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John Eliot Gardiner & Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists
Bach Cantatas & Other Vocal Works
General Discussions - Part 12

Continue from Part 11

Introduction

John Pike wrote (February 25, 2007):
I have rejoined all 3 groups. For those of you who may have joined since I left last summer (due to being overwhelmed with other commitments), I am writing to introduce myself. I am a General Practitioner in Bristol, UK. I am also a keen amateur violinist, and have loved Bach's music since I was a small child. It is as important to me as the air I breathe.

However, for the past few months I have been playing a lot of Mozart (which I also love) at home and in chamber music groups. On CD, I have listened to music by mainly other composers. Last week, I received the latest volume (22) in John Eliot Gardiner's Bach cantata pilgrimage, SDG 128. Listening to it felt like a sort of home-coming after so many months away from the great master. It includes 6 cantatas for Easter, 2 each for Easter Sunday, Monday and Tuesday, and very magnificent works they are too. I particularly love BWV 66 "Erfreut euch, ihr Herzen". The recordings of BWV 6 and 66 are different from those recorded in 1999 for DG, and the soloists are different. The latest release was recorded at St George's church, Eisenach, the town of Bach's birth, of course, and the church in which he was baptised (the original font is still there). I think they are very fine recordings. I know that not everyone on this list appreciates Gardiner's approach, but I am sure we would all agree that the music itself is unspeakably sublime. Listening to it was one of the reasons which compelled me to rejoin these lists, which I have missed a lot.

Earlier this month, my wife gave birth to a stillborn baby, an ordeal very similar to ones which Bach himself had to face far too often, and it is Bach that I turn to for consolation at such times. Indeed, a list member very kindly sent me a Bach recording when he heard our news. Bach manages to convey something of the deepest emotions of the human spirit which words can never do.

It is very good indeed to be back.

 

New John Eliot Bach Bach release

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (March 24, 2007):
http://www.monteverdi.co.uk/recordings/forthcoming.cfm

Has the details about a new release, with Johnny Depp on the cover (I'm joking, but it sure looks like him). But that does make me wonder if anyone else believes the photography used in this series, is out of place for a series of Bach cantatas.

I know many graphic designers whom I've shown this series to. I explain the idea about "well Bach's music is universal, so these photographs are a visual metaphors." There reply without fail "Dood, I'm a designer; and that's a big stretch."

Please remember in your replies:

1. I love this series, don't roast me alive for asking this ;)
2. I love the photography and think its beautiful.

Thanks

Ed Myskowski wrote (March 24, 2007):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< I know many graphic designers whom I've shown this series to. I explain the idea about "well Bach's music is universal, so these photographs are a visual metaphors." There reply without fail "Dood, I'm a designer; and that's a big stretch." >
In addition to the universality of the music, I think the cover art relates to the 'pilgrimage' concept.

Is the relevance of the design a stretch? Sure, but it is also tasteful, attractive, and eye-catching. If only more packaging were all of that. Indeed, any of that.

Peter Bright wrote (March 24, 2007):
[To Kim Patrick Clow] Hmm... looks a lot more like Keith Richards to me, albeit on a good day.I'd be more than happy with a picture of the human riff on a Bach cantatas disc, but Johnny Depp would be plain wrong...

Bill Brakstone wrote (March 24, 2007):

Let's not quibble about the cover art, but give thanks to those responsible for this series and give them the latitude for doing what they deem artistically appropriate regarding the packaging presentation.

I am a subscriber to the series, and have yet failed to find in each release one piece that gives me supreme pleasure. In this current release, the final chorus from the Cantata for Easter Tuesday, "Ein Herz, das seinen Jesum lebend weiess" BWV 134, is such a revelation. As with so many other pieces in Bach's Cantata output, it makes one wonder at the majesty and genius of this volume of works, and hope that someday those less fortunate than us who can not afford to delve into the entire output of the Cantatas will be able to hear and appreciate this music.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (March 25, 2007):
Bill Breakstone wrote:
< Let's not quibble about the cover art, but give thanks to those responsible for this series and give them the latitude for doing what they deem artistically appropriate regarding the packaging presentation. >
Now now, who quibbled? My original post (if you read it again), has nothing but effusive praise for this series and recordings. I only asked about the cover photography and the reactions I've receieved from it. Those reactions aren't any statements about the nature of the music, the people that made them or anything else.

I was considering the using the same design approach myself for some editions of Christoph Graupner cantatas I'm publishing. Every single person I showed mockups of my editions or pointed them to the John Eliot Gardiner series, told me the connection with sacred baroque music and the McCurryphotographs was quite a stretch and suggested I use something more "conventional."

That's all they said ;) Just a conversation really. Nothing etched in concrete ;)

Take care and have a great day!

