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Arias in Bach's Vocal Works
Part 2

Continue from Part 1

Slightly OT: Urgent need - Aria for (ideally) soprano and trumpet w/continuo

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 23, 2005):
Trying to put together the program for the rest of the season with my ensemble, need a Baroque aria with trumpet:

- ideally for soprano and trumpet with just continuo, OR (failing that)

- for alto or tenor;

- can be strings with the trumpet in addition to continuo;

- not BWV 51/1 - 'Jauchzet...' - we just did that in November, I'd prefer to wait until at least next season before doing it again;

- can be other composer besides JS Bach.

Any ideas? Awaiting input.

Take care and God bless you

Dale Gedcke wrote (January 23, 2005):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] Have you considered using Händel's "Let the Bright Seraphim"? It is an excellent selection for soprano and either a D trumpet or a piccolo A trumpet. On a piccolo A trumpet one has to swap the 3rd and 4th valve slides to play the two lowest notes, concert A and G. But it is feasible.

There is a recording of this by Wynton Marsalis (Classical Wynton) if you want to hear how it sounds.

For the complete score for Soprano, trumpet, 1st & 2nd violins, viola and cello go to: http://www.rkingmusic.com/, or http://www.dmamusic.org/tromba/. I obtained the score from the latter source.

The words to this composition by Händel are not outstanding, but the interplay between the soprano and the trumpet is brilliant when performed well.

Good luck!

Doug Cowling wrote (January 23, 2005):
Dale Gedcke wrote:
< Have you considered using Händel's "Let the Bright Seraphim"? It is an excellent selection for soprano and either a D trumpet or a piccolo A trumpet. On a piccolo A trumpet one has to swap the 3rd and 4th valve slides to play the two lowest notes, concert A and G. But it is feasible. >
The chorus, "Let Their Celestial Concerts All Unite: was intended to follow the aria attacca.

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Dale Gedcke] Thanks for input, as well as for advice on what to do with the piccolo to get it to play the low notes. I am the type who picks the words first and the music second (that's how I happened on 'Jauchzet...' :) ), so I am attempting to find the words on the Net (so far without success). That having been said, I have a FANTASTIC trumpeter at my disposal (and imagine he's still got 2 or 3 more years yet to go at conservatory!); I figure if Pawel and I can manage 'Jauchzet...' (with me conducting the orchestra while singing, no less!), we can handle just about anything...

Now I have another question: in my search for the words to 'Let the bright seraphim', I came across a Bach aria called 'Seufzer Tranen Kummer Not', which was listed on a CD by Kathleen Battle and Wynton Marsalis. It seems to me this aria ought to be in one of the cantatas, but for some reason it didn't come up in my search on the Complete Bach Cantatas web site. Anyone know where to find it?

Neil Halliday wrote (January 24, 2005):
Cara Emily Thornton wrote:
<"I came across a Bach aria called 'Seufzer Tranen Kummer Not', which was listed on a CD by Kathleen Battle and Wynton Marsalis".>
Dear Cara, check this page out. There might be several examples of what you are looking for: http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/~wfb/cantatas/minst27.html

Neil Halliday wrote (January 24, 2005):
Cara Emily Thornton wrote:
"I came across a Bach aria called 'Seufzer Tranen Kummer Not', which was listed on a CD by Kathleen Battle and Wynton Marsalis. It seems to me this aria ought to be in one of the cantatas >

http://www.cs.ualberta.ca/~wfb/cantatas/movements_S.html

This movement is BWV 21/3 and has an oboe, not trumpet.

Anna Vriend wrote (January 24, 2005):
Seufzer Tranen Kummer Not

< Now I have another question: in my search for the words to 'Let the bright seraphim', I came across a Bach aria called 'Seufzer Tranen Kummer Not', which was listed on a CD by Kathleen Battle and Wynton Marsalis. It seems to me this aria ought to be in one of the cantatas, but for some reason it didn't come up in my search on the Complete Bach Cantatas web site. Anyone know where to find it? >
It is from BWV 21 "Ich hatte viel Bekümmernis".

