Recordings/Discussions
Background Information
Performer Bios

Poet/Composer Bios

Additional Information

Bach on Radio
Discussions

BBC Radio3 listeners: Bach's vocal writing

Peter Bright & Jill Gunsell wrote (December 8, 2000):
List members might be interested in a programme on BBC Radio 3 at 16:45 on Sunday, examining Bach's vocal writing, including OVPP notions. It should be available on the web via the BBC homepage: http://www.bbc.co.uk.

Bach Year

Sun, 10 Dec, BBC Radio 3, 1645-1745
Bach and the Voice: Ivan Hewett investigates Bach's vocal writing and addresses complaints by singers that he expects performers to negotiate difficult intervals and unreasonably long musical lines. He also explores different theories about the most suitable size of choirs for Bach's music, including the notion that his cantatas and passions were written to be sung by one person to each part.

 

On line Bach

Pieter Pannevis wrote (November 4, 2003):
Just in case a few of you might not be aware of a 24 hour online Internet radio, with cantatas and other works of Bach ( specially Glenn Gould) I would suggest you try to love nip your working moments on the pc by the following link: http://www.platforma.pl/bach/eng/kantaty.phtml

You might need real player, but that will follow in the course of the process

Iím not aware how the connection would be on a telephone line. Butís well worth a try.

 

Keys to Music program on Bach cantatas

David McKay wrote (December 15, 2009):
Beginners like me may appreciate this introduction to Bach's cantatas.
See http://www.abc.net.au/classic/keys/audio/keys_12122009.asx
It will only be online for a short while.

It is presented by Graham Abbott, Australian conductor and music presenter.

Neil Halliday wrote (December 15, 2009):
Thanks to the previous two posters for all this wonderful music.

Glen Armstrong wrote (December 15, 2009):
[To David McKay] David, thanks a lot for the direction to the Aussi program on cantatas! I have it on right now. Do you know whose version Mr Abbott used? I've e-mailed to enquire, but the chances of a reply are slim.

David McKay wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To Glen Armstrong] I'm not sure which recordings were used, but the information is usually given in the program.

Glen Armstrong wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To David McKay] Thanks, David. Yes, at the end of the program the host said all the excerpts were from Suzuki's set. He also told me how to pronounce MASAAKI, for which I am also grateful. Snowing, here...

Glen Armstrong wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To David McKay] Thanks, David. Yes, the announcer said, at the program's end, that all excerpts were from Suzuki's wonderful series. He also pronounced MASAAKI, with which I've been struggling for years!
It's snowing here on the Island...

Ed Myskowski wrote (December 16, 2009):
Glen Armstrong wrote:
< Thanks, David. Yes, the announcer said, at the program's end, that all excerpts were from Suzuki's wonderful series. He also pronounced MASAAKI, with which I've been struggling for years! It's snowing here on the Island... Glen Armstrong, P.E.I. >
Naturally, I am very fond of Prince Edward Island, if only for the common namesake.

Fear not the snow, global warming is progressing apace. Sea level rise is more the issue for islanders.

The Suzuki recordings are always a joy to listen to. I made a decision not to try to collect them complete, as issued, for reasons of economy and lack of a proper librarian. I do enjoy the fact that Suzuki intentionally adds to the possible variations in interpretation of scores, etc. The resonant acoustic grows on one, and is distinct from both Gardiner and Kuijken, the other ongoing releases. What a bounty!

I presume Masa-Aki is the pronounciation?

Glen Armstrong wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To Ed Myskowski] Yes, you have the pronunciation right. I presume if the Brits hadn't thrown out the French, who called this place, Ile Saint Jean, your fondness would be groundless... I wish I had your perceptiveness of the different acoustics. Must try to listen with that in mind.

Neil Mason wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To Glen Armstrong] Or you'll find it on the website: www.abc.net.au/classic/keys.

Guido de Winne wrote (December 16, 2009):
[To Neil Halliday] I love also Brahms very much. Good 2010.

 

WETA-FM: playing most of the Gardiner Bach Pilgrimage on-air this month

Bradley Lehman wrote (March 4, 2011):
According to WETA's web site, they are playing all 208 cantatas on the air this month, mostly from Gardiner's pilgrimage. Details: http://www.weta.org/fm/features/month

Several of their page links there are back to bach-cantatas.com

 

Bach on Radio

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 12, 2011):
I believe tonights concert by Red Priest: Vivaldi, Bach and other transcriptions, will be webcast at: www.99.5allclassical.org
as well as regular old FM radio (99,5) in the Boston USA area.

7:30 PM EDT ((11:30 UT).

