrument, so why not a harpsichord? I wished I could give you statistics about "organo" versus "cembalo" parts but I don't have that information at hand right now.

 

OT: GWV listing of Graupner cantatas now on BCW

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (February 22, 2010):
Thanks to Aryeh, the Bach Cantata Website has now a complete listing of all of Christoph Graupner's cantatas.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Graupner-Cantata.htm

Dr. Oswald Bill is the author and creator of this thematic index, which is still very much a work in progress.

Florian Keyerick is a Graupner scholar who has blended the GWV numbers into a database and provided me with the information.

Another valuable resource for the BCW ;)

P.S. The PDF document will be modified shortly, and Aryeh will upload that as soon as I finish creating it.

Evan Cortens wrote (February 22, 2010):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Looks great, thanks for all the wonderful work Kim!

Wow, that J. C. Lichtenberg was one busy poet... looks like he did about 95% of the texts, or so.

 

OT: Bach's Peers / Christoph Graupner: chorales, GWV 1105:53 and GWV 1111:44

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 25, 2012):
With Aryeh's permission, I thought I would share Christoph Graupner's chorale to the 1753 Christmas day cantata Jauchzet ihr Himmel, erfreue dich Erde. The orchestra requires 2 oboes, 2 flutes, 2 horns, 4 (!!) timpani,
strings, basso continuo, and SATB soloists. Graupner never changed the original chorale melody, and instead lavished he creativity on the instrumental accompaniment and ritornellos between the chorale verses, basing it on kernels within the chorale melody. This would be Graupner's last Christmas cantata; and by the following year, he lost his eyesight and was unable to write music, and lived another six years before dying in 1760.

The video is at: http://youtu.be/6tGMLR5jllI

The second chorale is from Ach mein Herzliebes Jesulein, GWV 1111:44

Written in 1744, this cantata features chalumeaux, timpani, strings, SATB soloists and continuo.

It's a beautiful chorale setting.

The video is at: http://youtu.be/8c_BMLOUURQ

Performers are:
Ex Tempore, Mannheimer Hofkapelle, Florian Heyerick conducting.

Wishing you and your loved ones a happy holiday

Douglas Cowling wrote (December 26, 2012):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< I thought I would share Christoph Graupner's chorale to the 1753 Christmas day cantata Jauchzet ihr Himmel, erfreue dich Erde. >
What a delightful Christmas bon-bon. Many thanks from the city of 75 Messiah performances!

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 26, 2012):
[To Douglas Cowling] You're most welcome Doug ;)

 

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Last update: ęDecember 30, 2012 ę14:08:34