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Neil Halliday] In other words, Battle and Marsalis are taking liberties? :D

Doug Cowling wrote (January 23, 2005):
Cara Emily Thornton wrote:
< In other words, Battle and Marsalis are taking liberties? :D >
The performances are gorgeous but there are all kinds of arrangements. The best is the wonderful adagio introduction to Händel's Birthday Ode for Queen Anne which is scored for counter-tenor and trumpet which Battle takes up an octave. Throws the octave contrast out of whack, but she does sing mighty fine.

If Kathleen Battle married Emmanuel Ax, she would be Kathleen Battle Ax ...

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Anna Vriend] Thank you for info!

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Doug Cowling] Aha. Well, I don't want to stray TOO far from the original here. It may be, however, that this aria would be the answer to another question I had about the balance of this season, namely: 'What am I going to do with my oboist if she can't get hold of an oboe d'amore to do 'Saget, saget' from the Easter Oratorio? (BWV 249)' (not necessarily for Easter in this case). Am presently downloading the cantata to see whether this item is suitable - I mean, the instrumentation sure looks good - soprano, oboe and continuo (ever noticed how it becomes exponentially more difficult to schedule rehearsals with each person you add to the ensemble for a given performance?).

Cara T (with a name like that, I'd find myself in good company with Kathleen Battle Ax...)

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Neil Halliday] Thank you for input. It seems I'm on the right track here.

Dale Gedcke wrote (January 24, 2005):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] The words to G. F. Händel's "Let the Bright Seraphim" are:

"Let the bright Seraphim in burning row,
their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,

Let the bright Seraphim in burning row,
in burning, burning row,
their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,
their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,
their loud, their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,

Let the bright Seraphim in burning row,
in burning, burning row,
their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,
their loud, uplifted angel trumpets blow,

Let the Cherubic host, in tuneful choirs,
touch their immortal harps with golden wires,

Let the Cherubic host, in tuneful choirs,
touch their immortal harps,
touch their immortal harps with golden wires,
touch their immortal harps with golden wires."


The words are not terribly intriguing. But the interplay between the trumpet and soprano is simply beautiful!

Bradley Lehman wrote (January 24, 2005):
OT: Let the Bright Seraphim

< The words are not terribly intriguing. But the interplay between the trumpet and soprano is simply beautiful! >
Certainly a popular showpiece. I had to conduct it from the harpsichord in college for a classmate's recital (with an OPPP string ensemble and trumpet) and some other times later accompanying various singers with only piano. Enjoyable and sparkling piece, with lots of opportunity for the singer and trumpet player to echo one another and draw out the tempos, where the rest of the orchestra is tacet. I like doing the middle section at almost the same tempo as the rest of it, instead of slowing way down there, as is commonly done. There's so much contrast already with the key change and texture, it doesn't need to drag waa-a-a-a-aa-y out with the cherubic host.

Bradley Lehman wrote (January 24, 2005):
Farther OT: puns

< If Kathleen Battle married Emmanuel Ax, she would be Kathleen Battle Ax ... >
Or the sjoke about the Ax Ma Mutter piano trio.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 24, 2005):
To Cara Emily Thornton & Anna Vriend] You can find it at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV21-2.htm [M-8] recorded in 1990.
K. Battle recorded this aria for the 2nd time in 1995. See: [M-12] at the same page.

Ludwig wrote (January 23, 2005):
[To Doug Cowling] Why not Mozart Allelulia or was it Vivaldi?

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 23, 2005):
[To Ludwig] Don't know of any Vivaldi Alleluia, Mozart rather not for the moment because a) at least my strings are Baroque b) even if I told them to bring their modern instruments, there's still the problem of scheduling rehearsals for the most probably larger ensemble that would require (most of my folks are still in conservatory) - I thought of doing some Mozart, but next season (that way they'll have the summer to look over all the material for next year), and c) (most importantly) does it have a trumpet solo?

John Pike wrote (January 23, 2005):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] Cantata BWV 21 "Ich Hatte Viel Bekümernis"........wonderful stuff.

