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Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

Systematic Discussions of Bach’s Other Vocal Works
Motet BWV 231
Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren

Discussions in the Week of February 15, 2004

Aryeh Oron wrote (February 15, 2004):
Motet BWV 231 – Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren - Introduction

The chosen work for this week’s discussion (February 15, 2004) is the Motet BWV 231 ‘Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren’ (Give glory, praise and honour).

Recordings, discussions & additional information

Your gate to the Motets BWV 225-231 - list of recordings, previous discussions, and additional information (texts & translations, score, commentaries, music examples, etc.) - is located at the page: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Vocal/BWV225-231.htm

Some Background

BWV 231 is a four-part motet for SATB, consisting of only verse 5 of the chorale ’Nun lob, mein Seel, den Herren’, by Johann Gramann (also known by the name Poliander). Bach used verse from this chorale in some of his cantatas - BWV 17, BWV 28, BWV 29, BWV 51, and BWV 167 – and in the chorale (Mvt. 2) of the Motet BWV 225.

The date of the composition is uncertain (probably after 1724), but this music for Gramann’s text has been attributed to Bach and was included in the Breitkopf und Härtel edition of the works of J.S. Bach.

Possibly this motet was the opening movement of one of Bach’s lost cantatas, because of its lavish instrumentation, which includes a cornet, 2 oboes, 3 trombones, an oboe da caccia (taille), a bassoon, 2 violins, a viola, a cello, a bass violin and the usual organ. Like the Motet BWV 230, it is a work of praise, including a joy motif in its prayer, but this time there is only one continuous chorus of four parts, which is sung in canon throughout.

This is the least recorded of the motets (less than 10 recordings), probably due its doubtful authencity. Most of the recorded sets of the motets include only BWV 225-230, leaving BWV 231 out. This week we have the opportunity to dedicate listening time for this work, hearing it on its own terms, and let our ears telling us if its relative negligence has been justified.

Let’s the discussion begins!

 

Discussions in the Week of December 30, 2012

Ed Myskowski wrote (December 29, 2012):
Weekly reminder

For the two coming weeks our discussion topics are:

Dec 30: Motet BWV 231

Jan 6: Motet BWV Anh 159

For Jan. 13 I plan to resume regular reminders for the cantata discussion topics.

Happy New Year

Charles Francis wrote (January 5, 2013):
BWV 231 / 28-2 Organ Transcription

While the four part motet BWV 231 has been mentioned as "spurious", the music does in fact occur elsewhere as a five part setting in Cantata BWV 28. Accordingly, it is the transcription which is questioned, rather than the music per se. One wonders, however, whether the second movement of BWV 28 could really be the original form, as the excellent formal counterpoint therein is at times compromised by the ad hoc divergence of the bass line. Perhaps, then, the original was indeed in four parts like BWV 231, and the 5-part texture found in BWV 28 was an afterthought.

A performance of my four part organ transcription of this music can be heard here: BWV 231 - Realizations

Julian Mincham wrote (January 5m, 2013):
[To Charles Francis]
I think it is misleading to describe the chorus from BWV 28 as 'five part'. The continuo doubles the vocal bass line for the most part except when the basses are silent (e.g. from bar 113 and again at 127) and at times when the sopranos are silent (e.g. from bar 79). This is a procedure not uncommon in motet like choruses in the cantatas e.g. BWV 38. This might be compared with the opening chorale fantasia of BWV 2 where the continuo line has a much greater (but not total) degree of doubling causing the texture to vary between 4 and 5 parts (when all parts are singing).

 

Motets BWV 225-231: Details
Recordings: 1900-1949 | 1950-1959 | 1961-1969 | 1970-1979 | 1980-1989 | 1990-1999 | 2000-2009 | 2010-2019
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Systematic Discussions: BWV 225 | BWV 226 | BWV 227 | BWV 228 | BWV 229 | BWV 230 | BWV 231 | BWV 225-231 - Summary
Individual Recordings:
Motets - K. Junghänel & Cantus Cölln | Motets - E. Ericson | Motets - D. Fasolis | Motets - N. Harnoncourt | Motets - R. Kammler | Motets - G. Schmidt-Gaden

Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

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Last update: ýApril 24, 2013 ý22:31:26