Ed Myskowski wrote (March 25, 2007):
Kim Patrick Clow wrote:
< That's all they said ;) Just a conversation really. Nothing etched in concrete ;) >
A quibble from the resident stone carver (or one of them?): you would do better to etch in stone, cast in concrete.

As I already commented in response to the original post, I find the Gardiner cover art striking and effective. Those who disagree can 'get over it', 'go take a xxxking walk', or whatever.

Kim Patrick Clow wrote (March 25, 2007):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< you would do better to etch in stone, cast in concrete. >
To etch his own coughs

< As I already commented in response to the original post, I find the Gardiner cover art striking and effective. Those who disagree can 'get over it', 'go take a xxxking walk', or whatever. >
You like them, they don't. They're trained graphic designers, so well, they've got their own sets of ideas I suppose on what's good design and what's not.

Bill Brakstone wrote (March 25, 2007):
[To Ed Myskowski] Amen!

 

Blog Diskussionsforum Bach Cantata Pilgrimage 2000

Teri Noel Towe wrote (April 10, 2007):
With thanks to my good friend Mark W. in Wembley:

Click here: Blog Diskussionsforum Bach Cantata Pilgrimage 2000: http://s138620504.online.de/

 

Gardiner and Leusink

Bart O'Brien wrote (October 17, 2007):
I'm not a dedicated Bach nut. I've been away for a while listening to Bruckner, Stravinsky and people like that. Coming back to the Cantatas this time I was curious about two questions:

Are the Leusink recordings really as bad as I remember? Answer: Yes. I've now removed them from my collection.

Are the Gardiner-SDG recordings really as good as people say? Answer:
Yes. I began with the BWV 4 album, and I've now ordered some more.

So much for the autobiographical anecdote, but I have a topic of more general interest.

It is sometimes said that the Leusink set is the product of a heroic (or possibly foolhardy) project to record in one year a body of works that other groups take a decade or more to record, and so, it is quite understandable (endearing almost) that many things in the set are less than ideal.

But the Gardiner-SDG recordings come from a superhuman one-year project too. You might expect then that their quality on average could not be much higher than the Leusink recordings.

But the GarSDG quality is higher: much higher. That is the consensus.

So how could this difference in quality arise?

I can only think of two possible, maybe complementary reasons:

The Gardiner-SDG people are on average considerably better musicians than the Leusink people.

And/Or
Whereas the Leusink project team took a year to LEARN AND RECORD all the cantatas, the Gardiner-SDG team took a year to RECORD all the cantatas, and they were familiar with with pretty much all of them already - before the year started. So there was no need to learn them during the year.

I don't know if either of these reasons are true. They are just the only ones I can think of to explain the difference in quality. I'd be interested to hear from anybody who knows more about how these two projects were organised.

Uri Golomb wrote (October 17, 2007):
Bart O'Brien wrote:
< <snip>
So how could this difference in quality arise?
I can only think of two possible, maybe complementary reasons:
The Gardiner-SDG people are on average considerably better musicians than the Leusink people.
And/Or
Whereas the Leusink project team took a year to LEARN AND RECORD all the cantatas, the Gardiner-SDG team took a year to RECORD all the cantatas, and they were familiar with with pretty much all of them already - before the year started. So there was no need to learn them during the year. >
Well, I don't think the Leusink is all that bad (not all of it, anyway) -- but I do agree that the Gardiner is much better. I think explanation 1 is part of the reason: Gardiner is not only a better conductor than Leusink, but (because of that, and his reputation) is able to gather around him a better team of musicians. Explanation 2 is less convincing: I think many cantatas were done for the first time during the Pilgrimage (though obviously there were many cantatas that Gardiner and at least some of his musicians were previously familiar with).

I think there's another complementary explanation. AFAIK, the only musician who took part in each and every Pilgrimage concert, without exception, was Gardiner himself. The Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists are flexible-membership groups, and I think the line-up changed constantly. So soloists, choristers and instrumentalists had their "breaks" during 2000, and were able to come to their respective concerts relatively fresh (and, assuming they weren't too busy singing and playing in other projects, they might well have had time to study their parts -- which boosts up explanation 2). Leusink, on the other hand, employed more or less the same team throughout -- which could have its advantages, in terms of unified conception, but also its disadvantages, in terms of increased exhaustion for the musicians involved, especially in later stages of the project. (These are guesses -- I don't really know what went on in the sessions).

Another difference is that Leusink was done in studio, whereas the Gardiner recordings were live. You might expect that this would work in Leusink's favour (allowing for editing, correcting mistakes etc.); but live concerts often generate greater excitement and a stronger sense of unity.

The primary reason for the difference, though, is probably explanation 1: Gardiner was able to recruit the very best Baroque singers and players in Europe (and keep them fresh by varying his roster), and had the force of personality to galvanize them even in the streneous conditions of the Pilgrimage (more streneous than Leusink's -- Gardiner's musicians had to travel all over the place, whereas Leusink's groups always worked in the same location).