Joost wrote (January 25, 2005):
[To Cara Emily Tornton] In Telemann's "Fortsetzung des Harmonischen Gottes-Dienstes" you will find several cantatas for voice, trumpet, violin and bc. The mezzo-soprano Eva Lax with Affetti Musicali recorded a couple of them on Hungaroton HCD 31597 (Der himmlischen Geister unzählbare Menge, TWV 1:298, Ach, reiner Geist! TWV 1:904; Nach Finsternis und Todesschatten, TWV 1:1150). These are of course religious works. Melani and A. Scarlatti wrote quite a number of secular cantatas for soprano, trumpet and bc., some of which have been recorded by Judith Nelson for Harmonia Mundi.

Santu de Silva wrote (January 26, 2005):
Soprano+Trumpet

Perhaps I missed this, but what about the wonderful Soprano solo from Jauchzet Gott in allen Lande (BWV 51)?

 

For 5 Feb. - Bach arias with just continuo accompaniment?

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (January 21, 2006):
Could I ask for recommendations of arias from Bach's cantatas which require just continuo for the accompaniment? Soprano/alto/tenor. Not bass. Epiphany theme would be great - God willing, we're supposed to perform on 5 February (was going to do a fine aria from a Telemann cantata, but there are problems with personnel availability...).

So, as far as JSB goes, we've already done 'Hasse nur' from BWV 80, it's a great piece, but three times in one year might be a bit too much of that good stuff :> Bit early in the year for the Passions, bit late for Advent/Christmas. Any ideas? Awaiting replies...

Thanks and God bless you

Douglas Cowling wrote (January 21, 2006):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] How about the SA duet, "Wir Eilen" from Cantata BWV 78, "Jesu, Der Du Meine Seele"? It's one of Bach's loveliest pieces and always a crowd pleaser.

Aryeh Oron wrote (January 22, 2006):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] Have you considered using the Search Works/Movements utility to find movements that suit your needs?
See: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/INS-Search.htm

Neil Halliday wrote (January 24, 2006):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] Have a look at the tenor aria in BWV 182, which Robertson considers to be "one of the most poignant arias Bach ever wrote".

BTW, the piano arrangement/realisation of the continuo line (available at the BCW) is extremely attractive and well within the capabilities of a competent pianist; I find I am disappointed by most of the available recordings after learning this part and singing along myself, because the usual presentation of the bare, angular, cello line with an under-developed or obscure/inaudible harpsichord or organ realisation, seems totally inadquate in comparison to the marvellous harmonic structure of this piano part supporting the voice.

It's possible the above remarks apply to recordings only, where compression issues invariably reduce a harpsichord's timbre into a mere pitchless rattling noise; I suppose in a live situation, harpsichord or organ, given a creative realisation of the figured bass, might be effective in the more usual basso continuo instrumentation with bass strings.

 

Continuo arias Mädchen die von harten Sinnen

Richard Mix wrote (September 13, 2006):
I cant remember who it was, but someone a while back suggested discussing continuo realisations, focussing on continuo-only arias. It seemed a great idea to me, but it's taken me a while to respond. May I propose Slendrian's 2nd aria from BWV 211? There is some urgency to this request, as I have a performance this Saturday with a non-figurereading pianist, and the breitkopf piano score is, well, ludicrous, exploiting the voice's run in bar 44 as a constant thread in the texture. Has anyone seen the Bärenreiter part, and will Stutgardt/Carus tackle the secular works? Is there anything else I might be overlooking?

Aryeh has kindly posted the first page of my first draft at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/BWV211-M6.pdf

For the time being I'm following the B-G, which seems to have added parenthetical figures, which I've omitted. The source would seem to be a separate part, as the score, available in facs., is unfigured throughout. As can be seen I've made guesses of my own on vertical alignment and thrown in a few figues of my own to taste. I'm rather unhappy w/ the downbeat of 9, but getting anything finished by tomorrow's rehearsal is a priority...

Bradley Lehman wrote (September 13, 2006):
Richard Mix wrote:
< May I propose Slendrian's 2nd aria from BWV 211? There is some urgency to this request, as I have a performance this Saturday with a non-figurereading pianist, (...)
Aryeh has kindly posted the first page of my first draft at
: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/BWV211-M6.pdf >
I'm printing it out for a couple of play-throughs on harpsichord and clavichord. A couple of clarification questions before I respond further with some more detailed advice/suggestions:

- Is your pianist playing on piano, or attempting harpsichord?

