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Georg Philipp Telemann & Bach
Discussions - Part 3

Continue from Part 2

Bach BWV 160 anhang - Jauchzet dem Herrn - help sought

Russell Telfer wrote (October 12, 2009):
My colleague in the Dorset Bach group would like to find sources of BWV 160 Anh from which to obtain the score. Ideal would be a score out of copyright, but failing that, a proprietary source will be needed for our own study of it.

Can anyone offer any leads? With thanks.

Juliane Mincham wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Russell Telfer] google in the link below. It takes you to a vast resource of scores which are out of copright and can be accessed, copied and used.

I don't use it for Bach as i have my own Barenreiter Urtext edition and have only briefly glanced at the Bach scores on this site but I think there may be one disadvantage in that with the old editions they use, I think they make use of the antequated tenor and soprano clefs.

But if you want a score to go over in a hurry you can certainly get one there.

Piano and vocal scores are, as I'm sure you know already, on Aryeh's website.

imslp/petrucci music library

Guilherme Almeida wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Julian Mincham] What's that website again?

Juliane Mincham wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Guilherme Almeida] its on the bottom of my original message--still there if you look down on that, and this page.

Russell Telfer wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Julian Mincham] Thanks for the email and the link, Julian.

We're (DBCC) doing this in February, so it's not a rush job. I've found the Petrucci site and am about to explore it.

When you mention Aryeh's collection of vocal scores, I don't think it includes 160a. BWV 160 is a Telemann work, and 160a is an obscure 8 part J S Bach motet. I will know more about this in due course - pushing the envelope, as the smarties might call it.

The San Francisco Bach Choir, their website tells me, performed it in 1997, and they have provided a copyright translation online. I also see that my Hanssler edition of the full set includes 160a, so that's something else to look forward to.

I might have more to add in a few days.

Aryeh Oron wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Russell Telfer] BWV Anh 160 does have a page on the BCW.
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWVAnh160.htm
In this page you can find to:
- Links to the original German text + English translation (I hope that Francis Browne would also provide his translation)
- Details of 6 recordings, all of them are commercially available.

I hope it helps.

Russell Telfer wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] Thanks Aryeh

I hadn't found it up to date, but it's new ground for me. I'm glad to be proved wrong.

Russell Telfer wrote (October 12, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] Could you please give me the link for pages on BWV 160a? I've tried scores and cantatas without success.

Many thanks,

 

Telemann Autobiography

Aryeh Oron wrote (October 14, 2009):
Following Kim Patrick Clow's initiative, Thomas Braatz contributed his translation of Telemann's autobiography from Mattheson's Ehren-Pforte (Hamburg, 1740).
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/TelemannEPMattheson.pdf
Linked from:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/index.htm
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Telemann-Georg-Philipp.htm
and other pages.

Georg Philipp Telemann speaks directly to us and tells us with choice words in his own clever and easy-to-read writing style about the wondrous coincidental events in his life, particularly in regard to musical matters. There are some important connections parallels with Bach's life.

Meidad Zaharia wrote (October 15, 2009):
[To Aryeh Oron] Thanks Aryeh,

I love Telemann and I regard his Tafelmusik as the closest composition to Bach's Brandenburg Concertos even if Tafelmusik suggests a name which indicates that the music was written for dinner entertainment.

Thanks...

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (October 15, 2009):
Meidad Zaharia wrote:
< Thanks Aryeh,
I love
Telemann and I regard his Tafelmusik as the closest composition to Bach's Brandenburg Concertos even if Tafelmusik suggests a name which indicates that the music was written for dinner entertainment. >
Many, many thanks to Thomas Braatz's hard work on this. I don't believe there isn't an complete English translation available in print, so having this resource at your fingertips is really quite remarkable; and I can't say enough nice things about it. Herr Braatz's explanations in the footnotes are quite extensive and noteworthy. Telemann's German (I'm told) has a wonderful sense of humor, but can be very idiomatic at times (e.g. the phrase "Cloak Years" is very arcane for even native Germans). There are quite a few surprises in store when you read the biography, as I discovered myself
;)

Again, thank you Thomas and Aryeh on this important contribution to the Bach website.

