Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

Members of the Bach Cantatas Mailing List
Part 9: Year 2007

Short Introduction - Georg Fischer from Black Forest / Germany - liturgical names of Sundays 1685-1750

Georg Fischer wrote (January 30, 2007):
when searching for websites linking to my site at www.punctum.com, I found a reference to my calendar program which was posted by Douglas Cowling in this group.

I'm 59, a computer consultant, and still working at a major German bank in Frankfurt am Main. My knowledge of music, even of scores, is rather limited, though I'm singing (Bass) once per week in the evangelic church choir at my home town in southern Germany, in a small choir in Frankfurt, and sometimes in the local catholic church choir (they also sing J.S.Bach sometimes). During the years I sung BWV 79, BWV 93, BWV 106, BWV 140, BWV 182.
-------
I've now listed the Sundays in Bach's lifetime with their liturgical (lutheran/protestant) names on: http://gfis.dataway.ch/teherba.de/bach/index.html

If you klick on a year, you can see the Sundays, and if you klick on a Sunday name there, you will see all years where that Sunday occurred.

Please do not hesitate to email me directly if you find any inconsistencies with your dates.

I adhere to the hypothesis that Bach would have planned his cantatas along the annual lists of bible texts to be used during the service ("Perikopen" in German). At least now, these are fixed for all Evangelic (Lutheran/Reformed/United) churchs in Germany, and they repeat after 6 years. They probably existed also at Bach's time, but I did not yet find out whether they were common in a town or region.
-------
Moreover I can offer reading of the old German handwriting script, since I'm used to it (to some extent) from genealogical research for other (mainly American) people.

 

Introduction

John Pike wrote (February 25, 2007):
I have rejoined all 3 groups. For those of you who may have joined since I left last summer (due to being overwhelmed with other commitments), I am writing to introduce myself. I am a General Practitioner in Bristol, UK. I am also a keen amateur violinist, and have loved Bach's music since I was a small child. It is as important to me as the air I breathe.

However, for the past few months I have been playing a lot of Mozart (which I also love) at home and in chamber music groups. On CD, I have listened to music by mainly other composers. Last week, I received the latest volume (22) in John Eliot Gardiner's Bach cantata pilgrimage, SDG 128. Listening to it felt like a sort of home-coming after so many months away from the great master. It includes 6 cantatas for Easter, 2 each for Easter Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, and very magnificent works they are too. I particularly love BWV 66 "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen". The recordings of BWV 6 and 66 are different from those recorded in 1999 for DG, and the soloists are different. The latest release was recorded at St George's church, Eisenach, the town of Bach's birth, of course, and the church in which he was baptised (the original font is still there). I think they are very fine recordings. I know that not everyone on this list appreciates Gardiner's approach, but I am sure we would all agree that the music itself is unspeakably sublime. Listening to it was one of the reasons which compelled me to rejoin these lists, which I have missed a lot.

Earlier this month, my wife gave birth to a stillborn baby, an ordeal very similar to ones which Bach himself had to face far too often, and it is Bach that I turn to for consolation at such times. Indeed, a list member very kindly sent me a Bach recording when he heard our news. Bach manages to convey something of the deepest emotions of the human spirit which words can never do.

It is very good indeed to be back.

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (February 25, 2007):
[To John Pike] Oh, hullo John! I had just been wondering in the past few days how you were getting on. I am shocked and sorry to hear the news about your child. I pray and trust that you, your wife and other loved ones are being blessed with the peace of God in your hearts. It's nice to see you back!

Julian Mincham wrote (February 25, 2007):
John Pike wrote:
< Earlier this month, my wife gave birth to a stillborn baby, an ordeal very similar to ones which Bach himself had to face far too often, and it is Bach that I turn to for consolation at such times. Indeed, a list member very kindly sent me a Bach recording when he heard our news. Bach manages to convey something of the deepest emotions of the human spirit which words can never do.It is very good indeed to be back. >
Wecome back.

I think you express so much of that which many of us feel about Bach's soothing of the spirit which we all need at different time of our lives.

I do feel strongly that Bach helps us in so many areas of loss that life visits upon us.

I hope you will, as I do, continue to find interest in the list and feel that you might like to contribute to it form time to time.

 

A Brief Introduction

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (February 25, 2007):
I wanted to introduce myself with a few words, but first a generous thank you for a wonderful website and resource.

I have been in love with baroque music since I was first exposed to it as a teenager. Nonesuch Records were a staple in my learning experiences with Bach and Telemann and Fasch.

I discovered the Bach cantatas via the Teldec albums and looked for them eagerly when a new release was mentioned in record review magazines. I still cherish those recordings greatly.