- Is your pianist confident to improvise at all beyond your sketch, or do you expect he/she will be playing your realization literally?

Thx,

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 13, 2006):
Richard Mix wrote:
< May I propose Slendrian's 2nd aria from BWV 211? There is some urgency to this request, as I have a performance this Saturday with a non-figurereading pianist, and the breitkopf piano score is, well, ludicrous, exploiting the voice's run in bar 44 as a constant thread in the texture. Has anyone seen the Bärenreiter part, and will Stutgardt/Carus tackle the secular works? Is there anything else I might be overlooking? >
I was always accused by my harmony teacher of over-composing realizations of figured basses. My immediate impulse with this kind of aria is to shadow the rhythm of bass with mirror 10ths in the right hand either in consecutive or contrary motion. For instance, I would have runnning eighths in those antiphonal appogiatura figures in the first three bars and realize it much as Bach does with the sighing figures in the opening Kyrie of the B Minor Mass (BWV 232). I would jump to have consecutive tenths in the bar where the voice enters.

But then "fussy" and "over-composed" are the most frequent comments I receive about my realizations.

Bradley Lehman wrote (September 13, 2006):
[Continue of his previous message]
....I'll go ahead with the further comments anyway, since my play-through is done and I have mostly general remarks that could apply also to other pieces (and effective continuo practice in general).

- Overall, an excellent start! Very easy to sight-read from and the hand motions are natural ones. In a pinch (if performing it withsinger) I could use this score as-is, with only one or two play-throughs, as I never stick very closely to literal reading anyway (when playing improvised continuo). This is the right level of sketching, in my opinion. Keep it up in this same general style for the remaining three pages!

- I have about a dozen tiny details (adding or deleting notes, changing a few figures, etc) that I have scanned on a penciled copy of this first page -- I'm sending that directly to the person who asked, off-list.

- #1 job, whether the keyboardist is playing harpsichord or piano, and whether or not it's a realized or improvised part: the focus must be on the bass line and making it sound like an expressive line. Phrasing, accentuation, and any dynamics of extra stress or softening are within that main goal. The right hand's role, then, is to help that process rather than distracting from it. This start of a realization is already doing excellent work in that regard.

- Accordingly, at the end of bar 10 and the middle of bar 13, I'd add a chord on each of the bass line's pickup notes rather than leaving them naked. It will help the rhythmic drive of that line, instead of having the pickup note sound like a weak and isolated phenomenon.

- There were two spots of parallel 5ths, indeed whole parallel triads, in the right hand -- one of them sounds unobtrusive and OK, while the other one needs just a slight alteration to sound smoother. (Marked in the copy.) The point of avoiding parallel triads is to avoid a sound of "chunkiness"--which is already a problem (often) when pianists play continuo, not lightening-up the right hand enough.

- As early as bar 2, and in similar spots, whenever the bass line has its leaps up to unexpected notes followed by step motion and the slur: I'd be more bold putting a chord on the off-beat note to help emphasize both its surprise and its accent. Interesting stuff between the beats is always more interesting to listen to, and grabs the listeners more directly, than a too-predictable placing of chords only on strong beats. The strong beats are already strong because of their placement within the metric regularity, and don't need extra emphasis. Saying this another way: approach it sort of like jazz, not making it sound like jazz, but in the emphasis on surprising off-beat stuff now and then...and it still has to "swing" whether it's jazz or not. "Swing" is about surprise and accentuation, not rhythmic alteration. Bar 5 is another good place to try some more of this offbeat accentuation.

- I also like to add an extra chord, for added rhythmic vigor, in places such as bar 10 going into the cadence. Add a chord over the 6-5 there, and the cadence will sound even stronger because the rhythmic motion in the right hand would then be speeding up before hitting the B major chord.

- I firmly applaud the inclusion of all the implied figures, even if the pianist is going to ignore them. They clarify the music so strongly!