Evan Cortens wrote (July 12, 2011):
[To Ed Myskowski] That link didn't work for me, but this one did: http://www.wgbh.org/995/

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 12, 2011):
[To Evan Cortens] Apologies for the last minute notice, I am happy that Evan got to join in.

I will try to work out the proper links. Brian McCreath (BCML correspondent) hosted on radio, I believe. Although we were both at the concert, I have yet to meet Brian *in the flesh*.

Red Priest are great entertainers. Would Bach have loved them? Are they helping to keep his music alive?

A sample of the entertainment, not specific to Bach (and abridged):

Handel was a great accompaniest, as well as a decent business man. But he occasionally overwhelmed his singers with his virtuousity. One of them, a portly tenor named Gordon, took offense.

Gordon: If you play that again, Mr. Handel, I will jump into your harpsichord!

Handel: If so, I will sell tickets. These people will pay more to see you try to jump, than to hear you sing.

Origin of the film title <White Men Cant Jump>?

Julian Mincham wrote (July 13, 2011):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< Red Priest are great entertainers. Would Bach have loved them? Are they helping to keep his music alive? >
I have seen them live several times in the UK. They comprise four virtuosos musicians (recorder, cello, violin and harpsichord) and the leader, Piers Adams is, I would think, the leading recorder player in the world today (I think he started his professional life as an astro physicist!). They play everything from memory and move about the stage whilst playing (yes, even the cellist!) so their performance is as much visual as aural so radio is not their natural medium. Purists are likely to find fault in some of their interpretations but the virtuosity of the performances is breath taking---through any medium. Their aim, I believe, is to get rid of the stuffiness traditionally associated with classical concert performance and make this music fun both to watch and to listen to. For myself I don't argue with that!

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 13, 2011):
Julian Mincham wrote:
EM (re Red Priest, Bach on Radio)
< Are they helping to keep his music alive? >
JM:
< I have seen them live several times in the UK. They comprise four virtuosos musicians >(recorder, cello, violin and harpsichord) and the leader, Piers Adams is, I would think, the >leading recorder player in the world today >
EM:
Very impressive, both for technique, and the range of instruments played. I believe he had about ten with him, although there may have a been a few left untouched.

JM:
< They play everything from memory and move about the stage whilst playing (yes, even the >cellist!) so their performance is as much visual as aural so radio is not their natural medium. >
EM:
I thought about very point, at the concert, especially since the venue at Rockport (new, in its second season) is stunning both visually and acoustically, and Red Priest appeared to enjoy both aspects to the maximum. In this performance, the cellist moving about was saved until near the end, quite a well-received surprise! I wonder if there is any historic support for Baroque performance practice, playing a cello-sized instrument with neck strap to elevate it?

JM:
< Purists are likely to find fault in some of their interpretations but the virtuosity of the >performances is breath taking---through any medium. Their aim, I believe, is to get rid of the >stuffiness traditionally associated with classical concert performance and make this music fun >both to watch and to listen to. For myself I don't argue with that! >
EM:
Yes, there were hearsay reports of a bit of grumbling from purists. Nonetheless, Julian is spot on for this performance: fun to watch and to hear. The impeccable, virtuosic performance should help to pacify critics. I expect a good part of the fun came across over the radio.

This concert was headlined as <Bach and the Pirates>, connecting Bach with the recent flurry of pirate films, but also pointing out that *piracy* was common among Baroque composers. Does that connection help to keep Bachs music alive?

Perhaps not by itself, but given the quality of performance (which covers a multitude of sins, to my ears) the connection from Baroque to present is outstanding.

Would Bach approve? Of course not! Bach grumbled about everything, no?

Bach works on the program, all transcribed from original instrumentation:

Preludio from Partita BWV 1006 (concert opening)

combined as a single work:
Arioso (from Harpsichord Concert Fm, BWV 1056)
Badinerie (from Orchestral Suite No. 2 Bm, BWV 1067)

Bach on G, first movement of a complex suite entitled:
<We Wont Let Her Go Till You Give Us Back Our Boat>

Toccata and Fugue Dm, BWV 565 (concert conclusion)

This concert is in conjunction with a current Red Priest CD release. Would Bach approve of the marketing effort? You betcha.

Bradley Lehman wrote (July 19, 2011):
Bach on strap-on cello [was: Bach on Radio]

Ed Myskowski wrote:
< In this performance, the cellist moving about was saved until near the end, quite a well-received surprise! I wonder if there is any historic support for Baroque performance practice, playing a cello-sized instrument with neck strap to elevate it? >
In volume 1 of Sigiswald Kuijken's new series of Bach cantatas (BWV 98, BWV 180, BWV 56, BWV 55), released 2006, there is a separate booklet with some points about the series as a whole, and about the instrumentation and vocal deployments. Kuijken has three pages in there about his use of the strap-on cello (Violoncello da Spalla alla moderna).