Currently I'm preparing modern performing editions of Christoph Graupner's ouvertures and sinfonias to be published by Brian Clark's Prima la musica! Hopefully this will be a complete edition of the orchestral music, but there's so much of it! I hope to expand this to quite a few of the Graupner cantatas with at least 2 Christmas cantatas by June of this year.

Again I thank you for a wonderful website and resource

yours in music

 

Introduction

John Pike wrote (February 25, 2007):
I have rejoined all 3 groups. For those of you who may have joined since I left last summer (due to being overwhelmed with other commitments), I am writing to introduce myself. I am a General Practitioner in Bristol, UK. I am also a keen amateur violinist, and have loved Bach's music since I was a small child. It is as important to me as the air I breathe.

However, for the past few months I have been playing a lot of Mozart (which I also love) at home and in chamber music groups. On CD, I have listened to music by mainly other composers. Last week, I received the latest volume (22) in John Eliot Gardiner's Bach cantata pilgrimage, SDG 128. Listening to it felt like a sort of home-coming after so many months away from the great master. It includes 6 cantatas for Easter, 2 each for Easter Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, and very magnificent works they are too. I particularly love BWV 66 "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen". The recordings of BWV 6 and BWV 66 are different from those recorded in 1999 for DG, and the soloists are different. The latest release was recorded at St George's church, Eisenach, the town of Bach's birth, of course, and the church in which he was baptised (the original font is still there). I think they are very fine recordings. I know that not everyone on this list appreciates Gardiner's approach, but I am sure we would all agree that the music itself is unspeakably sublime. Listening to it was one of the reasons which compelled me to rejoin these lists, which I have missed a lot.

Earlier this month, my wife gave birth to a stillborn baby, an ordeal very similar to ones which Bach himself had to face far too often, and it is Bach that I turn to for consolation at such times. Indeed, a list member very kindly sent me a Bach recording when he heard our news. Bach manages to convey something of the deepest emof the human spirit which words can never do.

It is very good indeed to be back.

Josh Klasinski wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To John Pike] These are wonderful thoughts from you Dr. Pike and I too feel the same about Bach. Recently I watchted two cantatas on Dvd from Gardiner's pilgramage and completely fell in love with performances and especially the music. Cantata 199 must be one of the most sublime, spirtitual, and beautiful pieces for voice and instruments.

John Pike wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To Josh Klasinski] Hi Josh, and many thanks. I absolutely agree with you about BWV 199 and about Gardiner's superlative performance of it, thanks in no small part to Kozena's deeply moving singing.

Josh Klasinski wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To John Pike] Out of curiosity and since you are a violinist have you ever played or heard the marvelous canon from Bach's Weinnachts oratorio in which the main theme is taken by two violins? The words "Ich will nur dir zu ehren leben" begin and form the main theme of the canon.

John Pike wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To Josh Klasinski] Indeed, I know it very well by ear, but have never played it. It sounds very difficult. It is one of my wife's favourite movements of Bach.

Shelly wrote (February 26, 2007):
Josh Klasinski wrote:
< Out of curiosity and since you are a violinist have you ever played or heard the marvelous canon from Bach's Weinnachts oratorio..... >
Please pardon my lack of knowledge, but is that the Christmas Oratorio?

Josh Klasinski wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To Shelly] It sure is Shelly, one of the greatest oratorio's IMHO ever written, a newfound tradition for me each Christmas.

Josh Klasiniski wrote (February 26, 2007):
[To John Pike] Indeed the rhythm and tempo of the canon would make for difficult but ultimately loads of fun playing.

Shelly wrote (February 27, 2007):
[To Josh Klasinski] Thanks Josh- what is your favorite recording?

Josh Klasinski wrote (February 27, 2007):
[To Shelly] Fav recording of the Oratorio?, well I have only heard Sir John Eliot Gardiner's performance (many times over), so that would be my favorite for the time being ; )

Robert Sherman wrote (February 27, 2007):
[To Shelly] Shelly, I have a half-dozen recordings of the XO and very strongly recommend the one by Enoch zu Guttenberg. None of his soloists are big names except for trumpeter Haakern Hardenberger, but the performance is absolutely thrilling.

The second Richter recording is worthwhile for Wunderlich's exceptional
Evangelist, but otherwise it's not on the level of Guttenberg.

 

Perform cantatas together via web conference?

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (February 26, 2007):
I just had a really fun idea! I wonder if we could get together a small (if only OVPP/OPPP) orchestra and choir from folks on the list, and use technology to link up and read/perform cantatas together over the web? We could of course record the performances and upload them to BCW :D Heck, if we wanted, we could even webcast the performances live, invite our friends to listen in!

