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Chorales in Bach's Vocal Works
Discussions - Part 8

Continue from Part 6

Chorales: Psalms, Christian Life, Troubles, Thanks, Weddings

William Hoffman wrote (July 28, 2017):
Bach’s well-regulated church music was grounded in the Lutheran chorale which Bach composed in virtually every form, from harmonized settings and melodies in the organ choral preludes to cantatas and oratorios, motets and even in intonations in concerted Latin settings. The template for this order in the church year was established in his Weimar Orgelbüchlein and expanded in his Das neu Leipiger Gesangbuch (NLGB) of 1682 as cantor and music director in Leipzig. Eventually, in the 1730s, Bach pursued individual sacred songs for inclusion in church services with the omnibus (954 hymns) Schemelli-Gesangbuch (Breitkopf 1736) which includes stanzas of established hymns, BWV 2530-438, as well as newer pietist settings, BWV 439-507 (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_songs_and_arias_by_Johann_Sebastian_Bach). The designated hymns for each service, as well as detailed information on the chorales Bach set, are found at the Bach Cantata Website (BCW), “Motets and Chorales for Events in the Lutheran ChurchYear,” http://www.bach-cantatas.com/LCY/M&C-Table.htm.

While working on pietist songs and Mass/Catechism chorale prelude settings, Bach updated the so-called “Great 18 Leipzig” chorales, composed in Weimar with revisions and additions in his final decade (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Eighteen_Chorale_Preludes). Twelve are Reformation hymns and most have omne tempore liturgical usages in the Deutsche Messe and as pulpit hymns or de tempore as Graduallieder for Pentecost, Trinity or Advent, as well as multiple usages.1

Two years before, while calling on his colleagues in 1523 to set paraphrases of penitential psalms like the de profundis (Psalm 130), Martin Luther also set other psalm hymns: “Ach Gott vom Himmel, sigh darein" (Psalm 12, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale026-Eng3.htm); “Ein' feste Burg ist unser Gott” (Psalm 46, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV80-Eng3.htm [1,2,4,8]); “Es woll' uns genädig sein” (Psalm 67, http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale108-Eng3.htm), “Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit” (Psalm 124, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wär_Gott_nicht_mit_uns_diese_Zeit), and “Wohl dem, der in Gotts Furcht steht” (Psalm 128, http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/martin-luther-kirchenlieder-268/34,
https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=de&u=http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/martin-luther-kirchenlieder-268/34&prev=search).

The Trinity Time (omne tempore) sacred songs that Bach set rarely cite the day’s Gospel/Epistle, instead reflecting on the life of the church through themes. The most prominent are “Christian Life and Conduct” and “Word of God and the Christian Church,” which biblically, include paraphrase settings of various psalms. After catechism-based chorales, the next section of the NLGB has the rubric “Christian Life and Conduct,” NLGB Nos. 234 to 274, beginning with generic chorales (NLGB Nos. 234-240, see below) and followed by psalm paraphrase settings of 27 various types of psalms: Nos. 1, 2, 6, 8, 12-14, 23, 31, 41, 46, 51, 67, 90, 91, 103, 117, 121, 124, 127, 128, 130, 138, 142, 143, 147, and 150. Then, there is the NLGB related rubric of “Cross, Persecution, and Tribulation,” setting Nos. 275-304, and “Word of God and Christian Church, NLGB Nos. 305-323. Meanwhile, Bach’s Orgelbüchlein (Ob.) incipit church year template has the general rubric of “Christian Life and Conduct,” Ob. listings Nos. 87-126, including seven Psalm Hymns (Ob. Nos. 114-119 on Psalms 12, 14, 46, 67, and 124), followed by the heading “Word of God & Christian Church,” Ob. Nos. 120-126. In addition to settings found in the NLGB and listed in the Orgelbüchlein are many other Bach plain chorale settings from hymnbooks published after 1730, as well as the some 84, melody-continuo settings of Bach found in the Schemelli songbook, most published as BWV 439-505 with 19 melodies attributed to Bach.2

