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Cantata BWV 111
Was mein Gott will, das g'scheh allzeit
Provenance

Thomas Braatz wrote (February 1, 2003):
The Autograph Score:

This score was probably inherited by W.F. Bach and in October of 1761, because of the property that his wife owned, he was forced to make a larger than expected contribution to the war effort (7-Years War), so he decided to sell the cantatas from the early part of this yearly (1725) cantata cycle, which were not complete in any case. The next owner that can be documented is Johann Georg Nacke (1718-1804), a cantor in the town of Oelsnitz. His initials and year (J.G.N. | 1762) appear on the score. After his death, this cantata and other Bachiana came into the possession of his successor as cantor: Johann Gottlob Schuster (1765-1839), who then sold it to Franz Hauser in 1833. In 1904 the BB purchased the Hauser collection which contained this score. During WWII the score was taken to the Silesian monastery in Grüssau and after the war (1946) in ended up in the Biblioteka Jagiellońska in Kraków where it is located today.

On the title page Bach wrote the following:

J.J. Doica (there is a fermata over the ‘i’ and ‘c’) 3. post Epiphan. Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh allzeit.

The Original Set of Parts:

It is very likely that this set went to Anna Magdalena who gave them to the St. Thomas School, but every trace of them has been lost. Three doublets which were separated from this set, went along with the autograph score and are now located in the BB.

The Text and 1st Performance:

Despite the theories that abound that Bach and a pastor who delivered the sermon on January 21, 1725 in Leipzig collaborated on writing the text, the NBA KB I/6 (1996) still believes that the librettist is unknown. This unknown librettist based the text on the chorale, “Was mein Gott will, das g’scheh allzeit” by Duke Albrecht of Prussia (1547) with the inclusion of 4th verse by an anonymous individual (Nürnberg, 1554). Verses 1 and 4 are used verbatim in mvts. 1 & 6. Mvts. 2 to 5 base their material upon the 2nd and 3rd verse of the chorale.

 

Cantata BWV 111: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | Discussions: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

References: Main Page | Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Other Vocal BWV 225-249 | Chorales BWV 250-300 | Chorales BWV 301-350 | Chorales BWV 351-400 | Chorales BWV 401-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-524 | Vocal Works BWV Anh | BGA | NBA | BC: A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | Sources
Discussions of BWV Numbering System: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3

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Last update: ýSeptember 27, 2011 ý08:03:52