So, for example, we'd have Brad play continuo in Michigan, John play violin in England, there's a trumpeter somewhere on the list, we'd have a soprano in Poland, I think we must have a male alto on the list somewhere, but I don't remember who or where, there's a number of tenors that I recall, and... a bass? As I recall, we've got at least one of those too... How about some more instruments? And then there's the matter of a Kapellmeister...

I'm sure the technology exists to do this, so the only question is: Is anyone game, and if so, what would be the technological and other parameters we'd have to have in place to do it? Awaiting replies.

Bradley Lehman wrote (February 26, 2007):
< I just had a really fun idea! I wonder if we could get together a small (if only OVPP/OPPP) orchestra and choir from folks on the list, and use technology to link up and read/perform cantatas together over the web? We could of course record the performances and upload them to BCW :D Heck, if we wanted, we could even webcast the performances live, invite our friends to listen in! >
Smacks of John Cage's piece "Indeterminacy" where people are doing things in different rooms simultaneously, and part of the point is that they can't hear one another at all; only the recording device hears the simultaneous events and puts them together. I recall there was also somebody's movie called "Time Code" that did something similar, shooting all the scenes in real time and simultaneously, and then displayed as a split-screen. Wild.

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (February 27, 2007):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
< Smacks of John Cage's piece "Indeterminacy" where people are doing things in different rooms simultaneously, and part of the point is that they can't hear one another at all; >
Try to play Bach cantatas without hearing each other? God forbid! But I thought that was the point of web conferencing - that participants are able to hear each other in real time.

< only the recording device hears the simultaneous events and puts them together. I recall there was also somebody's movie called "Time Code" that did something similar, shooting all the scenes in real time and simultaneously, and then displayed as a split-screen. Wild. >
Displaying the ensemble on split screen, I can live with. It's probably a necessity that all of the ensemble members have that capability, actually. The rest of that wildness, at least for Bach cantatas, I can live without ;;)

 

Intruducing Myself

Tom Lock wrote (March 17, 2007):
I have been following the discussions of the Bach Cantatas with delight for close to a year now and have decided to join in the discussions.

My name is Tom Lock. I can hopefully bring some insights to this group as I am not only a Lutheran pastor (4 years+) in the LCMS, but I am also a trained musician (and composer) with a MCM (1991) from Concordia University - River Forest. I have been serving in the LCMS either as a musician or pastor for over 20 years.

Please bear with me if I make mistakes in protocol; I have never joined a discussion group before today.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (March 17, 2007):
Tom Lock wrote:
< My name is Tom Lock. I can hopefully bring some insights to this group as I am not only a Lutheran pastor (4 years+) in the LCMS, but I am also a trained musician (and composer) with a MCM (1991) from Concordia University - River Forest. I have been serving in the LCMS either as a musician or pastor for over 20 years. >
I gather that LCMS = Lutheran Church Missouri Synod. Welcome to our group. We cannot expect all of us to understand such abbreviations. I--as the resident Jewish, non-theist-- happen to have more exposure to such arcana than most Americans who are not of the traditions in question.

 

Modern choir schools

Philip Legge wrote (March 22, 2007):
As this is my first posting to the list, I thought I should briefly introduce myself - I'm an amateur musician working in Melbourne; I'm known as a singer (counter-tenor/high tenor), musicologist, editor of music (120 scores posted to CPDL.org, some orchestral scores to be published by UMP Co. (UK)), and sometime conductor, arranger, and very occasionally, composer...
<>

Ed Myskowski wrote (March 22, 2007):
<> Welcome, and thanks for the post, the more the merrier.

 

Introducing myself [BRML]

Neil Walker wrote (April 30, 2007):
Finding this group yesterday made me very happy. Entering "two violins concerto" in Google led to a fascinating discussion of the concerto in D minor (http://www.bach-cantatas.com/MD/MD-BWV1043-DoubleViolin.htm) that led me eventually to BachRecordings.

I have loved the music of Bach since childhood. The vinyl of E.Power Biggs's recording, Bach Organ Favorites and the DG recording of Igor and David Oistrakh playing the D minor conerto for two violins withstood admirably the almost daily playing of these pieces while I was in high school and university. They must have made sturdy vinyl recordings in those days because these two records retain most of their original sound quality.

Muby many other composers and in many other genres also finds a large place in my collections; however, one area in which I am deficient is 1980's rock -- for the entire decade, I listened almost exclusively to bluegrass music, both traditional and modern.

What a pleasure to discover a group where the music of Bach receives sensitive and intelligent treatment by those who appreciate this great composer. The group appears to include both amateurs and those very learnèd in music and in the music of Bach.

Another pleasure for me is that here, music takes centre stage, not the equipment used to listen to it.

A word of explanation is appropriate here -- I have reviewed audio gear for several online magazines such as SoundStage, Enjoy the Music and American Wired. Several of my articles will appear shortly in Enjoy The Music, a magazine whose major focus is on audio equipment but whose title reflects its philosophy -- the reason for good audio equipment is to Enjoy The Music (www.enjoythemusic.com).