Neil Halliday wrote (October 15, 2009):
From the article on Telemann (thanks to Aryeh and Thomas):

>Finally, in Sorau, I (ie, Telemann) was able to make a connection with the famous cantor, Wolfgang Caspar Printz. He presented himself as a kind of Heraclitus and I as a Democritus, for he mourned bitterly over the excesses of composers with emphasis on melody at the same time just I ridiculed the artificial, unmelodic affectations of the older masters. Since he still maintained the hope that I would depart from the confusion and nonsense of the former [emphasis upon the melodic element over the contrapuntal]....<

No doubt this view (of Telemann's) is one reason why Telemann was more popular than Bach at the time; however, history has the judged the supreme contrapuntalist (Bach) the greater composer.

[Aside: It is odd that Printz describes an emphasis on melody as "confusion and nonsense"; one would expect it more likely that contrapuntal music would attract this description, in disparagement - have I read the above quote correctly?].

Still, what an amazing prodigy he (Telemann) was!

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (October 15, 2009):
Neil Halliday wrote:
< No doubt this view (of Telemann's) is one reason why Telemann was more popular than Bach at the time; however, history has the judged the supreme contrapuntalist (Bach) the greater composer. >
Oh, I think there was a lot of reasons why that happened. And of course, if you meant by "history" you mean musicologists in the vein of Spitta and other old fashioned 19th century musicologists that judged Bach the "greater composer," then sure. I'd agree with your statement.

< [Aside: It is odd that Printz describes an emphasis on melody as "confusion and nonsense"; one would expect it more likely that contrapuntal music would attract this description, in disparagement - have I read the above quote correctly?]. >
The statement (you read it correctly) shows there was a vibrant difference of opinionabout what elements made for good music during the period.

< Still, what an amazing prodigy he (Telemann) was! >
Truly, when you consider Telemann's personal circumstances: absolutely no support from his family or friends who were doing everything they could to sabotage his efforts. It's definitely a "puyourself-up-by-the-bootstraps" story.

William Hoffman wrote (October 15, 2009):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Still, what an amazing prodigy he (Telemann) was! >
William Hoffman replies: The Telemann autobiography not only shows parallels with Bach but also demonstrates, I think,but also the amazing opportunities that befell composers with talent in Germany. Fortunately, no great pecking order or rigorous apprenticeship existed as in the music heartland of Italy. Maybe that's a major reason the center of musical creativity was moving north again, this time to Vienna, where it would flourish for a century and a half.

Meanwhile, this serendipity in German-speaking lands enabled local composers to develop a new, distinct, vibrant, creative school of music in their enlightened and pluralistic culture.

 

Telemann's Doubling of Bass Parts

Aryeh Oron wrote (February 24, 2010):
Thomas Braatz contributed a short article which is in response to a question that has recently come up for discussion on the BCML.

Thomas Braatz wrote:
There are quite a few instances when Telemann scores his vocal parts SATBB leading an observer to wonder why Telemann did this. Jürgen Neubacher as investigated this matter and has come up with the following explanation: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Articles/DoppelterBass.pdf

Douglas Cowling wrote (February 24, 2010):
Thomas Braatz wrote:
< There are quite a few instances when Telemann scores his vocal parts SATBB leading an observer to wonder why Telemann did this. Jürgen Neubacher as investigated this matter and has come up with the following explanation: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Articles/DoppelterBass.pdf >
The article mentions the size of pedal divisions in German churches. Yet I can't think of a single cantata performance in the last 20 years which has used a larger instrument than a portative organ with 3 or 4 stops, and certainly no one doubles the continuo part with organ pedal.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (February 24, 2010):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< The article mentions the size of pedal divisions in German churches. Yet I can't think of a single cantata performance in the last 20 years which has used a larger instrument than a portative organ with 3 or 4 stops, and certainly no one doubles the continuo part with organ pedal. >
There is a suggestion that something in the design of the churches was requiring a doubling of bass voice parts and the sheer size of the bass pedal on their organs indicates something was unique to the design of the churches. I really didn't think the point was if the Hamburg churches used full organ with bass pedals during cantata performances.