Increasingly, Bach departed from his NLGB directory and pursued sacred sings from other hymnbooks, occasionally writing his own melodies to various published hymn texts.3 These are four melodies in the Clavierbüchlein for Anna Magdalena Bach, 1725-32 (BWV 452, 512, 514, 516); hymn “Drum schließ ich mich in deine Hände” (Therefore I put myself in your hands, Paul Thymich text), motet BWV 229, “Komm, Jesu, Komm,” before 1732; “Hilf, Herr Jesu, laß gelingen,” BWV 248/42 (1734-35) and BWV 344 (Johann Rist 1642 New Years text); 19 melodies with figured bass in Schemelli-Gesangbuch (1736; BWV 439-40, 443, 449, 453, 462, 466, 468-9, 471, 484, 487, 492, 498, 505); two recently discovered chorales, “Denket doch, ihr Menschenkinder,” BWV 1122, and “Welt, tobe, wie du willst,” BC F 198 (Zahn 2934); and four other melodies unknown except in Bach settings of pietist texts: BWV 357, “Jesu, Jesu, du bist meine” (anon. text 1687); BWV 384, “Nicht so traurig, nicht so sehr” (Paul Gerhardt 1647 text); BWV 400, “O Herzensangst, O Bangigkeit un Zagen” (D. Gerhardt Müller 1700 text); and BWV 423, “Was betrübst du dich, mein Herz” (Zacharias Hermann 1690 text).

Varied Psalm Settings

Beyond the chorale paraphrases of psalms of penitence and ritual observance appropriate for communion are a varied group of Reformation psalms hymns and later settings under the rubric “The Church Militant,” found in the NLGB mostly under “Christian Life and Conduct: Psalm hymns,” NLGB 241-274. Bach set them in five chorale Cantatas: BWV 2, “Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein” (NLGB 249, Psalm 12, Trinity 2); BWV 80, “Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott” (NLGB 266, Psalm 46, BWV 80a, Oculi 1715; Reformation); BWV 14, “War’ Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit” (NLGB 266, Psalm 124, Epiphany 4); BWV 178, “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält” (NLGB 267, Psalm 124, (Trinity 8); and Cantata 112, “Der Herr ist meine Getreue Hirt, hält mir” (Psalm 23, mel. “Allein Gott,” NLGB 252, Misericordias Domini). Bach also set 10 NLGB Psalm hymns as plain chorales: “Danket den Herren, denn er ist so freundlich” (NLGB 218 Catechism: Before Meal, Psalm 136), BWV 286; “Der Herr ist meine Getreue Hirt, dem ich” (NLGB No. 251, Psalm 23, mel.”Allein Gott”); BWV 83/3 cle. aria, BWV 104/6; “Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl” (Psalm 14, NLGB 250), BWV 308; “Es woll’ uns Gott gnädig sein” (NLGB 258, Psalm 67), BWV 311-12(PC); “Herr, straf mich nich in deinem Zorn” (NLGB No. 244, Psalm 6), BWV 338; “Gott sei uns gnädig und barmherzig” (NLGB No. 319, Word of God, Psalm 67), BWV 323; “Lobet den Herren, denn er ist so freundlich” (NLGB No. 223, Catechism: After Meal, Psalm 147), BWV 374; “Lobet Gott, unsern Herren” (NLGB No. 273, Psalm 147), melody “Befiehl du deine Wege,” BWV 272, BWV 1126; "Wo Gott zum Haus nicht gibt sein Gunst" (NLGB 268, Psalm 127), BWV 438, BWV 1123. One plain chorale setting is not found in the NLGB: Matthäus Appeles von Löwenstern’s 1644 “Wenn ich in Angst und Not” (Psalm 121, see Terry Ibid.: No. 367, 4 st. & trans.), BWV 427. In the NLGB as No. 271 Psalm hymn, Ob. 101 (Christian Life) is Wolfgang Dachstein’s 1525 Psalm 137 paraphrase, “An Wasserflussen Babylon,” BWV 653 (18), BWV 267.

“Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält” (If the Lord God does not stay with us) deserves special attention. It is a 1724 paraphrase of Psalm 124, Nisi quia D(If the Lord has not been on our side), of Justus Jonas, a Luther colleague. It is found in the NLGB as No. 267 (Christian Life & Conduct, Psalm setting). At the same time, Luther used the original German text source in the same Bar form (see Luther’s translation http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale086-Eng3.htm) to a different melody (Zahn 4434) for his Psalm 124 paraphrase, “Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit” (If God were not with us at this time), NLGB No. 266. The same Jonas melody (Zahn 4441a) is set to two different hymn texts: “Ach lieben Christen sei getrost” (Ah dear Christians, be comforted), David Spaiser /Johann Gigas 1521/61 hymn (NLGB 326, Death & Dying; CC BWV 114 (Tr.17), BWV 256(PC), and as “Herr, wie du willt, so schick's mit mir” (Lord, as you will, deal with me), Kaspar Bienemann’s 1582 Death and Dying hymn (NLGB No. 349), which Bach set as a choral chorus to open Cantata 73 for the 3rd Sunday after Epiphany 1724. Bach set the Luther Psalm 124 paraphrase, “Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit,” as chorale Cantata BWV 14, for the 4th Sunday after Epiphany in 1735 to fill a gap in the second cycle. Meanwhile, Bach set two stanzas of “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält” as plain chorales in his St. Mark Passion in 1731: BWV 247/3 is BWV 256 or 258, Stanza 7, “Sie stellen uns wie Ketzern nach” (They persecute us as heretics), and BWV 247/26 is BWV 257, Stanza 2, “Was Menschen Kraft und Witz anfäh” (What human power and intelligence contrive).

Bach also set the melody of “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält,” chorale prelude BWV 1128=Anh. II 71 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJrEvArDByg, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wo_Gott_der_Herr_nicht_bei_uns_hält,_BWV_1128), rediscovered in 2008. It is an early, unique extended work of growing growing confidence, “a composer finding his own original manner without idly adopting then usual formulae,” observes Peter Williams.4 “It’s rediscovery prompts many such new ideas about Bach’s development along with questions about unknown lost works.”

Here is Bach’s settings, beginning with the Orgelbüchlein (Ob.) numbers 101-119 (none set for this collection), followed by 10 hymns not listed in the Orgelbüchlein but in the NLGB or other hymnals:

In Time of trouble, a) The Church Militant (Psalm Hymns)