If you are familiar with the world of the audiophile, you know that many audiophiles tend to listen to only a few recordings on their high end outfit, searching for the perfect imaging, the clearest bass, the quickest transient response and so on -- addicts to what another writer calls the "ting and bang" school of music appreciation.

I also enjoy other classical music, opera, jazz, rock, turntablism, pop, folk and alternative. Greek, middle eastern, African, Indian and Asian music also give me great pleasure, although my knowledge and understanding of this music is very thin.

Thanks to those who founded and keep this group and allied groups going -- I look forward to learning a lot, discovering new recordings and enjoying the music of Bach even more.

Anne (Nessie) Russell wrote (April 30, 2007):
[To Neil Walker] Welcome to the group.

 

Introducing myself...

Richard A.A. Larraga [MM, JD; Conductor, http://www.richardlarraga.com] wrote (August 16, 2007):
My name is Richard Larraga and I'm a choral conductor based in Boston, Massachusetts. I'll be conducting Cantata 10 (Meine Seel erhebt den Herrn) this fall at the Longy School of Music in Cambridge. I've conducted a number of cantatas and performed the b minor Mass with one voice per part a few years ago.

While Cara is correct about the use of colla parte in concertos, in the cantatas, colla parte just means the instruments are doubling the vocal parts for support.

Looking forward to some interesting discussions.

Richard A.A. Larraga, MM, JD (http://www.richardlarraga.com) Conductor

* Moses Brown School, Providence, RI (www.mosesbrown.org)
* Longy School of Music, Cambridge, MA (www.longy.edu)
* Sängerchor Boston, Walpole, MA (www.saengerchorboston.org)
* Children's Choir Repertoire & Standards Chair ACDA Massachusetts Chapter (www.massacda.org)
* Board Member ACDA Rhode Island Chapter (www.acdaonline.org/states/RI/)

 

Off-Topic - New Web Site

Jean Laaninen wrote (March 25, 2007):
http://sopranojlaaninen.homestead.com/

Everyone is invited to visit my new web site. Much of it focuses on music and musicians, and I am happy to share some interviews with some up and coming young musicians who are my friends and who have been my teachers. More interviews will be added later this fall. Enjoy.

Russell Telfer wrote (March 25, 2007):
[To Jean Laaninen] Thanks Jean. I've had a good look. It is always interesting to read about the lives of other music makers. I recommend a visit by other members.

I am most interested in music notation programs and will write off list. It would be great if we could pool the BCML's resources on this, but unfortunately it's too far Off Topic to be justifiable, besides which, in my experience notation programs don't handle singing anything like as well as instrumental music, which is in direct conflict with our rules of engagement.

 

Introduction

Jean Terrayre wrote (August 25, 2007):
Introducing myself

I am a french southerner (Bordeaux) mélomaniac. Musical life in Bordeaux is chiefly busy about opera and in what regards sacred music on an area Versailles-Roma-Venice.Bach cantatas are scarcely known beyond the five or six most famous ones..

Only Herreweghe,once a year, through te festival in Saintes is offering oppotunities to discover lesser known cantats. Despite of this I fell completely in the power of Bach cantatas through the acquisition of Harnoncourt-Leonardt monument. From the beginning the theological background did not interest me as much as the" sacred" baroque dramma per musica". The reading of "Opera as drama" by J. Kerman was illuminating. Since then I buy feverishly Rilling, Suzuki, Koopmann, Coin, Herreweghe, S. Kuijken, Junghänel, Gardiner...etc; Thousand different gods and still the same. Arachnean madrigal (Junghänel) or bulky oratorio (G. Ramin) "tout est grâce".

Russell Telfer wrote (August 25, 2007):
Jean Terrayre wrote:
< I am a french southerner (Bordeaux) mélomaniac. Musical life in Bordeaux is chiefly busy about opera and in what regards sacred music on an area Versailles-Roma-Venice. >
Welcome to the list, Jean. You should find some interesting information within. I would not have guessed that Bordeaux musical life was so focused on Italian opera, but what do I know!

Did you mean to write mélomaniac? I couldn't find a definition for it, although mégalomaniac is. But mélomaniac is a very good word. It ought to be in the dictionary. You can just sense the meaning.

BTW There is another Jean on the list - Jean Laaninen, an American lady.

Alain Bruguieres wrote (August 25, 2007):
[To Jean Terrayre] Hello Jean!

Welcome on the list!

Now I'll feel less lonely, as these days I seem to be the only french member, unless there are others on lurking mode [list jargon meaning: reading the posts but refraining from posting]. There was a french contributor named Xavier a few months ago, he wrote remarkable comments on several cantatas but unfortunately he's left. Perhaps he'll show up again... I hope so!