I can tell you there was definitely a love affair going on with bass instruments. In the dozens upon dozens of scores and parts I've looked at from Darmstadt, Frankfurt, and Hamburg (Stölzel)-- there are several basso continuo parts. I wonder if the bass instruments were just not able to produce a lot of sound? When the Academy of Ancient Music recreated Handel's Water Music on a barge on the Thames, they did some sound tests to see how far away people would have been able to hear the instruments. They did tests using a violin, horn, and cello. The cello was the worst instrument. If you weren't within 10 feet of it, you could not have heard it, which means people along the shoreline were unlikely to have heard the strings.

Speaking of Hamburg churches:
I did try to find some interior photographs of the buildings but I didn't have much luck.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Hamburg-Michaeliskirche-Hafen.jpg
St. Michael's, where C.P.E. Bach and Mattheson are buried in the crypt.

Unfortunately, Telemann's remains had much worse luck :-(

George Bromley wrote (February 24, 2010):
[To Douglas Cowling] I wonder if it had anything to do with poor acoustics where the basses had to stand, I have sung in a Church in Johannesburg where the basses stood next to the organ blower outlet, in hot weather they could sound 1/2 a tone higher!

Douglas Cowling wrote (February 24, 2010):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< When the Academy of Ancient Music recreated Handel's Water Music on a barge on the Thames, they did some sound tests to see how far away people would have been able to hear the instruments. They did tests using a violin, horn, and cello. The cello was the worst instrument. If you weren't within 10 feet of it, you could not have heard it, which means people along the shoreline were unlikely to have heard the strings. >
I heard the same group do the Royal Fireworks Music with the original number of instruments. I still have nightmares remembering the sound of 14 period oboes tuning! The sound of 4 bassoons and contrabass on the continuo line was positively Wagnerian.

Modern performances of cantatas avoid a heavily weighted bass line and would never think of adding a 16 foot or (gasp) 32 foot pedal doubling. Yet there are cantatas where a big organ plenum would be effective: e.g "Wir Danken Dir", "Gott ist Mein König", "Sicut Locutus Est" (Magnificat), Kyrie II (Mass in B Minor). It certainly isn't because Bach was technically unable to play the lines: his pedalwork is virtuosic.

This will cause a flame-war, but most cantatas are now recorded as chamber works with no regard to their original acoustic setting. There is little experimentation with large, kaleidoscopically-coloured organs and certainly not with expansive acoustics.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (February 24, 2010):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Modern performances of cantatas avoid a heavily weighted bass line and would never think of adding a 16 foot or (gasp) 32 foot pedal doubling. Yet there are cantatas where a big organ plenum would be effective: e.g "Wir Danken Dir", "Gott ist Mein König", "Sicut Locutus Est" (Magnificat), Kyrie II (Mass in B Minor). It certainly isn't because Bach was technically unable to play the lines: his pedalwork is virtuosic. >
Of course, it varied by area and period, but I often wondered if the reason why Mozart's Salzburg masses didn't use violas was simply because they would not have been heard in such a huge acoustic area.

Here's an interior shot: http://physics.ucsc.edu/~drip/austria/images/dom.JPG

Ed Myskowski wrote (February 24, 2010):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< I can't think of a single cantata performance in the last 20 years which has used a larger instrument than a portative organ with 3 or 4 stops >
The series of recordings by Christophe Coin sneak into the 20 year window. Although the cantatas were selected to accurately represent Bachs writing for violincello piccolo, the recordings also feature church organ. From booklet notes by Coin:

<The choice, for the recordings, of a charming little church on the borders of Saxony and Thuringia was justified chiefly by the presence of an organ by Silbermann. [...]