He has also recorded the solo cello suites that way a few years ago I've heard the recording, but haven't seen that booklet.

See it in action here, and at some other YouTube videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=081JUQ7f6Yo

Douglas Cowling wrote (July 19, 2011):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
< Kuijken has three pages in there about his use of the strap-on cello (Violoncello da Spalla alla moderna) >.
I think this was an episode of "Sex and the City"

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 21, 2011):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
< In volume 1 of Sigiswald Kuijken's new series of Bach cantatas (BWV 98, BWV 180, BWV 56, BWV 55), released 2006, there is a separate booklet with some points about the series as a whole, and about the instrumentation and vocal deployments. Kuijken has three pages in there about his use of the strap-on cello (Violoncello da Spalla alla moderna). >
Thanks for the reminder, and for video link. The cello used by Red Priest is larger, and played more upright, but perhaps historically accurate nonetheless.

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 21, 2011):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
<< Kuijken has three pages in there about his use of the strap-on cello (Violoncello da Spalla alla moderna). >>
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< I think this was an episode of "Sex and the City". >
EM:
Perhaps it was the *alla moderna* which seemed relevant? No, there was young Bach, caught in the choir loft, strap-on or not.

Which opens up all sorts of possibilities for TV sequels.

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 24, 2011):
Bach on radio/web

In a few minutes (5:00 PM EDT, 2100 UT) the Bach Hour will be broadcast on 99.5 FM in the Boston USA area, and webcast at

http//www.99.5allclassical.org

Recently, Evan Cortens found that link to be incorrect, but did find access via www.wgbh.org

I did not yet take the time to check out this detail, as I listen via FM.

Todays topic includes BWV 93, which we discussed recently, and it includes specific reference to other uses of the related chorale. Very timely to our discussions. Since host Brian McCreath is a BCML reader, proabably not a coincidence.

I believe the webcast remains avaliable for the coming week.

Evan Cortens wrote (July 24, 2011):
[To Ed Myskowski] Yes, I regret the first address Ed gives does not work for me, but http://www.wgbh.org/995/ does.

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 24, 2011):
[To Evan Cortens] Thanks for the timely help, Evan! Perhaps the decimal is incorrect, I will make it a point (not decimal!) to check: http://www.995allclassical.org

That is the web address given over the FM airwaves.

Evan Cortens wrote (July 24, 2011):
[To Ed Myskowski] Ah yes, that works, though it redirects to the address I gave before. Thanks!

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 25, 2011):
Evan Cortens wrote:
< Ah yes, that works, though it redirects to the address I gave before. Thanks! >
The confusion is likely the result of WGBH taking over a previous classical music station, with FM frequency 99.5 FM. They announce the FM frequency as 99 point 5. The *point* is omitted in the web access announcement. Apparently that punctuation is critical. Shades of the Terry Southern film, Brazil.

I think there is room for improvement here, but I am reluctant to complain, because the music is so good, especially the continuation of the Boston Bach on Radio tradition, coming up on 40 years.

Next week, we will be discussing BWV 9 on and for the Sixth Sunday aftet Trinity, which will be the featured work on the WGBH Bach Hour, as well, on the actual Sixth Sunday after Trinity, if all my calculations are correct. Rather like an astronomical (not to say logical) Jupiter/Saturn conjunction, which occurs once every twenty years.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (July 25, 2011):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< Next week, we will be discussing BWV 9 on and for the Sixth Sunday aftet Trinity, which will be the featured work on the WGBH Bach Hour, as well, on the actual Sixth Sunday after Trinity, if all my calculations are correct. Rather like an astronomical (not to say logical) Jupiter/Saturn conjunction, which occurs once every twenty years. >
What an odd (but wonderful) coincidence. I'm editing Graupner's cantata "Schweig Selle schweige aller Freduden," GWV 1119:27 which sets the chorale "Es ist das Heil uns kommen her" for the last movement.

What prompted my interest was the luscious opening movement with 2 traverse flutes and all the pizzicato strings. Such a lovely pastoral movement.

Douglas Cowling wrote (July 25, 2011):
Graupner Goodies

Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< cantata "Schweig Selle schweige aller Freduden," GWV 1119:27 which sets the chorale "Es ist das Heil uns kommen her" for the last movement. >
What prompted my interest was the luscious opening movement with 2 traverse flutes and all the pizzicato strings. Such a lovely pastoral movement. >
Send us a couple pages as appetizers!