In any case I look forward to reading often from you!

You may be interested to know that we've had discussions on the list as to what the official language is. Ed Minkowski claims that it is ACE. I entirely agree with him so far.

Then he makes so bold as to affirm that ACE means 'American Colloquial English'.

Of course as we all know, ACE means 'Approximative Continental English'. I personally make a point to write all my postings in strict adherence to this Standard. I trust you will follow me in this endeavour!

Alain (from Montpellier).

William Rowland (Ludwig) wrote (August 25, 2007):
[To Russell Telfer] Quand vous avez d'abord dit Jean j'ai cru que vous parliez de l'Américain Jean. J'étais sur le point de vous dire en privé qu'elle avait été sur la liste pour autrefois. Mais Bienvienu à la liste Jean.

When you first said Jean I thought that you were speaking of the American Jean. I was about to tell you privately that she had been on the list for sometime.

Stephen Benson wrote (August 26, 2007):
Jean Terrayre wrote:
< Thousand different gods and still the same. Arachnean madrigal (Junghänel) or bulky oratorio (G. Ramin) "tout est grâce". >
What an all-encompassing, beautifully expressed sentiment!
Someone who CAN see the forest for the trees!

Jean Laaninen wrote (August 26, 2007):
[To Jean Terrayre] Welcome Jean!

I am the other Jean, though our names are pronounced a bit differently as in the US my name rhymes with the word keen. There is also a man named Cara, and a woman named Cara. Cara T. is the lady, and Cara P. is the man.

I am sure you will enjoy being part of this forum. Even with some differences of opinion that make discussion interesting, we all love the cantatas deeply. You are in the right company here. Again,welcome.

Cara Emily Thornton wrote (August 26, 2007):
[To Jean Laaninen] :O:O:O:O:O:O:O:O To the best of my knowledge - and we have met in person - Cara P and I are both female!

Thérèse Hanquet wrote (August 26, 2007):
[To Jean Terrayre] Welcome - nice to see another native French speaker on this group!

To Alain: if it may make you feel less lonely, this is my case too, although I am not French... I also particularly love the last sentence with "tout est grâce".

Jean Laaninen wrote (August 26, 2007):
[To Cara Emily Thornton] I got that one wrong then. I thought I had a letter from Cara P. that said something about a wife. Well, from now on I will refrain from such statements.

Ed Myskowski wrote (August 27, 2007):
Alain Bruguières wrote:
< Hello Jean!
Welcome on the list! >
Yes, welcome!

< You may be interested to know that we've had discussions on the list as to what the official language is. >
I believe it is clearly stated that the official language is 'American English'. Not that most USA residents speak (or write) it very well, but that is another issue.

< Ed Minkowski claims that it is ACE. I entirely agree with him so far.
Then he makes so bold as to affirm that ACE means 'American Colloquial English'. >
Alors, mon ami, I have used ACE to indicate 'American Colloquial Expression', specifically to highlight a phrase which might be misunderstood, or not recognized, by someone reading along in 'Approximate Continental English'.

< Of course as we all know, ACE means 'Approximative Continental English'. I personally make a point to write all my postings in strict adherence to this Standard. I trust you will follow me in this endeavour! >
Just remember that 'stoop' is the front of the house, where you 'hang out' (ACE) to have a beer in the middle of August, 'stoup' is the holy water font at the front of the church, and 'soup' is the stew you cook up from the available resources, including amphibian of your choice.

'Stoup' and 'stoop' appear to have the same origin, which diverged, perhaps about 1066 AD. So I guess we are all in the soup together.

 

Introducing Myself

Nick Duplessis wrote (August 27, 2007):
Hello. My name is Nick and I've been reading this for a week or so. A little about my musical background: Something of a late bloomer in terms of playing, I took piano lessons in college and taught myself to play drums. Later I sought lessons in the drums and pursued that seriously for about ten years, when I put them aside to concentrate fully on voice, specifically classically-trained voice. As you might guess, my listening habits changed over time. I became more religious, and I developed a sincere interest in choral and solo literature, mostly sacred. I began singing in church and symphonic choirs, and to this day I'm an active church chorister and lyric baritone soloist. Since my dad is a talented amateur pianist and fan of all things Bach, my mom is a soprano (retired) and my stepfather directed church choirs, I guess I came by it honestly.

I own a good number of cantatas on CD. Among my current "heavy rotation" favorites are BWV 140, BWV 199, and BWV 82. I'm quite taken with the Hunt-Lieberson recording of BWV 82 and BWV 199.