While the organ parts in almost all the engravings of the cantatas are played on a small instrument (chest organ), we thought it would be interesting to use the great organ even for the continuo. It thus becomes the main axis around which instrumentalists and singers then gather.> (end quote)

I pass this along without comment, especially re the accuracy of the comment re engravings.

Douglas Cowling wrote (February 24, 2010):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< I often wondered if the reason why Mozart's Salzburmasses didn't use violas was simply because they would not have been heard in such a huge acoustic area.
Here's an interior shot:
http://physics.ucsc.edu/~drip/austria/images/dom.JPG >
Austrian church music was notoriously conservative and retained the format of paired instruments which Monteverdi pioneered at the beginning of the 17th century.

That photo of Salzburg Cathedral is actually deceptive. If you look closely, you will see four choir galleries, each with a permanent organ, on the four piers of the the dome. These galleries face each other and in fact create quite a contained performance space. I was keen to test the space in which the famous 60-part "Missa Salisburiensis" by Biber was performed. My wife and I and our two sons each stood under one of the galleries and we could easily hear each other speaking normally.

Music performed from these galleries would have sounded above the heads of the listeners and amplified by the dome as it was carried down into the nave. The same acoustical trick can be experienced in the "Whispering Gallery" at St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

Biber's mass was originally performed by eight "choirs": four in the galleries, and four on raised platforms under the galleries. The music is filled with paired solo voices and solo instruments which would have had no problem projecting in the acoustic. At the same time, the tuttis would have been enhanced by the dome's reverberance.

Much fun can be had playing with this panoramic view of the Dom's interior: http://austria-360.at/salzburg/page-dom.html

Modern audiences take dry concert halls as the norm and assume that reverberent acoustics are a liability. They are when music is performed where it was never intended, on the altar stairs, and always a revelation when the music returns to its historic positions in elevated galleries and enclosed choirs.

Ed Myskowski wrote (February 24, 2010):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Music performed from these galleries would have sounded above the heads of the listeners and amplified by the dome as it was carried down into the nave. The same acoustical trick can be experienced in the "Whispering Gallery" at St. Paul's Cathedral in London. >
Visitors to (or residents of) Boston MA, USA, can experience a neat demonstration of the trick at the Mapparium, a three-story globe at the Christian Science (oxymoron?) Mother Church. A pedestrian bridge passes through on a diameter of a stained glass globe, back-illuminated. Folks can stand at either end of the bridge and whisper to each other, the sound transmitted not across the bridge, but via the spherical acoustic.

The Mapparium was constructed in the pre-WW2 era when Brittania ruled the waves, and as Randy Newman so aptly puts it, the great nations of Europe were (still!) coming through. It is preserved as an historic artifact, no longer (or never?) politically correct. It is oft stated that it is no longer geographically accurate, but that statement incorrectly conflates geography and politics, a human failing even older than the fight about when to celebrate Easter.

Parenthesis (I have an idea): Good Friday can be the first Friday after Seder, followed by Easter Sunday. Does everyone agree when to celebrate Passover? If not, we can work that out at the same time. Probably too late to fix it up for 2010, but after 17 centuries of dispute, another lost year here or there should hardly matter. I am starting on my corrected 2010 calendar, and suggested 2011 calendar ASAP. Just in time to avert the potentially apocalyptic expiration of the Mayan calendar in 2012 (12/12/12?).

If I understand correctly, the original justification for separating Easter from Passover was to enable correlation with the days of the week, i.e., Crucifixion always on a Friday (hence the Good) and Easter always on a Sunday. More or less analogous to the way Americans now celebrate Abraham Lincolns and George Washingtons birthdays on the intervening Monday, sacrificing two random holidays for one three-day weekend. You can fool some of the people all of the time? (end parenthesis)

Back to the globe: politically correct or not, it is quite impressive to experience planet Earth (the Home Planet!) as a sphere: Two things in particular stand out for me
(1) The scope of the Oceanic (Pacific) cultures, nearly half the planet. How the Great Nations of Oceania (pre Brittania) managed the settlement and acculturation of that expanse remains a mystery, and tribute to the human spirit. Mahalo, Pele.
(2) The relative amount of territory Belgium managed to snag with the Congo, which straddles the equator, and is often diminished in visual impact by the traditional Mercator projection. For that matter, the scope of the whole continent of Africa (the Home Continent, for those of us who identify as homo sapiens!) is better grasped globally, or at least with non-Mercator two dimensional projections.