Robin Kinross wrote (October 18, 2007):
[To Uri Golomb] I think all this is true. From what I have heard from talking with players in both projects: pressured for time as they were, the Gardiner concerts got more preparation than the Leusink studio dates. The Leusink process was very rushed indeed, and some of the musicians felt the situation was one of exploitation -- they are not proud of that job.

On another of the complete recordings: someone who played on some of the Harnoncourt-Leonhardt recordings told me that they used to record bits of different cantatas in one day's work, according to what forces were needed in those movements, and who was available when. I think this may have happened with the Leusink recordings too, and maybe it's common in the recording business. By contrast, the Gardiner recordings were concerts: the musicians gathered that week, rehearsed those pieces over two days, played those pieces and none others in that week's concert. The results have a focus and intensity that you may not find in studio work.

Russell Telfer wrote (October 18, 2007):
Uri Golomb wrote:]
< I think there's another complementary explanation. AFAIK, the only musician who took part in each and every Pilgrimage concert, without exception, was Gardiner himself. The Monteverdi Choir and English Baroque Soloists are flexible-membership groups, and I think the line-up changed constantly. So soloists, choristers and instrumentalists had their "breaks" during 2000, and were able to come to their respective concerts relatively fresh (and, assuming they weren't too busy singing and playing in other projects, they might well have had time to study their parts -- which boosts up explanation >
Just a note of thanks to Uri and others who've contributed to this thread. I've found it useful and informative and I feel that Uri in particular has hit close to the truth - something to bear in mind when actually listening to the recordings. The wellbeing of the players and all the other factors mentioned can matter a great deal on performance day.

Drew wrote (October 19, 2007):
I've nearly completed a project of carefully listening to all the cantatas in one year -- following the church calender: a batch each week according to the Sunday or feast-day for which they were composed (just five Sundays left in the Trinity season and the Feast of the Reformation) -- and I must say it has been a great year
becoming better acquainted with the heart of Bach's surviving work.

One thing that has struck me throughout the year has been the strength of Gardiner's Cantata Pilgrimage performances. Certainly his reading of BWV 4 (Easter Sunday) is the most dramatic I have heard.

This week I am listening to the three surviving cantatas for the 19th Sunday after Trinity: BWV 48, BWV 5, and BWV 56.

I was somewhat familiar with BWV 48, "Ich elender Mensch," because I had the Suzuki recording (Vol. 14). But I was not struck by the opening chorus until I heard Gardiner's spine-tingling recording (BCP, Vol. 10). Truly this chorus is one of Bach's most inspired compositions - his music poignantly expressing the sorrow of human imperfection. And Gardiner seems to "get this" in his reading like no other conductor I have heard.

A few weeks ago I also enjoyed spending time with Gardiner's recording of the cantatas for the Feast of St. Michael and All Angels. Gardiner notes that this was a "highlight" batch of Cantatas - Bach, like Milton, found the subject of angelic / demonic conflict inspiring. I see that Gardiner recently did a St. Michael concert - anyone attend?

Uri Golomb wrote (October 19, 2007):
Robin Kinross wrote:
< On another of the complete recordings: someone who played on some of the Harnoncourt-Leonhardt recordings told me that they used to record bits of different cantatas in one day's work, according to what forces were needed in those movements, and who was available when. I think this may have happened with the Leusink recordings too, and maybe it's common in the recording business. By contrast, the Gardiner recordings were concerts: the musicians gathered that week, rehearsed those pieces over two days, played those pieces and none others in that week's concert. The results have a focus and intensity that you may not find in studio work. >
Yes, recording out of sequences is indeed standard studio practice. What this means is that all choruses and chorales arerecorded together, so that you don't have to pay the choir to sit around doing nothing during the arias; all soprano arias are done when the soprano is available; pieces requiring the whole orchestra might be taped separately from pieces requiring only a small instrumental group; and so forth. I know for a fact that this is how Richter, Rilling, Harnoncourt, Leonhardt, Koopman and Leusink did their recordings; I wouldn't be surprised if Suzuki -- and, indeed, Gardiner himself in his pre-Pilgrimage studio recordings -- did the same. Herreweghe said in an interview that he did his first St. Matthew (BWV 244) (and, presumably, many of his cantatas) that way, but insisted on doing his second St. Matthew (BWV 244) in sequence, even though it was done in studio. I think it's equivalent to the way films are done: I'm told that they are often done out of sequence, especially when different sets are involved (all the scenes that take place on a particular set are done together). OVPP recordings might be different: since you need all soloists there anyway for the choruses, it might make more economic to do the whole thing in sequence.