As a performer I wish I could say that I have performed more Bach, but the amount of "unadorned" choral works that a part-time, unauditioned amateur choir can perform with confidence is rather small - from picking at my Riemenschneider edition of chorales it's clear that even the hymn settings are difficult. I am lucky in that the accompanist situation at my church is good, so I plan to perform some Bach solos in the future.

When I'm not listening to Bach cantatas I mix it up by listening to Bach keyboard works (Biggs and Gould, etc), listening to jazz, goofing around with my kids and goofing off on the internet.

Best, and looking forward to learning more about this seemingly inexhaustible treasure trove of music,

Russell Telfer wrote (August 27, 2007):
[To Nick Duplessis] Welcome to the list. It's a very active forum, month on month, and you can raise points as well as comment on them. You chose three beauties in BWV 82, BWV 82 and BWV 199.

One superb feature of the list is the wealth of information available on the website and through the website. Did you know you can listen to any of the sacred cantatas 'on tap'? The Leusink cantatas can be heard whenever you
like if you've got the right (free) software and ideally a broadband connection.

 

Bach In A Minute

Tom Sherwood wrote (September 5, 2007):
My name is Tom Sherwood. I a singer and conductor in Cincinnati, Ohio and have been a member of Cantata Group for several months. It has been very satisfying to read your posts and to listen to the cantatas. I have founded a group in Cincinnati called Bach Association of Cincinnati, Ohio. We are new and growing. I am interested in placing 90 second informational announcements on our local classical music station, WGUC FM, and am seriously under-qualified to write such info-nouncements. I wonder if any of you would be interested in writing such "spots" for me to record. They would be titled "Bach In A Minute" and accompanied by musical fragments appropriate to the announcement.
<>

 

Helmut Krebs is dead

Tom Brannigan wrote (September 12, 2007):
Aryeh Oron wrote:
< ........Unfortunately, only his recordings with Fritz Werner are currently available. .... >
Ah.......that's assuming you live entirely in a digital world......those shiny silver bier coasters.....ur, I mean CDs. I certainly do have several hundred of them out of desperation. I either can't find the composition on vinyl or it's just a bit too expensive at the moment. Have you ever attempted to track down Concerto Grosso No.1 by Alfred Schnittke on Melodiya vinyl.

Anyway, I checked out my 5,000 records to see if I had any recordings featuring Helmut Krebs that were NOT on a Fritz Werner recording. I came up with a couple.......there could easily be more.....I need to organize my library desperately!

Stravinsky's 1949 mono recording of Oedipus Rex/ Columbia ML 4644/ Krebs sings the role of the Shepherd.

J S Bach's St Matthew Passion (BWV 244) / also 1949/ Conducted by Fritz Lehmann/ French VOX DL 6070/ Krebs sings the role of the Evangelist.

I found these thanks to your Web Site's fact sheet on Krebs. What caught my eye was Stravinsky's favorite tenor being Richard Lewis. According to the article, Lewis took over the Oedipus role from Krebbs, but on the 1949 recording peter Pears sings that role...........No Richard on that one.........must be the 1959 stereo version.

The article also mentioned Krebs sang tenor in Bartok's Profana Cantata.....................checked my copy on Bartok records and guess what............the tenor is Richard Lewis!

Brad did say we could introduce ourselves to the group ONCE.

I love the artistry of Glenn Gould. I'm perfectly content with Gould not warming up to the music of Mozart, Schubert, Chopin, Liszt, and Bach's Chromatic Fantasy (BWV 903) ..........I have the damning video! For balance, I also listen to a very great deal to Edwin Fischer, early EMI Rosalyn Tureck, Sviatoslav Richter, Jörg Demus, Wilhelm Kempff, and Wilhelm Backhaus........................all vinyl.

Yes..........I much prefer piano to harpsichord, but I must have 25 or 30 harpsichorsolo issues. I'm somewhat of a hold-over from the late Romantic age.....Anton Rubinstein...Joseph Hoffmann..etc. That's why I love Fischer's Bach..............certainly not a HIP kinda guy.

Just finished listening to Otto Klemperer conducting the Budapest Orchestra in Bach's Brandenberg Concerto No.5 with Annie Fischer on piano. Tonight will be a treat...........Klemperer's 1954 EMI recordings of the Orchestral suites on the orignal UK pressings...........Glory be to God! Testament has some live recording of these, but the powers to be at EMI have never released the 54 studio recordings on CD....shame.

I probably won't post very often, but I'm very impressed with the member's expertise on subjects I haven't dreamed of exploring. LOL............I've dedicated 6 months to the music of Arnold Schoenberg. I'm already composing simple little diitys in 12 tone.............I'm hooked.

Have a great Evening and I hope to get to know you all in time. Any questions about vinyl...just ask. WARNING: I only have about 28 cantatas on vinyl.......................150 on those shiny silver things.