I wonder if Bach had access to a globe? Luther?

 

OT: Telemann's Leipzig probe?

William Hoffman wrote (July 14, 2010):
Anyone with access to Telemann's Autobiography, can you tell us if he presented a probe piece in Leipzig, July-September 1722?

 

Brockes Passion

David Glenn Levut Jr. wrote (August 8, 2010):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
<< Telemann's version of Brockes-Passion was probably performed by J.S. Bach.
See:
http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Telemann-Brockes-Passion.htm >>
>
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< This page provides links to a very interesting WIKI page on the Telemann Passions:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Philipp_Telemann%27s_Passions
Telemann's plan for his Passions was extraordinarily consistent. Although there are quite a few missing setting, he systematically composed settings of the Passions in the canonical order of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John from 1722 - 67. Now that's a well-regulated church music!
Did
Leipzig have this same prescribed four-year sequence or was Bach free to choose the Gospel? (the latter seems unlikely to me). Does anyone have Stiller to hand to check? >
Douglas Cowling wrote:
"Did Leipzig have this same prescribed four-year sequence or was Bach free to choose the Gospel?"
I answer thusly:

First, my apologies for being so late with this. So much has happened in the last couple years.

It is interesting that you bring up Hamburg traditions and ask if Leipzig had similar traditions.

As far as I know, there are two different and diametrically opposite principles operating here. Here is a brief synopsis of both:

Principle 1 (which we shall call the "Hamburg principle"): The Passion (or Passion Oratorio, depending on the case) was actually NOT performed on Good Friday in the main churches (the ones that Telemann had responsibility for the music), but rather throughout the Lenten season (from Thursday after Judica Sunday through Good Friday, the secondary churches would perform Passion music almost daily) in the following order:

1.) Invocavit Sunday (Petriskirche)

2.) Reminiscere Sunday (Nikolaikirche)

3.) Oculi Sunday (none performed--this day was traditionally reserved for installation music [Juraten-Einfuehrungsmusik] at the Michaeliskirche)

4.) Laetere Sunday (Katherinenkirche)

5.) Judica Sunday (Jakobiskirche)

6.) Palmarum (Palm Sunday) (Michaeliskirche)

This info I got from the Preface: Passions from my copy of the CPE Bach ComWorks edition of his Matthaeus-Passion H. 782 (1769).

Passions were traditionally in Canonical order (Matthew, Mark, Luke, John)--there is still some debate as to why Emanuel Bach chose to write his first Hamburg Passion according to St. Matthew, thus making it out of sync with the state of affairs in Hamburg at the time (he should have composed a setting of the St. John Passion instead, as the last one performed before he came to Hamburg was a repeat performance of the last St. Luke Passion of Telemann.).