- If it were me playing from this for the performance, I'd add all my own suggestions instinctively from this sketch and hardly bother to write them in. Also I'd do a bit of mordenting and a few passing tones between the beats, here and there, again to help the accentuation and provide variety. But, I can't write these out; I improvise them differently every time and the process is an intuitive one. The more you can get your keyboardist to play intuitively by listening and reacting, rather than sitting down to figure things out, the better.

- If the pianist is going to be playing things too literally, also consider sticking some eighth-rests between some of your chords, to make sure the thing is crisp rather than plodding....

- Remind the pianist yet again that it's bass line, and not to play "right-handed" at all. In rehearsal, it actually helps to have the keyboardist play ONLY the left hand for the first couple of run-throughs, to phrase as much as possible with that hand alone and to get the concept of the accentuation to be as strong as possible that way. The right hand is just icing on the cake, to help that process, while thinking "left-handedly" as much as possible. During the performance, too: think left-handedly.

- Again, bravo all round. Keep it up for the remaining pages!

Good luck with the performance,

Tom Hens wrote (September 14, 2006):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< But then "fussy" and "over-composed" are the most frequent comments I receive about my realizations. >
You mean, something like what J.A. Scheibe wrote?

"Dieser grosse Mann würde die Bewunderung ganzer Nazionen seyn, when er mehr Annehmlichkeit hätte, und wenn er nicht seinen Stücken durch ein schwülstiges und verworrenes Wesen das Natürliche entzöge, und ihre Schönheit durch allzu grosse Kunst verdunkelte".
(I know I should provide a translation, but I'm too lazy to make one of my own right now and I'm sure it must be in the Bach Reader in English somewhere
-- it's in Bach-Dokumente Vol. II p. 400.)

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 13, 2006):
Tom Hens wrote:
< und ihre Schönheit durch allzu grosse Kunst verdunkelte". >
That's me!

Doug der Verdunlkler!

Ed Myskoeski wrote (September 13, 2006):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
< - Again, bravo all round. Keep it up for the remaining pages!
Good luck with the performance, >

I second the good luck wishes (or, break a leg, if you are superstitious). For the record, I enjoyed reading all the performance details on this thread, not totally lost on the casual listener. Much more on-topic than the Darwin thread.

My apologies for prolonging that one, as Ludwig pointed out to me. But it did have a few entertaining moments of humor and absurdity, perhaps even the odd bit of accurate history and philosophy. Clearly way OT, nonetheless.

Thomas Braatz wrote (September 13, 2006):
Tom Hens wrote:
>>You mean, something like what J.A. Scheibe wrote?
"Dieser grosse Mann würde die Bewunderung gan[t]zer Naz[t not z]ionen seyn, when er mehr Annehmlichkeit hätte, und wenn er nicht seinen Stücken durch ein schwülstiges und verworrenes Wesen das Natürliche entzöge, und ihre Schönheit durch allzu[no space]grosse Kunst verdunkelte".<<
My version of Bach-Dokumente Vol. II p. 400 [actually item 400 on p. 286] seems to have some differing orthography [noted in brackets above]. The translation is found in "The New Bach Reader", Norton, 1998, p. 338, item 343 and appears as follows:

"This great man would be the admiration of whole nations if he had more amenity, if he did not take away the natural element in his pieces by giving them a turgid and confused style, and if he did not darken their beauty by an excess of art."

Bradley Lehman wrote (September 14, 2006):
Richard Mix wrote:
< Aryeh has kindly posted the first page of my first draft at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/BWV211-M6.pdf >
How's it going? And, what software package allows the inclusion of such nice-looking continuo figures? I have an aging copy of Finale that doesn't allow me to enter any figures...I always have to write them in by hand, which doesn't take long but is a pain, and gets lost in any updates or reprints. Need an upgrade sometime to a package that takes the needs of Baroque musicians into account!

Even better, does your package handle continuo figure transposition?

Richard Mix wrote (September 16, 2006):
Many thanks to Brad for his keen eye as well as his kind encouragement. I'm rather busy but re page 1 (posted at: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Scores/BWV211-M6.pdf)

The sharp in bar 2, beat 3 is in parentheses in BG; it is w/o any disclaimer in NBA but the fine print says the opening rit. has been "completed" by the figuring in the closing rit. I havnt figured out how to reconstruct the original from the crit. notes yet...
Bar 6/beat 2 absolutely requires a cautionary G natural.
Bar 8 in NBA has 4/3 on the last note!
Bar 15 I decided to move the 6 to the 4th quaver, but NBA puts it on the 2nd.
Rather a pity they devoted their one page of facsimile space to a vln. part...