In my experience, it's still possible to simulate a convincing sense of continuity even when a recording is done out of sequence -- especially if the group had also done the same works live before. But of course, continuity is easier to achieve in a live (or at least sequential) context. One thing I forgot to mention about the Gardiner is that in many (all?) cases, they recorded parts of the rehearsals as well. This meant that some editing could be done -- if a passage went really wrong in the concert, but came out OK in the rehearsal, they had a back-up track available. This also meant that the musicians knew they didn't have to "play it safe" for the recording during the concert.

Douglas Cowling wrote (October 19, 2007):
Studio-created performances

Uri Golomb wrote:
< By contrast, the Gardiner recordings were concerts: the musicians gathered that week, rehearsed those pieces over two days, played those pieces and none others in that week's concert. The results have a focus and intensity that you may not find in studio work. >
Recording out sequence is particularly hazardous in large-scale narrative oratorios because it often leaves the conductor and editor to create the "performance" in the editing room. An egregious example is Robert King's recording of Händel's "Joshua" where the movements meander along without any real dramatic connection. I'd be almost willing to bet that the conductor worked on the individual movements and then just let the editor put in standard track cues.

Uri Golomb wrote (October 19, 2007):
[To Douglas Cowling] I agree that recording out of sequence increases the danger of a performance that sounds haphazard -- but such a result is not inevitable. On the other hand, live recording does not in itself guarantee cohesion or continuity: I've been to live performances which "meandered along without any real dramatic connection", as Doug Cowling put it, just as badly as some studio products. (It can even happen -- and does happen -- in operatic staged productions).

Bart O'Brien wrote (November 19, 2007):
Bart O'Brien wrote:
Discussing the difference in quality between the Gardiner and Leusink one-year products:
< So how could this difference in quality arise?
I can only think of two possible, maybe complementary reasons:
The Gardiner-SDG people are on average considerably better musicians than the Leusink people.
And/Or
Whereas the Leusink project team took a year to LEARN AND RECORD all the cantatas, the Gardiner-SDG team took a year to RECORD all the cantatas, and they were familiar with with pretty much all of them already - before the year started. So there was no need to learn them during the year.
I don't know if either of these reasons are true. They are just the only ones I can think of to explain the difference in quality. I'd be interested to hear from anybody who knows more about how these two projects were organised. >
Ha, replying to myself!

The standard format of each Gardiner album includes a page of notes by one of the musicians. In Volume 15 the violinist Kati Debretzeni tells us that in fact the musicians mostly DID LEARN the music within the year of the project.

She outlines the project's standard weekly cycle:Monday/Tuesday - Musicians learn music of next Sunday's cantatas at home:
Wednesday/Thursday - Rehearsals in London
Friday - Travel to concert location somewhere in Europe
Saturday - Rehearsal (recorded) at location
Sunday - Concert (recorded) at location + (I supppose) travel home

I believe a studio-recorded CD nowadays typically uses two or three days for rehearsal and recording; private preparation beforehand is of course unquantifiable. Therefore a project structure like the one above does seem to make it quite feasible to produce 50-60 CDs of excellent quality within one elapsed year, even if the many of the musicians don't know most of the music at the start of the year - given excellent musicians with tremendous stamina, of course.

I only have a few of the Gardiner albums so far. I'd be keen to know if the performer's notes in any of the other volumes give any more insight into the project structure and logistics.

Chris Kern wrote (November 20, 2007):
Bart O'Brien wrote:
<< And/Or
Whereas the Leusink project team took a year to LEARN AND RECORD all the cantatas, the Gardiner-SDG team took a year to RECORD all the cantatas, and they were familiar with with pretty much all of them already - before the year started. So there was no need to learn them during the year.
I don't know if either of these reasons are true. They are just the only ones I can think of to explain the difference in quality. >>
I missed this message the first time around. I don't understand what is meant by a "difference in quality". I can only speak to my own listening preferences, but for me, the Leusink cantata series is far better than the Gardiner one. The Leusink is competitive with the Rilling and L/H for me (almost always better than L/H), with the exception of the choral movements.

Terejia wrote (November 26, 2007):
Gardiner and Leusink - amateur choir vs professional choir

Chris Kern wrote:
< I missed this message the first time around. I don't understand what is meant by a "difference in quality". I can only speak to my own listening preferences, but for me, the Leusink cantata series is far better than the Gardiner one. The Leusink is competitive with the Rilling and L/H for me (almost always better than L/H), with the exception of the choral movements. >
Greeting Chris,

I'm not familiar with Leusink but I have some familiarity with Gardiner-I have some CDs. I concur Gardiner seems to have professional choir and the performance standard of professional choir is indeed high level in terms of technique.