Principle 2 (which we shall call the "Leipzig principle"): The text of the Passion would have been selected by Bach after he ascertained from the Sexton and the preacher (Pfarrherr) of whichever church (the Thomaskirche or the Nikolaikirche) would hold the Good Friday Vespers service (during which the Passion setting for the year would be performed) what Passion Gospel would be presented that year. Unlike Hamburg (which did not hold a Good Friday Vespers service per se), Leipzig had a period during which no music outside of simple chorales would be sung (a Tempus clausum period) which extended throughout Lent (from Invocavit Sunday through Judica Sunday), with the exception of the times when the Marian feast of the Annunciation (25 March) fell in Lent. This is (I think) one of the reasons why the Johannes-Passion BWV 245 was presented in two consecutive years (1724 and 1725), albeit in different formats.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (August 8, 2010):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< This page provides links to a very interesting WIKI page on the Telemann Passions:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georg_Philipp_Telemann%27s_Passions
Telemann's plan for his Passions was extraordinarily consistent. Although there are quite a few missing setting, he systematically composed settings of the Passions in the canonical order of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John from 1722 - 67. Now that's a well-regulated church music! >
Just wanted to interject that Telemann's grandson Georg Michael Telemann may had a role in so many of the early passion settings missing. Jurgen Neubacher's research indicates G.M. Telemann was responsible for the destruction of entire cantata cycles prior to 1740, because they were too old fashioned for GMT to use in his capacity as music director of the Riga cathedral. What music GMT didn't throw out, some pieces were literally sliced up and cut and pasted into hodge podge pieces, including some Passion settings. I would assume this happened with the passion settings as well. Iroinically, Benda was saving Stoelzel's settings of the passions and large collections of his cantatas precisely because of the quality of the "old style" (i.e. fugal/contrapunctal). It's really odd how much what was considered worthless and old fashioned could vary from place to place and by music director.

 

OT: Major Telemann musical discovery

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (September 3, 2012):
With Aryeh's kind permission, I thought I would pass this along to the groups: a major Telemann find: a previously unknown wedding serenata has been recovered in Hamburg, Germany. Composed for the marriage of Alexander Richter and maid Rosina Brigitta Guden on December 4, 1754. The cantata text book which was printed (at significant cost) was known, but the music had been unidentified because of a late 18th century copy that was made by either a student of Telemann (likely Johann Christoph Schmügel (1726-1798), or one of his copyists (Otto Ernst Schieferlein Gregory (1704-1787), who either had access to Telemann's music library, or purchased it from Telemann's estate. It's a major find because of twenty pieces that Telemann composed for Hamburg weddings, this is only the second piece that the music
has survived.

Source (in German). Bibliothekssystem Universität Hamburg: Telemannsche Hochzeitskantate von 1754

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 3, 2012):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< Composed for the marriage of Alexander Richter and maid Rosina Brigitta Guden on December 4, 1754. >
Amazing discovery of a substantial work. Thanks for the link.

Tiny question ... Isn't "Jungfer" the equivalent of the legal English "spinster," an unmarried woman, to distinguish a class difference with a servant "maid" in German? The servant who accuses Peter in the St. John Passion is a maid = "Magd"

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (September 3, 2012):
[To Douglas Cowling] Yeah, bad translation. Jungfer can have a dual meaning, virgin and spinster.

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 4, 2012):
Spinsters, Maids and Virgins

[To Kim Patrick Clow] I'm sure I'm wrong about the class thing. Wotan calls his virgin goddess daughter, Brünnhilde, a "Magd".

I really should get back to work ...

Evan Cortens wrote (September 4, 2012):
Douglas Cowling & Kim Patrick Clow] I think in this case "Jungfer" just means unmarried woman, regardless of class. "Spinster" used to have the same meaning in English decades ago. For example, in the marriage records from late nineteenth-century Ontario, the man is either a bachelor or a widower and the woman is either a spinster or a widow. Of course, this word has since taken on an additional pejorative dimension. Thus, I'd probably translate the title from the libretto simply as "Marriage cantata for the Hamburg merchant Alexander Richter and Rosina Brigitta Guden".

An amazing find--thanks for posting, Kim!

 

Telemann - Trauer-Music eines kunsterfahrenen Canarienvogels (TVWV 20:37)

Charles Francis wrote (September 30, 2012):
There are various links between Bach and Telemann that might motivate this post and although I generally don't rate such "modern" composers, this is definitely worth a listen.