My claim to fame is that I own and original Mengelberg 1939 St Matt's Passion (BWV 244) on 1952 Philips "Microgroove" vinyl. It was a gift.

I just orderd 6 of Suzuki's Cantatas SACDs from Qualiton......still waiting.

Regard's, Tom B. My Little System... http://cgi.audioasylum.com/systems/134.html

 

Introducing myself

Gene wrote (September 15, 2007):
My name is Gene. I work as a high level technician. My background is in Mathematics. I will be attending Graduate School within a year or so.

I am also an amateur musician. I've been playing piano for about two years. I just started into the WTC I last week. Starting in my forties has been difficult but definitely worth it. To hear Bach is one thing, but to play his music is at times an astonishing experience.

Bach is also challenging to play. Even his simplest pieces have a certain degree of challenge though I imagine that I am half listening to them as I play, too.

 

Introduction of myself to the list

Terejia wrote (November 15, 2007):
I've just joined the list . Thank you for admitting into this list.

I'm a Japanese solicitor(judicial scribener is another translation of my profession), legal teacher(green new in the legal field. Just passed the legal state exam last year) and Catholic church organist. I play Bach pieces in Catholic mass.

Years ago, I used to participate in choir and participated in singing Matthews Passion (BWV 244), Johannes Passiln (BWV 245), H-moll mass (BWV 232) and some pieces of cantatas. Unlike others in the list, I'm not really a specialist in this field. I barely know around 30 pieces or so in regards with cantatas and I haven't compared 5 or 6 listenings of one piece so far, though I would love to do so as much as I can afford.

I would like to learn about scores and interpretations of Bach cantatas. For me, they are expressions of logical and mathematical orderliness which feels something common with legal subjects. As legal subjects deal with discordance and ugliness mostly, as an organist and ardent Bach lover, I'd like to learn about harmony and beauty of Bach music here, to balance myself. I'm glad I can read many inspiring messages about Bach cantatas here. Thank you for all the posters.

Lastly, as my native language is not English nor German, I'd like to appreciate you very much if you forgive me for not knowing proper English expression in a given context, from time to time.

Terejia (to use my Christian name here)

William Rowland (Ludwig) wrote (November 15, 2007):
[To Terejia]
ìTÎÇèêÎÊÎÓúÈÇëëËÎÈÕÕZòÔ
SÊìÐÊéÊBach
Ëcounterpoint
ÎÐÎÇìÇàÎÒÖÂëÃÆÎåÄÃëªèÓsevenths
.rÙÆÎîâTïÇëÆÐÐÎåĪèÓfouths
ÓëéìëÎèÊìéÏÉëÎ`ȪèÓßMÐÐÈßÊÆë

You will have to forgive my Japanese as it is worse than any of your English ever could be. Bach has much discord in it in the form of counterpoint but these are regarding as passing notes and therefore such progressions as fifths, seconds and sevenths are sometimes permitted the worst sin of all are parallel fifths and fouths.

Sie mssen meinem Japaner verzeihen, da es schlechter ist, als irgendwelche Ihres Englisch konnten berhaupt sein. Bach hat viel Zwietracht in ihm in Form von Kontrapunkt, aber diese betrachten als Fhren der Anmerkungen und folglich solcher Weiterentwicklungen, wie allen Fnfteln, Sekunden und sevenths manchmal die schlechteste Snde von sind parallele Fnftel und fouths die Erlaubnis gehabt werden

Chris Kern wrote (November 15, 2007):
Terejia wrote:
< Lastly, as my native language is not English nor German, I'd like to appreciate you very much if you forgive me for not knowing proper English expression in a given context, from time to time. >
BachCantatas&#12395;&#12424;&#12358;&#12371;&#12381;&#12290;&#65299;&#65296;&#20491;
&#12375;&#12363;&#30693;&#12425;&#12394;&#12356;&#12392;&#35328;&#12356;&#12414;&#12375;
&#12383;&#12364;&#12289;&#31169;&#12399;&#12371;&#12398;&#12522;&#12473;
&#12488;&#12395;&#21442;&#21152;&#12375;&#12383;&#26178;&#12289;&#12459;&#12531;&#12479;
&#12540;&#12479;&#12434;&#19968;&#12388;&#12418;&#32862;&#12356;&#12383;&#12371;&#12392
&#12364;&#12394;&#12363;&#12387;&#12383;&#12435;&#12391;&#12377;&#12424;&#12290;&#12371;
&#12398;&#20108;
&#24180;&#38291;&#12395;&#12377;&#12372;&#12367;&#21193;&#24375;&#12395;&#12394;&#12426;
&#12414;&#12375;&#12383;&#12290;&#12459;&#12531;&#12479;&#12540;&#12479;&#12434;&#27468;
&#12387;&#12383;&#12371;&#12392;&#12364;&#12354;&#12427;&#20154;&#12399;&#23569;&#12394;
&#12356;&#12363;
&#12425;&#12289;&#12486;&#12524;&#12472;&#12450;&#12373;&#12435;&#12398;&#32076;&#39443;
&#12399;&#30342;&#32862;&#12365;&#12383;&#12356;&#65288;&#35501;&#12415;&#12383;&#12356;
&#65311;ww)&#12392;&#24605;&#12356;&#12414;&#12377;&#12290;

And you don't have to worry about your English; your post was fine.