101. (Christian Life) “An Wasserflussen Babylon” (NLGB 271, Psalm 137); BWV 653(18), BWV 267.*
114. “Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein” (Psalm 12, Luther); CC BWV 2, BWV 741(MC);
115. “Es spricht der Unweisen Mund wohl” (Psalm 14); BWV 308;*
116. “Ein’ feste Burg ist unser Gott’ (NLGB No. 255, Christian Life, Psalm 46, Luther); CC BWV 80, BWV 720(MC); BWV 247/38=302-03(PC);*
117. “Es woll’ uns Gott gnädig sein” (Psalm 67); BWV 311-12(PC);*
118. “War’ Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit” (Psalm 124); CC BWV 14 (Ep.4);
119. “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält”; (Psalm 124, NLGB 267), CC BWV 178, BWV 257(PC)=?247/26, BWV 256 or 258(PC)=?247/3; BWV 1128=Anh. II 71(MC); melody in “Ach lieben Christen sei getrost” (NLGB 326, Death & Dying; CC BWV 114 (Tr.17), BWV 256(PC);*
-- “Danket den Herren, denn er ist so freundlich” (Psalm 136); BWV 286(PC);*
-- “Der Herr ist meine Getreue Hirt, dem ich” (Psalm 23, mel.”Allein Gott”); BWV 83/3 aria, BWV 104/6(PC);
-- “Der Herr ist meine Getreue Hirt, hält mir” (Psalm 23, mel. “Allein Gott” OB 53), CC BWV 112 (Es.1);
-- “Herr, straf mich nich in deinem Zorn” (Psalm 6), BWV 338(PC);*
-- “Gott sei uns gnädig und barmherzig” (Psalm 67), BWV 323(PC);*
-- “Laß, o Herr, der Ohr sich neigen” (Psalm 86), BWV 372(PC);*
-- “Lobet den Herren, denn er ist so freundlich” (Psalm 147), BWV 374(PC);*
-- “Lobet Gott, unsern Herren” (Psalm 147), melody “Befiehl du deine Wege,” BWV 272(PC); BWV 1126(PC)*
-- “Wenn ich in Angst und Not” (Psalm 121), BWV 427(PC);* and
-- "Wo Gott zum Haus nicht gibt sein Gunst" (Psalm 127); BWV 438(PC), BWV 1123(PC).*

All* but two of these chorale psalm hymns are found in the Helmut Rilling’s anthology recordings, Ein Choralebuch für Johann Sebastian (https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/bach-j.s.-book-chorale-settings/id346769401, Nos. 9-24). Recorded here and found elsewhere in Bach’s hymnbooks is the sacred song setting of Martin Opitz's 1637 Psalm 86 paraphrase, “Laß, o Herr, dein Ohr sich neigen” (Bow, thine ear, o Lord, unto me, music, text & trans. Terry, Ibid.: No. 232), to the Louis Bourgeois Psalm 86 melody, from Ambrosius Lobwasser’s Herr, dein Ohren zu mir beige (Zahn 6863) in Bourgeois’ 1547 Pseaulmes cinquante de David (BWV 372) and Opitz’s 1634 (Fischer-Tümpel I:297), set as “Herr, nicht schicke dein Reiche” (Lord, don't send your revenge, SG, BWV 463; http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/Chorale463-Eng3.htm). Löwenstern’s paraphrase of Psalm 150, “Singt dem Herrn ein neues Lied” (Sing to the Lord a new song), found in his Fruelings-Mayen (Bresslau 1644), was set by Bach as plain chorale BWV 411 (music, text & trans. Terry, Ibid.: No. 320).5

Christian Life & Conduct

The heart of the omne tempore thematic chorales on the life of the church spring from Jesus’ Christological teachings in the found in overlapping categories as outlined in Bach’s Orgelbüchlein (Nos. 87-113) as “Christian Life and Conduct,.” Many are hymns of “Thanks & Praise,” as well as interrelated hymns of Cross, Persecution & Tribulation (NLGB), also known as hymns In Time of Trouble. In the first category below, “Christian Life and Conduct,” Bach generally set plain chorales and sacred songs, including many not listed in the Orgelbüchlein or the NLGB but classified as “Thanks & Praise” or “Christian Life.” Bach composed only one of eight Orgelbüchlein listings of “Christian Life and Conduct,” No. 91, “Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ,” BWV 639. Of note are multiple settings of the popular hymns “Meinen Jesum laß ich nicht,” including chorale Cantata 124, and Rinckard’s “Nun danket alle Gott,” including chorale Cantata 192, this with “Von Gott will ich nicht lassen,” also set in the “Great Leipzig 18” organ chorale preludes. “Nun danket alle Gott” (not found in the Ob.) was sung in Leipzig at the conclusion of the Good Friday vespers Passion, an eschatological reference, says Leahy (Ibid.: 110). Increasingly, chorales with eschatological import for later Trinity Time Sundays appear in the hymnbooks later categories dealing with the topics of “Death & Dying,” “Evening” hymns, and “Last Days, Resurrection of the Dead, and Life Eternal.”

