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Chorale Melodies: Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation

Chorale Melodies used in Bach's Vocal Works
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele

Melody & Text | Use of the CM by Bach | Use of the CM by other composers | Arrangements/Transcriptions

 

Melody & Text: Zahn: 6923 | EKG: 157

Text: Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele

By Johann Franck (1618-1677) (1649)

 

Melody:

By Johann Crüger in Geistliche Kirchen-Melodien (Berlin 1649).

>> The most important mid-17th-century chorale composer was Johannes Crüger, Kantor at the Nikolaikirche in Berlin (where from 1657 Paul Gerhardt was deacon) and the principal musical collaborator of both Gerhardt and Johann Heermann; his 70 original melodies include those for Gerhardt’s Wie soll ich dich empfangen (EKG 10) and Fröhlich soll mein Herze springen (EKG 27), for Heermann’s Herzliebster Jesu (EKG 60), and for Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (EKG 157) and Jesu, meine Freude both by Johann Franck. They are all distinguished by their fusion of simplicity suited to the congregation with expressive declamation and rhythmic flexibility, the latter being due largely to the incorporation of Calvinist models. As a hymnbook editor Crüger introduced the private devotional hymn (Erbauungslied) that prevailed in the second half of the 17th century; in his first collection, Newes vollkömliches Gesangbuch (1640), which bore the explicit designation ‘for home or church use’, the standard core of Reformation de tempore chorales appeared together with the new Trostlieder of Heermann and others. For the first time chorales were presented as melody and figured bass (instead of four-part harmonizations), a format obviously appropriate for home devotions at the keyboard and for church congregations with organ accompaniment. Organ accompaniment had been introduced in about 1600 but had become widespread only as many church choirs were dissolved in the wake of the Thirty Years War. Crüger modified the traditional Reformation melodies by adding large numbers of leading-note accidentals, which helped to erase the last vestiges of the church mode system in favour of major–minor tonality. The second edition, which appeared as Praxis pietatis melica, contained a larger number of contemporary chorales including 15 by Gerhardt. (Later editions reflected changing tastes, and with the 44th, the Praxis pietatis melica became the most reprinted hymnbook in Protestant history.)<<

Authors: Robert L. Marshall/Robin A. Leaver in Grove Music Online, ©Oxford University Press 2006, acc. 5/22/06

 

Hymnal versions Bach may have known:

Hymnal versions of the melody from the 2nd half of the 17th century:

Two sources with varying results claim to show the original shape of Crüger’s melody as it first appeared in 1749:

Another hymnal from the 2nd half of the 17th century has the melody given thus:

 

Use of the Chorale Melody by Bach:

Text: Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele | EKG: 157
Author: Johann Franck (1649)

Ver

Work

Mvt.

Year

Br

RE

KE

Di

BC

Score

Music Examples

1

BWV 180

Mvt. 1

1724

-

-

-

-

A149:1

-

Mvt. 1 (Leusink) [ram]

4

BWV 180

Mvt. 3

1724

-

-

-

-

A149:3

-

Mvt. 3 (Leusink) [ram]

9

BWV 180

Mvt. 7

1724

22

204

22

25

F171:1
A149:7

PDF
PDFv

Mvt. 7 (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 7 ver (MG) [midi] | Mvt. 7 (Leusink) [ram]

BWV 180/6: Breitkopf 22 (in Eb) and Dietel 25

 

Untexted:

Ver

Work

Mvt.

Year

Br

RE

KE

Di

BC

Score

Music Examples

-

BWV 654

-

Weimar

-

-

-

-

K77

-

Chorale Prelude (MG) [midi]

BWV 654(a): Chorale Prelude for Organ (Achtzehn Choräle No. 4), Weimar (BWV 654a) with revisions (BWV 654) in Leipzig, 1739/1742; 1746/1747; 1750.
BWV 759: (composer
Gottfried August Homilius, this is not included in the NBA)

 

Use of the Chorale Melody by other composers:

Johann Jacob Bach (1655-1718):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, for four voices and instruments (listed in Schweinfurt inventory of 1689)

Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767):
Sacred Cantata: Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (I) (libretto by Erdmann Neumeister), for 4 voices, strings, bc, 1:1253 (1721)
Sacred Cantata: Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (I), for 4 voices, oboe, strings, bc, 1:1254
Schmucke dich, o liebe Seele, 2 Chorale Preludes for Organ in E flat major, TWV 31:9-10 (1735)

Johann Gottfried Walther (1684-1748):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude (or Partita) for Organ, LV 52

Georg Friedrich Kauffmann (1679-1735):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ (1733)

Johann Caspar Vogler (1696-1763):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ

Gottfried August Homilius (1714-1785):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ (previously attributed to JS. Bach as BWV 769)
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ (previously attributed to JS. Bach as BWV Anh 74)
Schmücke Dich, O Liebe Seel, for organ & oboe

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ Op. 122 No. 5 (1896)

Ulrich Hildebrandt (1870-1940):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Choral for Organ

Max Reger (1873-1916):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ, Op. 67/36 (1902)

Peter Hurford (b 1930):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, Chorale Prelude for Organ

Guy Bovet (b 1942):
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, for Partita sopra for organ, in Deuxième livre d’orgue (1958-1961)
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, for organ, in Quatrième livre d’orgue (1964-1970)
Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele, for organ, in Nouvelles pièces d’orgue (1993)

 

Arrangements/Transcriptions of Bach's use of the Chorale Melody:

Arnold Schoenberg (1874-1951):
Orchestral arrangement of BWV 654 Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele (1922)

 

Sources: NBA, vols. III/2.1 & 2.2 in particular [Bärenreiter, 1954 to present] and the BWV ("Bach Werke Verzeichnis") [Breitkopf & Härtel, 1998]
The PDF files of the Chorales contributed by Margaret Greentree J.S. Bach Chorales
Software: Capella 2004 Software, version 5.1.
Prepared by Thomas Braatz & Aryeh Oron (May 2006)

Chorales BWV 250-438
Recordings | General Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Chorales in Bach's Vocal Works: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Hidden Chorale Melody Allusions | Passion Chorale
Individual Recordings:
Hilliard - Morimur | Chorales - Matt | Chorales - Rilling | Preludi ai Corali - Quartetto Italiani di Viola Da Gamba
References:
Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438
Texts & English Translations of Chorales:
Sorted by Title
Chorale Melodies:
Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation
MIDI files of the Chorales:
Cantatas BWV 1-197 | Other Vocal Works BWV 225-248 | Chorales BWV 250-438
Articles:
The Origin of the Texts of the Chorales [A. Schweitzer] | The Origin of the Melodies of the Chorales [A. Schweitzer] | The Chorale in the Church Service [A. Schweitzer] | Choral / Chorale [C.S. Terry] | The History of the Breitkopf Collection of J. S. Bach’s Four-Part Chorales [T. Braatz] | Chorale Melody Allusions in Bach's Vocal Works [T. Braatz]
Hymnals used by Bach | Abbreviations used for the Chorales | Links to other Sites on the Chorales

Chorale Melodies: Sorted by Title | 371 4-Part Chorales sorted by Breitkopf Number | Explanation

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Last update: ýMay 29, 2009 ý08:06:51