Chris Kern wrote (November 15, 2007):
The list doesn't seem to like Japanese very much; apologies for that mess.

&#12393;&#12358;&#12418;&#12377;&#12415;&#12414;&#12379;&#12435;&#12391;&#12375;&#12383;&#12290;

Anne (Nessie) Russell wrote (November 15, 2007):
[To Terejia] Welcome to the list Terejia,

I used to be a pianist at a Catholic church. An organ was not available. I'm looking forward to your input.

Terejia wrote (November 15, 2007):
I'd like to express my gratitude for all the warm and coardial welcome messages to me.

Thank you for trying to give me a message in Japanese. I appreciate your effort. I'm very glad to be here.

 

Introducing myself

Mariano Jimenez wrote (November 15, 2007):
Hello from Spain,

Thank you for admitting into this list. I'm a 37 years old musician. Sorry, my english is not good but Im very interested on this comunity. Since I was a child, Bachs music is present in my life. As a teacher and musician Ive worked on articles, conferences and courses about Bach in my country and yet I do. Im very interested in everything concerning the Cantatas and Im sure that I will learn a lot here.

Jean Laaninen wrote (November 15, 2007):
[To Mariano Jimenez] Welcome to the forum, Mariano. There is much to enjoy here, and it is good to have new members from everywhere.

 

Introducing Myself, and More on Bach's Singers

David Richie wrote (November 17, 2007):
Should have introduced myself before posting my question about Bach's singers.

I am 57, a former tenor, presently a lawyer, and church baritone. Did much oratorio work in my "Ute," in addition to a lot of professional opera chorus and some comprimario work.

I found Bach's tenor parts (solo and chorus) almost impossibly high. (I think the first chorus alone of BWV 80 has 14 high A's, for example.) I would have loved to sing Bach at original pitch but that wasn'possible in Washington DC in the 1970s.

Any thoughts on vocal techniques of tenors (specifically) in Bach's day? Did they sing with what we now call a mixed voice at the top, as do many of today's oratorio tenors?

Given the smaller total population of Germany in Bach's day, there must have been proportionately fewer people born with quality voices. Perhaps in Bach's day ALL the kids born with good voices were discovered singing in church, and funneled into the choir, whereas maybe today, most of them play ice hockey and never realize the true calling.

Continue of this discussion, see: Singers in Bach's Vocal Works [General Topics]

 

'Introducing Myself'

Steve Morrison wrote (November 23, 2007):
'Introducing Myself'
I am an illustrator from Virginia, and an amateur violinist. I have loved Bach's music for a long time, and have been learning to play some of the Cello Suites (arranged for violin). I have been listening to the cantatas over the last few months, and have found the discussions in this group extremely useful, so I decided to join in. Discovering this music and exploring it (the cantatas truly are endless!) has been a profound joy. Thanks to everyone for this wonderful community and the quality of discussion that takes place here--this is really a remarkable happening. I hope I can find a way to contribute.

Jean Laaninen wrote (November 23, 2007):
[To Steve Morrison] Welcome to the group Steve. I am sure you will be able to contribute something. I learn something new almost every week, and sometimes more than one new thing, but I also raise questions for the experts in the group, and now and then I make an observation that seems useful. You will enjoy the experience for sure.

 

Members of BCML, BRML & BMML: Year 1999 | Year 2000 | Year 2001 | Year 2002 | Year 2003 | Year 2004 | Year 2005 | Year 2006 | Year 2007 | Year 2008 | Year 2009 | Year 2010 | My First Cantata
BCML:
Year 2003 | Year 2004 | Year 2005 | Year 2006 | Year 2007 | Year 2008 | Year 2009
Profiles of Members & Contributors:
Page 1 | Page 2 | Page 3 | Page 4 | Links to Sites of Members | Guidelines for Discussions

Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
Chorale Texts | Chorale Melodies | Lutheran Church Year | Readings | Poets & Composers | Arrangements & Transcriptions
Search Website | Search Works/Movements | Terms & Abbreviations | Copyright | How to contribute | Sitemap | Links



 

Back to the Top


Last update: March 13, 2010 10:24:32