From overall writing of this thread, I took Leusink employs Boy's choir, whose technical level may not be as high as Gardiner's English Soloists. Well...although I do appreciate high technical standard, be it a choir or solists or orchestra, when it comes to choir, for me, there seems to be something else other than technical elements working here. I don't know exactly what it is. Maybe straight communication to soul of the audience or maybe not? I wonder what would be the exact reason why Karl Richter intentionally refused to have professional singers in his Muenchner Bach Choir?

Since I'm new on this list, my apology in advance, if the point was already covered in the past exchanges of this forum.

 

Gardiner's Cantata Pilgrimage - Program for 1st Sunday after Epiphany

Drew (BWV846-893) wrote (January 10, 2008):
I found the following concert schedule (pasted in below this message) of Gardiner's cantata pilgrimage, and thought it interesting that he included a spurious cantata - BWV 217, "Gedenke, Herr, wie es uns" - in the program for the first Sunday after Epiphany (Jan. 9, 2000).

Why did Gardiner include BWV 217? There are thrextant cantatas for Epiphany 1 - BWV 154, BWV 32, BWV 124 - did he do it to fill up the program?

I listened to Helbich's recording of BWV 217 and, although it sounds too galant to be Bach (esp. the alto aria, No. 3), the opening chorus and closing chorale sound Bachian in places (because the composer was from the same region?).

Thoughts anyone?

___________________________________________________

Tour-Übersicht im Bachjahr 2000 von der
Bach Cantata Pilgrimage 2000
Ausführende:

The Monteverdi Choir

The English Baroque Soloists
Leitung:

Sir John Eliot Gardiner
-----------------------------

23. Dezember 1999
Herderkirche Weimar
(Auftaktkonzert)
BWV 248 Weihnachtsoratorium Kantaten 1-3
Sopran:Claron McFaddon
Alt:Bernarda Fink
Tenor:Christoph Genz
Bass:Dietrich Henschel
27.Dezember 1999
Herderkirche Weimar

BWV 248 Weihnachtsoratorium Kantaten 4-6
Sopran:Claron McFadden
Alt:Bernarda Fink
Tenor:Christoph Genz
Bass:Dietrich Henschel

01. Januar 2000 (Neujahr)
Gethsemanekirche, Berlin
BWV 16 Herr Gott, dich loben wir
BWV 41 Jesu, nun sei geprieset
BWV 143 Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele
BWV 171 Gott, wie dein Name
Tenor: James Gilchrist
-.-
06.Januar 2000 (Epiphanias)
Nicolaikirche Leipzig
BWV 248 / 5 Ehre sei Dir Gott gesungen
BWV 123 Liebster Immanuel, Herzog der Frommen
BWV 65 Sie werden aus Saba alle kommen
BWV 248 / 6 Herr wenn die stolzen Feinde
Sopran: Magdalena Kozena
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
09.Januar 2000 (1. Sonntag nach Epiphanias)
St Jacobi Hamburg
BWV 217 Gedenke, Herr, wie es uns gehet
BWV 154 Mein liebster Jesus ist verloren
BWV 32 Liebster Jesu, mein Verlangen
BWV 124 Meinen Jesum lass ich nicht
Sopran: Claron McFadden
Alt: Michael Chance
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
Datum ?
Old Royal Naval College Chapel, Greenwich
BWV 155 Mein Gott, wie lang, ach lange?
BWV 3 Ach Gott, wie manches Herzeleid I
BWV 13 Meine Seufzer, meine Tränen
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Richard Wyn Roberts
Tenor: Julian Podger
Bass: Gerald Finley

22. - 24. Januar 2000 (3. Sonntag nach Epiphanias)
Chiesa di San Marco, Milan
BWV 72 Alles nur nach Gottes Willen
BWV 73 Herr, wie du willt, so schicks mit mir
BWV 111 Was mein Gott will, das g´scheh allzeit
BWV 156 Ich steh mit einem Fuß im Grabe
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Sara Mingardo
Tenor: Julian Podger
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
-.-
2. Februar 2000 (St Mariä Reinigung)
Christchurch, Priority Church, Dorset
BWV 83 Erfreute Zeit im neuen Bunde
BWV 82 Ich habe genug
BWV 125 Mit Fried und Freud fahr ich dahin
BWV 200 Bekennen will ich seinen Namen
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
30. Januar 2000 (4. Sonntag nach Epipanias)
Romsey Abbey, Hampshire

BWV 26 Ach wie flüchtig, ach wie nichtig
BWV 81 Jesus schläft, was soll ich hoffen?
BWV 14 Wär Gott nicht mit uns diese Zeit
BWV 227 Jesu, meine Freude
Sopran: Joanne Lunn, Katharine Fuge
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Peter Harvey

20. Februar 2000 (Septuagesimae)
Naarden
BWV 144 Nimm, was dein ist und gehe hin
BWV 227 Jesu, meine Freude
BWV 84 Ich bin vergnügt in meinem Glücke
BWV 92 Ich hab in Gottes Herz und Sinn
Sopran: Miah Persson
Alt: Wilke te Brummelstroete
Tenor: James Oxley
Bass: John Bowley
(.)