Christian Life and Conduct (Ob. 89-113, with subheadings), NLGB 234-40 and elsewhere

89. “Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh’ allzeit”; (NLGB 325, Death & Dying); PC BWV 111/6, 72/6, BWV 144/6, 244/31
90. “Kommt her zu mir, spricht Gottes Sohn”; (NLGB 234, Christian Life; BWV 74/8(PC); 108/6(PC);
91. BWV 639 — “Ich ruf zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ” (NLGB 235, Christian Life); CC BWV 177(Tr.4), BWV 1124(PC);
92. “Weltlich Ehr’ und zeitlich Gut” (NLGB 240, Christian Life); BWV 426(PC);*
93. “Von Gott will ich nicht lassen”*** (NLGB 310, Word of God), BWV 73/5 BWV 417-419, BWV 658 (18); other text settings: “Was willst du dich betrüben,” chorale Cantata 107 (Tr.7); and “Gott fähret auf gen Himmel,” BWV 11/9(PC);
94. “Wer Gott vertraut, hat wohl gebaut” (NLGB 276, Cross): BWV 433(PC);***
95. “Wie’s Gott gefalhrist zu seinlt, so gefällt mir’s auch” (NLGB 280 Cross); melody “Was mein Gott will”; See OB 89;
96. “O Gott du frommer Gott” (NLGB 202, Evening); BWV 399(PC), BWV 767(MC), BWV 1125(PC);* **
-- “Alles ist an Gottes segen,” BWV 263(PC);*
-- “Auf, auf, mein Herz, und mein ganzer Sinn,” BWV 268(PC);*
-- “Beglücket Stand getreuer Seelen,” BWV 442(SG);*
-- “Beschränkt, ihr,Weisen dieser Welt,” BWV 443(SG);*
-- “Das walt mein Gott”; BWV 291(PC);*
-- “Dich bet ich an, mein höchster Gott”; BWV 449(SG), BWV deest (Wiemer 6, PC);
-- “Du, o schönes Weltgebau,” BWV 301(PC);*
-- “Es kostet viel, ein Christ zu zein,” BWV 459(SG);
-- “Es glänzet ser Christen in wendiges Leben,” BWV 456(SG);*
-- “Meinen Jesum laß ich nicht,” (NLGB 346, Death & Dying, Zahn 3449); BWV 70/11, CC BWV 124 (Eph.1), BWV 154/8, BWV 157/5, 244a, BWV 379-380(PC)*;
-- “Nun danket alle Gott” (NLGB 238 Christian Life); CC BWV 192(Ref.), BWV 252 (wedding), BWV 386(PC), BWV 657(18);*
-- “O liebe Seele, zieh die Sinnen”; BWV 494(SG)*

There are two overarching themes in these chorales: Trust in God and “Thanks and Praise.” Hymns designated* are found in vol. 83, https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/bach-a-book-of-chorale-settings-for-morning-thanks-praise/id42055358, Rilling’s anthology recordings, Ein Choralebuch für Johann Sebastian. “Patience and Serenity” are found in vol. 84 (https://franklin.library.upenn.edu/catalog/FRANKLIN_9933875553503681)**. Chorales on “Trust in God, Cross and Consolation” are found in vol. 85, https://searchworks.stanford.edu/view/10141372***. The entire series is listed at http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV250-438-Rilling.htm. Rilling has a collection, “Cantatas: Praise & Thanks, Death & Eternity: BWV 21, 38, 51, 56, 76, 79, 80, 82, 93, 106, 137, 140, 149 https://www.discogs.com/Johann-Sebastian-Bach-Bach-Ensemble-Helmuth-Rilling-Cantatas-Praise-And-Thanks-Death-And-Eternity/release/5591921, and
Praise and Thanks Cantatas: BWV 10, 16, 17, 29, 33, 51, 69, 76, 79, 84, 117, 119, 120, 130, 137, 167, 192.
http://www.hmv.co.jp/en/artist_Bach-1685-1750_000000000002339/item_Praise-Thanks-Cantatas-Rilling-Stuttgart-Bach-Collegium-etc-6CD_3828062.