I'd love to see Doug's essay and orhear recomended recordings. One of the broader issues is whether to highlight the 'cello as I am attempting or to go the Heinichen route and make a two part (well, 3 part) invention. Ton Koopman does this quite well in the Youtube videos of Gewaltige stoesst Gott and Quia fecit, but he does still have the lute plunk out some plain chords.

The software is Sibelius 3.1; figuring is very buggy although I'm assured by support that Sib 4 is much improved (!) Sibelius can import Finale and Midi for further editing, but is not open source and hard to share except by pdf. I got a frantic call from a conductor who couldn't get parts to print w/ the Scorch plugin, and as I hadnt upgraded and couldn't help, the next day's rehearsal had to be cancelled.

Must ruch to dress rehearsal...

Tom Hens wrote (September 20, 2006):
Thomas Braatz wrote:
< My version of Bach-Dokumente Vol. II p. 400 [actually item 400 on p. 286] >
Sorry, sorry, my bad! When transplanting the quote from something I wrote years ago, I incorrectly expanded "II/400" into "Vol. II p. 400" instead of "Vol. II No. 400", as I should have done.

For suitable punishment, I will now go and spank myself thoroughly with an eighteenth-century document that is now lost to us.

 

Learning the arias

Julian Mincham wrote (February 28, 2007):
I have found the comments by the experienced singers on the learning of such arias as those in BWV 92 most interesting.

A brief summary seems to be that

1 an experienced professional COULD produce a reasonable and accurate performance at very short notice

2 But a deeply 'musical' performance would take longer with more time required to really 'get inside' the piece

3 that more time would be preferable (my own piano teacher would often say, after the notes had been learnt 'yes but now it need 'PLAYING IN''---all musicians understand that.)

4 that this is not something one would wish to do week after week.

Of course this doesn't PROVE anything about Bach performances but it is indicative and raises some interesting questions. Would (as Neil touch upon) Bach really be satisfied with little more than a 'notes only' performances each week? ---his music is, after all, so rich in musical expression. What about having to learn an aria, a recitative and perhaps a difficult chorus line in very short time week after week? Were the training methods of the musicians very differnt from that which we are familiar with today?

I touched upon the last point in an earlier posting (unfortunately not carefully read by everyone) when I intimated that vocal expectation (and by implication, training) had substantially changed over the period of my own career. How much more so in the (almost) 300 years since Bach's early years at Leipzig. And it is perhaps worth bearing in mind that, although there are different views about the REGULARITY of Bach's cantata composition, it cannot be denied that the choirs and singers PERFORMED almost 120 cantatas (+SJP, EO etc.) --new to them if not to Bach---in the first two Leipzig cycle years--a phenominal rate of music making.!

Many thanks to the singers on list who gave of their experience to contribute to this discussion. I, for one, have learnt from it.

Ed Myskowski wrote (February 28, 2007):
Julian Minchasm wrote:
< I have found the comments by the experienced singers on the learning of such arias as those in BWV 92 most interesting.
[...]
Many thanks to the singers on list who gave of their experience to contribute to this discussion. I, for one, have learnt from it. >
And thanks for posing the question which stimulated the responses. Sharing of performance (and performance preparation!) experience is perhaps the most unique contribution of BCML, especially informative for those of us on the audience side of the relationship.

 

Looking for a type of movement

Chris Kern wrote (November 14, 2007):
I'm looking for more examples of a type of movement I really like, which is a solo voice singing a chorale, with obbligato instruments. Examples of this type of movement are in BWV 6, BWV 36, BWV 85, and BWV 92. Are there others?

Nicholas Johnson wrote (November 14, 2007):
[To Chris Kern] BWV 93 has a soprano aria with oboe. The chorale enters later at bar 23.

There is a particularly good recording with Agnes Mellon under Philippe Herreweghe.

The oboeist is also excellent

 

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