5. März 2000 (Estomihi)
King´s College Chapel, Cambridge
BWV 22 Jesus nahm zu sich die Zwölfe
BWV 23 Du wahrer Gott und Davids Sohn
BWV 127 Herr Jesu Christ, wahr´Mensch und Gott
BWV 159 Sehet! Wir gehen hinauf nach Jerusalem
Sopran: Ruth Holton
Alt: Claudia Schubert
Tenor: James Oxley
Bass: Peter Harvey
(.)

26. März 2000 (Palmsonntag)
Walpole St Peter, Norfolk
BWV 182 Himmelskönig, sei willkommen
BWV 54 Wiederstehe doch der Sünde
BWV 1 Wie schön leuchtet der Morgenstern
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Claudia Schubert
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
23. April 2000 (1. Ostertag)
Georgenkirche, Eisenach
10 Uhr
Kantatengottesdienst
Liturgie und Musikalische Leitung: John Eliot Gardiner

23. April 2000 (1. Ostertag)
Georgenkirche, Eisenach
BWV 4 Christ lag in Todesbanden
BWV 1009 Cello Suite Nr. 3
BWV 6 Bleib bei uns, denn es will Abend werden
BWV 31 Der Himmel lacht
Sopran: Angharad Gruffydd Jones
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Cello: David Watkin

24. April 2000 (2. Ostertag)
Georgenkirche Eisenach
BWV 66 Erfreut Euch, ihr Herzen
BWV 1008 Cello Suite Nr. 2
BWV 6 Bleib bei uns, denn es will Abend werden
BWV 145 Ich lebe, mein Herze
Sopran: Angharad Gruffydd Jones
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Cello: David Watkin
-.-
25. April 2000 (3. Ostertag)
Georgenkirche, Eisenach
BWV 134 Ein Herz, das seinen Jesum
BWV 1010 Cello Suite Nr. 4
BWV 158 Der Friede sei mit dir
BWV 4 Christ lag in Todesbanden
BWV 145 Ich lebe, mein Herze
Sopran: Angharad Gruffydd Jones
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Cello: David Watkin
-.-
29. April 2000
Bachkirche Arnstadt
BWV 67 Halt im Gedächtnis Jesum Christ
Präludium und Fuge in C major
BWV 158 Der Friede sei mit dir
Fantasie und Fuge in C minor
Schütz: Motette: Verleih uns Frieden
Schütz: Motette: Gib unsern Fürsten
BWV 42 Am Abend aber desselbigen Sabats
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Orgelsolist: KMD Gottfried Preller (an der Bach- Orgel)
-.-
30. April 2000 (Quasimodogeniti)
Bachkirche Arnstadt
BWV 150 Nach dir, Herr verlanget mich
BWV 4 Christ lag in Todesbanden
BWV 67 Halt im Gedächtnis Jesum Christ
BWV 42 Am Abend aber desselbigen Sabbats
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Alt: Daniel TaylorBass: Stephen Varcoe
-.-
7. Mai 2000 (Misericordias Domini)
Basilique, Echternach, Luxembourg
BWV 104 Du Hirte Israel höre
BWV 85 Ich bin ein guter Hirte
BWV 112 Der Herr ist mein getreuer Hirt
BWV 1060 Konzert für Oboe und Violine
Solisten ?

13. Mai 2000
Peterskirche Görlitz
BWV 12 Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen
BWV 103 Ihr werdet weinen und heulen
BWV 146 Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal
Sopran: Brigitte Geller
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: Mark Padmore
Bass: Julian Clarkson
Orgel: Silas Standage

14. Mai 2000 (Jubilate)
Schlosskirche Altenburg
BWV 12 Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen
BWV 103 Ihr werdet weinen und heulen
BWV 146 Wir müssen durch viel Trübsal
Sopran: Brigitte Geller
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: Mark Padmore
Bass: Julian Clarkson
Orgel: Silas Standage (bei der Sinfonia in BWV 146 an der Trost-Orgel)

20. Mai 2000
St Paul´s Birmingham
BWV 166 Wo gehest du hin
BWV 108 Es ist euch gut, dass ich hingehe
BWV 117 Sei Lob und Ehr dem höchsten Gut
BWV 230 Motette: Lobet den Herrn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe

21. Mai 2000 (Cantate)
St Mary´s Warwick
BWV 166 Wo gehest du hin
BWV 108 Es ist euch gut, dass ich hingehe
BWV 117 Sei Lob und Ehr dem höchsten Gut
BWV 230 Motette: Lobet den Herrn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
Alt: Robin TysonTenor: James GilchristBass: Stephen Varcoe
-.-
27. Mai 2000
Annenkirche Dresden
BWV 86 Wahrlich, wahrlich, ich sage euch
BWV 87 Bisher habt ihr nichts gebeten
BWV 97 In allen meinen Taten
BWV 227 Jesu meine Freude
Solisten ?