The Common Weal (Christian Life and Conduct)

Two wisdom psalm settings in Bach’s Orgelbüchlein, Nos. 127 and 128, used for Lutheran weddings, are designated under “Christian Life and Conduct: The Common Weal” and found in. the NLGB under “Christian Life and Conduct: Psalm hymns,” NLGB Nos. 269 and 268, respectively. The hymn “Wohl dem, der in Gottes Furcht steht” (Happy the man that fears God, Zahn 298?) is Luther’s 1525 setting of Psalm 128, Beati omnes6 (NLGB 269, Psalm Hymn; two melodies music, text & trans. http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/luther-the-hymns-of-martin-luther, xvii). There was no Bach setting of the Orgelbüchlein incipit, No. 87. “This (http://www.orgelbuechlein.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/Ob-87-Wohl-dem-der-in-Gottes-Furcht-steht-tune-Wohl-mag-der-sein.pdf) is the version in Weissenfels (1714), though the Sibley Choral-Buch presents an earlier melody (Zahn 298), by Walter (1524,” http://www.orgelbuechlein.co.uk/the-missing-chorales/). Although Luther rejected the Catholic designation of matrimony as a sacrament, he set German and Latin paraphrases of Psalm 127. They were found in hymnals appropriate for their reference to the 2nd Sunday after Epiphany Gospel, the Wedding feast at Cana (John 2:1-11). At the same time, the wedding text was set to four variant melodies, beginning with the Communion hymn, Jesus Christus, unser Heiland.”

A five-stanza English translation of “Wohl dem, der in Gottes Furcht steht” (http://www.lutheranchoralebook.com/texts/happy-the-man-who-feareth-god/) is set to the melody “Wo Gott zum Haus nicht giebt sein’ Gunst” (If God will not the building bless), a Johann Kolroß paraphrase of Psalm 127, Nisi Dominus http://matthaeusglyptes.blogspot.com/2015/08/wo-gott-zum-haus-nicht-gibt-sein-gunst.html. This became a popular wedding hymn. It is found in the NLGB 268, Zahn 305, which Bach set as plain chorales, BWV 438 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WhisdvHI-Eo), and BWV 1123 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUOcx76hJvI).

Meanwhile, Bach set various “Thanks and Praise” chorales for weddings, best known are four hymns and their pure-hymn chorale cantata settings: “Was Gott thut, das ist wohlgethan,” BWV 250, Cantata 100; “Sei Lob und Her dem höchsten Gut,” BWV 251, and Cantata 117; “Nun danket alle Gott,” BWV 252, Cantata 192; and “In allen meinen Taten,” BWV 367, Cantata 97. Elaborated chorale settings with orchestra, BWV 250-252, were composed c.1730 for sacred wedding service, before and after the nuptials and as a closing blessing. “In allen meinen Taten” is appropriate at any time during the wedding while the chorale Cantatas 100, 117, 192, and 197 could have been performed during a festive wedding service, before the sermon. “Nun danket all Gott” is listed just above and “Was Gott thut” is listed below as Ob. 112.

