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Cantata BWV 129
Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott
Discussions - Part 3

Continue from Part 2

Discussions in the Week of April 10, 2011

Ed Myskowski wrote (April 10, 2011):
Introduction to BWV 129 -- Gelobet sei der Herr, mein Gott

This weeks discussion concludes the series of cantatas spanning from Easter to Ascension, Pentecost, and Trinity. With BWV 129, we have the last of four works for Trinity Sunday.

Details of text, commentary, recordings, and previous discussion are accessible via: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV129.htm

The link to commentary by Julian [Mincham] is especially recommended as an introduction to listening.

The BWV 129 page also has convenient access to Gardiners notes to the pilgrimage CDs, by clicking on the PDF link under the picture of the CD cover. Volume 27, including this weeks BWV 129, is appropriate for all four weeks with the cantatas for Trinity Sunday.

Our recent discussions have been helpful in clarifying the structure of the church calendar. I also find this site informative: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liturgical_calendar_(Lutheran)
especially the circular graph (pie chart) which shows the seasons of the church year: The different character of two parts (approximately halves) of the year is apparent, if not exactly a formal division bounded by Advent and Trinity.

Julian Mincham emphasized the individual character of the works for Trinity and the two following Sundays, from the second Leipzig cycle (BWV 176, BWV 20, and BWV 2). The same can be said for all four works for Trinity Sunday, including last weeks BWV 176 and this weeks BWV 129.

Ed Myskowski wrote (April 16, 2011):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< Julian Mincham emphasized the individual character of the works for Trinity and the two >following Sundays, from the second Leipzig cycle (BWV 176, BWV 20, and BWV 2). The same can be said for all four works for Trinity Sunday, including last weeks BWV 176 and this weeks BWV 129. >
I suggested last week that the brevity of BWV 176 could perhaps be Bachs humorous punctuation to two years of intensive composition, including the contractual constraint that the music not be too long. I did not give that a lot of thought, and I had not noticed that Gardiner speculates on something similar, re BWV 176/1:
<I wonder whether this arresting comment on the human condition reflected Bachs own views, particularly as regards the intractable attitude of the Leipzig Consistory.> (end quote)

Our (BCML) recent parallel discussion of the the two-part cantatas has brought up some related passing thoughts, not least of which is the humor of a contractual constraint on Bach to not make the music too long, in the context of a one hour sermon.

A bit more seriously, perhaps the festive BWV 129 of 1726 had been in mind all along? I believe the current thinking is that it was a replacement for BWV 176, in Bachs Jahrgang II compilation. Why not an addition, rather than replacement, completion of an idea? BWV 176 is cantata I, followed by sermon, hymn, preluding (improvised or other), leading directly to the *unprepared* entry of the chorus in BWV 176/1, cantata II.

Sorry for all those numbers, hope they are correct.

Ed Myskowski wrote (April 16, 2011):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< Why not an addition, rather than replacement, completion of an idea? BWV 176 is cantata I, followed by sermon, hymn, preluding (improvised or other), leading directly to the *unprepared* entry of the chorus in BWV 176/1, cantata II.
Sorry for all those numbers, hope they are correct. >
Not quite. That should be:

BWV 129 (not BWV 176) is cantata I, followed by sermon, hymn, preluding (improvised or other), leading directly to the *unprepared* entry of the chorus in BWV 176/1, cantata II.

 

Cantata BWV 129: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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Last update: ýSeptember 28, 2011 ý07:53:17