28. Mai 2000 (Rogate)
Annenkirche, Dresden
BWV 86 Wahrlich, wahrlich, ich sage euch
BWV 87 Bisher habt ihr nichts gebeten
BWV 97 In allen meinen Taten
BWV 227 Jesu meine Freude
Solsiten ?

1. Juni 2000 (Himmelfahrt)
Salisbury Cathedral, Salisbury
BWV 37 Wer da gläubet und getauft wird
BWV 128 Auf Christi Himmelfahrt allein
BWV 43 Gott fähret auf mit Jauchzen
BWV 11 Lobet Gott in seinen Reichen
Solisten ?

4. Juni 2000 (Exaudi)
Sherborne Abbey, Sherborne
BWV 44 Sie werden euch in den Bann tun
BWV 183 Sie werden euch in den Bann tun
BWV 150 Nach dir Herr verlanget mich
J.C. Bach Motette: Fürchte dich nicht
Solisten ?

11. Juni 2000 (1. Pfingsttag)
Holy Trinity, Long Melford
BWV 172 Erschallet ihr Lieder
BWV 59 Wer mich liebet, der wird mein Wort halten
BWV 74 Wer mich liebet, der wird mein Wort halten
BWV 34 O ewiges Feuer, O Ursprung der Liebe
Sopran: Lisa Larsson
Alt: Derek Lee Ragin, Nathalie Stutzmann
Tenor: Christoph Genz
Bass: Panajotis Iconomou

Datum ?
Holy Trinity, Long Melford
BWV 1048 Brandenburgisches Konzert Nr 3
BWV 173 öhtes Fleisch und Blut
BWV 68 Also hat Gott die Welt geliebt
BWV 174 Ich liebe den Höchsten von ganzem Gemüte
Sopran: Lisa Larsson
Alt: Nathalie Stutzmann
Tenor: Cristoph Genz
Bass: Panajotis Iconomou
-.-
13. Juni 2000 (3. Pfingsttag)
Holy Trinity, Blythburg
BWV 1048 Brandenburgisches Konzert Nr 3
BWV 184 Erwünschtes Freudenlicht
BWV 175 Er rufet seine Schafe mit Namen
BWV 227 Jesu, meine Freude
Sopran: Lisa Larsson
Alt: Nathalie Stutzmann
Bass: Stephan Loges
-.-
18. Juni 2000 (Trinitatisfest)
St Magnus Cathedral, Kirkwall
BWV 165 O heilges Geist- und Wasserbad
BWV 176 Es ist ein trotzig und verzagt Ding
BWV 129 Gelobt sei der Herr
BWV 194 Höchsterwünschtes Freudenfest
Sopran: Ruth Holton
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
23. Juni 2000
St Giles, Cripplegate, London
BWV 167 Ihr Menschen, rühmet Gottes Liebe
BWV 7 Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam
BWV 30 Freue dich, erlöste Schar
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Wilke te Brumelstroete
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
24. Juni 2000 (Johannisfest)
St Giles, Cripplegate, London
BWV 167 Ihr Menschen, rühmet Gottes Liebe
BWV 7 Christ unser Herr zum Jordan kam
BWV 30 Freue dich, erlöste Schar
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Wilke te Brumelstroete
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
25. Juni 2000 (1. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St Giles, Cripplegate, London
BWV 75 Die Elenden sollen essen
BWV 39 Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot
BWV 20 O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort I
Sopran: Gilian Keith
Alt: Wilke te Brummelstroete
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
26. Juni 2000
St Giles, Cripplegate, London
BWV 75 Die Elenden sollen essen
BWV 39 Brich dem Hungrigen dein Brot
BWV 20 O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort I
Sopran: Gilian Keith
Alt: Wilke te Brummelstroete
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
1. Juli 2000 (2. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Strasbourg, St Guillaume
BWV 2 Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein
BWV 10 Meine Seele erhebt den Herrn
Schütz Motette: Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes
BWV 76 Die Himmel erzählen die Ehre Gottes
Solisten ?
(.)