Some chorales have cross-referenced themes found in different hymnbooks and new texts were written to the same melody, especially new hymnbooks. Bach responded with increasing emphasis on trust themes, especially in psalms of lament settings: Ob. 97, Psalm 31, In te, Domine, speravi (In thee, Lord, do I put my trust); Ob. 101, Psalm 137, “An Wasserflussen Babylon,” Super fluminia (By the waters of Babylon); Ob. 106, and Psalm 42, “So wünsch’ ich nun ein’ gute Nacht,” Quemadmodum (As the hart panteth). The theme of “Cross, Persecution, and Tribulation also had elements of eschatology, especially in three “Great 18 Leipzig” organ chorale settings: Ob. 100, “Vor deinen Thron tret ich,” BWV 668; Ob. 101, “An Wasserflussen Babylon,” BWV 653; and melody “Von Gott will ich nicht lassen,” BWV 658, in chorale Cantata 107 “Was willst du dich betrüben” (for the 7th Sunday after Trinity). Bach set two other chorales as cantatas: Ob. 112, “Was Gott thut, das ist wohlgethan,” BWV 99 (Tr.21); and Ob. 113, “Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten,” BWV 93 (Tr.5). Bach also set a variety of chorales not listed in the Orgelbüchlein, emphasizing trust and guidance (after Ob. 113, below).

In time of trouble (Cross, Persecution & Tribulation, NLGB 275-304); (Christian Life & Conduct, Ob. 97-111) (Praise & Thanks)

97. “In dich hab’ ich gehoffet, Herr” (NLGB 254, Psalm 31); see OB 98, BWV 640;
98. BWV 640 — “In dich hab” (alio modo); BWV 244/3(PC), 247/5=1089(PC), BWV 717(MC);
99 . “Mag ich Unglück nicht widerstahn” (My I my fate no more withstand, NLGB 279, Cross), no Bach setting; Luther1526 Bar form trust Psalm 34:19, http://www.orgelbuechlein.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/12/99-Mag-ich-Unglück.pdf, https://hymnary.org/text/mag_ich_unglueck_nicht_widerstehn.
100. BWV 641 — “Wenn wir in höchsten Nöten sein/Vor deinen Thron tret ich” (NLGB No. 277, Cross); BWV 668(18); BWV 431-32(PC);
101. “An Wasserflussen Babylon” (Psalm 137), see above “In Time of trouble, a) The Church Militant (Psalm Hymns)”
102. “Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz” (NLGB 275, (Cross); CC BWV 138; BWV 420(PC), BWV 421(PC)=Anh. 159/2(motet);***
103. “Frisch auf, mein’ Seel’, verzage nicht” (Cheer up, my soul, fear not) (NLGB 283, Cross) [cf. Versage nicht, o frommer Christ, NLGB 282, Tr.15. or "Versage nicht, O Häuflein klein" (O Little Flock, FeNot the Foe, NLGB 317, God’s Word], melody from "Kommt her zu mir, spricht Gottes Sohn" (Mat. 11:28, peace & comfort); See OB 90 above
104. “Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid” (NLGB 287, Cross); PC BWV 3/6, 153/9, 44/4;
105. “Ach Gott, erhör’ mein Seufzen und Wehklagen,” BWV 254 (Terry, ibid.: No. 3);
106. “So wünsch’ ich nun ein’ gute Nacht” (NLGB 387, Psalm 42, Death & Dying), Johann Rist (1641), melody anon. (1736), BWV 502 (SG, Dying);
107. “Ach lieben Christen, seid getrost” (NLGB 326, Death & Dying); melody, “Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns halt,” see OB 119 above (Psalm hymn)
108. “Wenn dich Unglück thut greifen an” (NLGB 285 Cross); melody “Wen wir in höchsten Nöthen sein,” BWV 1104(NC), see Ob. 100 above***
109. “Keinen hat Gott verlassen” (NLGB 291, Cross), BWV 369(PC)=?247/41 (Rilling, v.79 Passion);
110. “Gott ist mein Heil, mein’ Hulf’ und Trost” (no NLGB), BWV 1106(NC);
111. “Was Gott thut, das ist wohlgethan, kein ein(z)ig Mensch ihn tadeln kann” (Riemenschneider 45 or Zahn 2524, no NLGB, Michael Altenberg; BWV 1116(NC);*
112. “Was Gott thut, das ist wohlgethan, es bleibt gerecht” (no NLGB); chorale Cantatas BWV 99, BWV100; BWV 340(PC)=12/7=69a/6; BWV 250(wedding), 100/6=75/7;***
113. BWV 642 — “Wer nur den lieben Gott läßt walten” (NLGB 303, Cross); chorale Cantata BWV 93, BWV 434(PC), BWV 647(SC)=BWV 93/4, BWV 690-91(KC);***
--- “Auf mein Herz, des Herren Tag”/“Jesu, meine Zuversicht,” BWV 145/1(PC);***
--- “Den Vater dort oben,” BWV 292(PC);*
--- “Gott lebet noch”; BWV 320(PC), BWV 461(SG);
— “Hilf Gott, laß mirs gelingen,”; BWV 343 (PC);
--- “In allen meinen Taten”; CC BWV 97(?wedding), BWV 367(PC);***
--- “Lobet den Herren, den Mächtigen König”(Praise & Thanks), CC 137(Tr.12);
--- “Steh ich bei meinem Gott”; BWV 503(SG), BWV deest (Wiemer 14, PC);
--- “Vergiß mein nicht, daß ich dein nicht vergesse,” BWV 504(SG);
--- “Warum soll ich mich denn grämen”; BWV 228/2(motet), BWV 422(PC);
--- “Was betrübst du dich, mein Herz,” BWV 427(PC)***
--- “Was willst du dich betrüben,” chorale Cantata 107 (Tr.7); melody “Von Gott will ich nicht lassen”** ***(NLGB 310 Word of God); BWV 73/5 BWV 417-419, BWV 658 (18); text “Gott fähret auf gen Himmel,” BWV 11/9(PC);
--- “Was bist du doch, o Seele, so betrübet”; BWV 435(PC);***
--- “Was willt du dich, o meine Seele, kränken,” BWV 424(PC)
--- “Wohl dem, der sich auf seinen Gott” (Trust), chorale Cantata 139 (Tr.23); mel., “Machs mit mir, Gott, nach deiner Güt,” See OB 138 (Death & Dying).