Background info (German): http://www.klassik-heute.de/kh/3cds/20100305_19616.shtml

Performance extract by Dorothee Mields, Bach Concentus, Ewald Demeyere: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oXwd5Vg5L8Q

Complete performance by Fischer-Dieskau (transcription?):
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DDU3D4dCG2I
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xWyUxts6vn8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yGIK1_q6CKc

 

Telemann's Helden Music

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 22, 2012):
Georg Philipp Telemann had the uncanny knack of capturing any abstract term or "thing" in music. Of course, opera and cantata texts were the ultimate source of his inspiration, but just give him the twelve virtues, and he would write an entire piece of music out of it. In 1728, he published (and engraved them himself in copper-plate) a set of pieces called Heroic Music (or 12 marches) for harpsichord 2 oboes, and horns or trumpets. In the 1960s, organist E. Power Biggs and the New England Brass teamed up for a recording on Columbia Records, and I finally got around to making it available online (there isn't a single copy of thversion on Youtube). Enjoy! You can click on the sprocket icon to get the best HD by clicking on it after the video starts).

Unfortunately there was only one single print of Telemann's 1728 edition that survived up until WW2 (it was in the Königsberg university library, which was heavily destroyed by Soviet forces in 1944. An edition was apparently prepared from that source, but as an arranged for keyboard, and a single treble instrument (violin, oboe, trumpet), and was finally published in the early 1950s in Berlin. This recording uses as its basis that 1950s version, but composer Daniel Pinkham tastefully added some percussion and some call / responses to the two trumpet players that no doubt were in the original edition. Baroque trumpets could not play the oboe lines however, to be clear. But the music is glorious!

The video is available at YouTube. http://youtu.be/dcpcEXv9zRQ

 

OT: Bach's peers / G. Ph. Telemann's "Musique héroïque ou XII Marches"

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (December 22, 2012):
Georg Philipp Telemann had the uncanny knack of capturing any abstract term or "thing" in music. Of course, opera and cantata texts were the ultimate source of his inspiration, but just give him the twelve virtues, and he would write an entire piece of music out of it. In 1728, he published (and engraved them himself in copper-plate) a set of pieces called Heroic Music (or 12 marches) for harpsichord 2 oboes, and horns or trumpets. In the 1960s, organist E. Power Biggs and the New England Brass Ensemble teamed up for a recording on Columbia Records, and I finally got around to making it available online (there isn't a single copy of this version on Youtube). Enjoy! You can click on the sprocket icon to get the best HD by clicking on it after the video starts).

Unfortunately there was only one known single print of Telemann's 1728 edition that survived up until WW2 (it was in the Königsberg university library, which was heavily destroyed by Soviet forces in 1944. An edition was apparently prepared from that source, but as an arranged for keyboard, and a single treble instrument (violin, oboe, trumpet), and was finally published in the early 1950s in Berlin when paper became available for commercial publishing. This recording uses as its basis that 1950s edition, but for the Columbia Records album, composer Daniel Pinkham tastefully added some percussion and some call / responses to the two trumpet players that no doubt were in the original edition. A cautionary note: Baroque trumpets could not play the oboe lines that you hear in this recording (and purists will fuss no doubt), but the music is glorious!

Even though the music has no obvious connection to Christmas, my local classical radio station in Norfolk Virginia (WGH-FM then became public radio WHRO/WHRV) would typically play this recording during the Yuletide season.

The video is available at YouTube. http://youtu.be/dcpcEXv9zRQ

Happy Holidays and to your loved ones

 

Georg Philipp Telemann: Short Biography | G.P. Telemann - Use of Chorale Melodies in his works | G.P. Telemann - His Autobiography (Hamburg, 1740) | Georg Philipp Telemann & Bach - Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3
Cantata BWV 141 | Cantata BWV 160 | Cantata BWV 218 | Cantata BWV 219 | Passions-Pasticcio BWV 1088 | Motet Jauchzet dem Herrn, alle Welt, BWV Anh 160 | Cantata Hier ist mein Herz, geliebter Jesu, TWV 1:795 | Cantata Ich freue mich im Herren, TWV 1:826 | Cantata Machet die Tore weit (I), TWV 1:074 | Cantata Der Herr ist König, TWV 8:6 | Brockes Passion, TWV 5:1 | Passions-Oratorium Seliges Erwägen, TWV 5:2 | Music

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Last update: ęDecember 30, 2012 ę14:02:19