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 25, 2011):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] From Doug Cowling post (re Trinity 6):

2) HYMN OF DAY (de tempore)
"Eist das Heil uns kommen her" http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale020-Eng3.htm
Sample: Amazon.com

 

OT: DeKoven Presents and his "Barococo Society" Broadcasts

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (September 11, 2013):
Many years ago, several classical radio stations in the United States carried a syndicated program entitled "DeKoven Presents!" Seymour DeKoven was a New York City art critic who was a self taught musician and started a radio broadcast in the 1950s through the 1970s (he died in 1984). He was remarkable in many ways, mostly because in the period he grew up in, there wasn't that much baroque music recorded, and most recitals and concerts didn't include it (maybe some Bach). He was providing a tremendous service to listeners who wanted to learn more about the music (i.e. me!)

I was fortunate that WGH-FM (a commercial classical radio station) and then WHRO/WHRV broadcasted DeKoven presents.

Dekoven's passion in baroque music was always a joy to hear. He was ALWAYS an advocate for the record buying public, always taking record labels to task for being cheap and short changing their customers with albums that had less than 20 minutes of music, no timings for movements, and grievous spelling errors and lack of identification of music, etc. Many times he would identify the albums so listeners could buy them for their enjoyment. While he pulled no punches, Dekoven was always appreciative of his fans and would take time to personally write anyone who sent him correspondence. His acronyms for music he loved would include "OTW" (Out of this world) and the most rarefied "OTU" (Out of this universe!).

I have several of the broadcasts and finally uploaded a few of them to Youtube.

This broadcast feature the following music: a formerly attributed Bach cantata by Telemann for Easter Sunday, also music by Lully, Gottfried Heinrich Stoelzel, another Telemann piece, Renaissance music by Moderne, and a Mozart symphony. You get a sense of the programing style just from that playlist. DeKoven was an avid supporter of Stephen Foster music as well, calling him the American Schubert.

The video is available on Youtube @: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yUB2uy42ms&feature=youtu.be

William Hoffman wrote (September 12, 2013):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Thank you. The opening theme music is Handel's Dettingen Te Deum, a much-neglected work. DeKoven on Cantata 160 seems a bit strident but right on about apocryphal Bach works. The situation has improved but we still have much to learn.

William Hoffman wrote (September 12, 2013):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] The opening theme is Handel's Dettingen Te Deum, a much neglected work. IMHO DeKoven's views on Bach apocryphal works years ago were strident but perceptive.

Bach studies have come a long way since then with a sense of generosity of spirit, but much remains in that open spirit.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (September 11, 2013):
[To William Hoffman] Yes. WHRO FM had a copy of that same record with the Handel ( I believe it was on Nonesuch) and one of the announcers wrote on it "DeKoven's theme music!"

William Hoffman wrote (September 12, 2013):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Nonesuch H 71003 had the German Baroque Soloists, I think. I have an earlier recording, McIntosh Music LP MC 1014, with the National Gallery Orchestra and the Chancel Choir of the National Presbyterian Church, Richard Bales conductor, c.1958. They played on Sunday evenings in Washington DC. Bales was the arranger of the Columbia recordings of the Union, Confederacy, Revolution and Republic. I sang the last with him here in Albuquerque on July 4, 1976. There also is a fine German language Harmonia Mundi edition of the Dettingen Te Deum with Wolfgang Goennenwein.

Eric Schissel wrote (September 19, 2013):
Belatedly about DeKoven

[To Kim Patrick Clow] Ah! Out of curiosity, was he a relative of the composer Reginald DeKoven (1859-1920)? Very sorry if that's already been mentioned...

Teri Noel Towe wrote (September 19, 2013):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote::
< He was remarkable in many ways, mostly because in the period he grew up in, there wasn't that much baroque music recorded, and most recitals and concerts didn't include it (maybe some Bach). He was providing a tremendous service to listeners who wanted to learn more about the music (i.e. me!) >
I may be 65, but I remember DeKoven's broadcasts in the late 1950s and 1960s vividly.

He was one of the two broadcasters who inspired me to go into radio. (The other was Bill Watson on WNCN.) I always shall be indebted to DeKoven. I do not hesitate to acknowledge the indebtedness, and I acknowledge it with admiration and gratitude.

He definitely was 'Super OTU'!

 

Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
Chorale Texts | Chorale Melodies | Lutheran Church Year | Readings | Poets & Composers | Arrangements & Transcriptions
Search Website | Search Works/Movements | Terms & Abbreviations | Copyright | How to contribute | Sitemap | Links



 

Back to the Top


Last update: żOctober 13, 2013 ż19:38:05