FOOTNOTES

1 See Ann Leahy, J. S. Bach’s “Leipzig” Chorale Preludes: Music, Text, Theology, ed. Robin A. Leaver, Contextual Bach Studies No. 3 (Lanham MD: Scarecrow Press, 2011: xxf.
2 These Schemelli-Gesangbuch settings and more are found in “Melodies with Continuo (Figured and Unfigured),” Nos. 406-487 in Charles S. Terry, The Four-Part Chorals of J. S. Bach, Edited with an historical Introduction, Notes, and critical Appendices (London: Oxford University Press, 1929, reprint 1964), the only collection of Bach chorales not found on-line (http://oll.libertyfund.org/people/charles-sanford-terry). “The Preface announced that about two hundred more melodies were ready for a second edition, should one be called for, as unhappily was not the case,” says Terry (http://oll.libertyfund.org/titles/2056). “It would seem, therefore, that Bach proposed to place his whole collection at Schemelli’s service.”
3 See Robin A. Leaver, “Chorale,” in Oxford Composer Companions: J. S. Bach (Oxford University Press, 1999: 93f). For an historical understanding of chorales, see Carl F. Schalk’s essay, “German Hymnody” in Hymnal Companion to the Lutheran Book of Worship, ed. Marilyn K. Stulken (Philadelphia PA: Fortress Press, 1981: 19ff, especially “The Period of Pietism (c16675-1750).”
4 Peter Williams, Bach: A Musical Biography (Cambridge University Press, 2016: 86).
5 Source indformation, Google Books

6 See Ulrich S. Leupold, “The German Mass and Order of Service: Martin Luther’s Preface, in Luther’s Works, Vol. 53, Liturgy and Hymns, trans. George MacDonald (Philadelphia PA: Fortress Press, 1967: 72).

————

To Come: Town Council Cantatas of Praise and Thanksgiving.

 

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