15. Juli 2000
Royal Albert Hall, London
BWV 1069 Suite Nr. 4
BWV 24 Ein ungefärbt Gemüte
Brandenburgisches Konzert Nr 1
BWV 185 Barmherziges Herze der ewigen Liebe
BWV 243 Magnificat
Sopran: Miah Persson
Mezzo Sopran: Magdalena Kozena
Alt: Nathalie Stutzmann
Tenor: Paul Agnew
Bass: Nicholas Teste
-.-
23. Juli 2000 (5. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Divi Blasii, Mühlhausen
BWV 131 Aus der Tiefen rufe ich
BWV 93 Wer nur den lieben Gott lässt walten
BWV 88 Siehe, ich will viel Fischer aussenden
BWV 71 Gott ist mein König
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: Kobie van Rensburg
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
27.- 28. Juli 2000
Iona Abbey, Iona
BWV 161 Komm du süße Todesstunde
BWV 106 Actus Tragicus
BWV 131 Aus der Tiefen rufe ich
BWV 53 Schlage doch gewünschte Stunde
BWV 118 O Jesu Christ, meins Leben Licht
Sopran: N.N.
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Stephen Varcoe
-.-
30. Juni 2000 / 11 Uhr und 16 Uhr (6. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St. Gumbertus, Ansbach
BWV 170 Vergnügte Ruh, beliebte Seelenlust
BWV 9 Es ist das Heil uns kommen her
BWV 131 Aus der Tiefen rufe ich
Solisten ?

5. - 6. August 2000 (7. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St. Mary´s Parish Church, Haddington, East Lothian
BWV 186 Ärgre dich, O Seele nicht
Motette: Lobet den Herrn alle Heiden
BWV 107 Was willst du dich betrüben
Motette: Der Gerechte kommt um
BWV 187 Es wartet alles auf dich
Solisten ?

12. August 2000
St Marien, Lübeck
BWV 136 Erforsche mich Gott
BWV 178 Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält
BWV 228 Fürchte dich nicht
BWV 45 Es ist dir gesagt, Mensch
Motette: Der Gerechte kommt um
Solisten ?

13. August 2000 (8. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Christkirche, Rendsburg
BWV 136 Erforsche mich, Gott
BWV 178 Wo Gott der Herr nicht bei uns hält
BWV 228 Fürchte dich nicht
BWV 45 Es ist dir gesagt, Mensch
Solisten ?

19. August 2000 (9. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Pfarrkirche St Nikolaus, Merano
BWV 94 Was frag ich nach der Welt
BWV 168 Tue Rechnung! Donnerwort
BWV 105 Herr, gehe nicht ins Gericht
Sopran: Katharine Fuge
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
26. August 2000
St. Jacobi, Hamburg
BWV 46 Schauet doch und sehet
BWV 101 Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott
Brandenburgisches Konzert Nr 3
BWV 113 Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: Christoph Genz
Bass: Gotthold Schwarz
-.-
27. August 2000 (10. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Dom zu Braunschweig
BWV 46 Schauet doch und sehet
BWV 101 Nimm von uns, Herr, du treuer Gott
BWV 113 Herr, deine Augen sehen nach dem Glauben
Zugabe: "Vor deinen Thron tret ich hiermit"
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: Christoph Genz
Bass: Gotthold Schwarz
-.-
3. September 2000 (11. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St David´s Catedral, Wales

BWV 179 Siehe zu, dass deine Gottesfurcht nicht Heuchelei ist
BWV 199 Mein Herze schwimt im Blut
BWV 113 Herr Jesu Christ, du höchstes Gut
Sopran: Magdalena Kozena
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: Mark Padmore
Bass: Stephan Loges
-.-
9. September 2000
Marktkirche, Halle
BWV 35 Geist und Seele wird verwirret
BWV 69a Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele
BWV 137 Lobe den Herren
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: Christoph Genz
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
10. September 2000 (12. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St Jakobskirche, Köthen
BWV 35 Geist und Seele wird verwirret
BWV 69a Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele
BWV 137 Lobe den Herren
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: Christoph Genz
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
17. September 2000 (13. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Dreikönigskirche, Frankfurt

BWV 77 Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben
BWV 33 Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ
BWV 164 Ihr, die ihr euch von Christo nennet
Solisten ?

19. September 2000
Palais des Beaux Arts, Brüssel
BWV 77 Du sollt Gott, deinen Herren, lieben
BWV 33 Allein zu dir, Herr Jesu Christ
BWV 164 Ihr, die ihr euch von Christo nennet
Solisten ?

24. September 2000 (14. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Abbey d´Ambronay, Ambronay
BWV 25 Es ist nichts Gesundes an meinem Leibe
BWV 78 Jesu, der du meine Seele
BWV 17 Wer Dank opfert, der preiset mich
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
28. September 2000
Unser Lieben Frauen, Bremen
BWV 138 Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz?
BWV 99 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan II
BWV 51 Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen
BWV 100 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan III
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
29. September 2000 (Michaelisfest)
Unser Lieben Frauen, Bremen
BWV 50 Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft
BWV 130 Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir
BWV 19 Es erhub sich ein Streit
BWV 1043 Konzert für 2 Violinen und Orchester
BWV 149 Man singet mit Freuden vom Sieg
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Richard Wyn Roberts
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
30. September 2000
Mariendom, Velbert- Neviges
BWV 130 Herr Gott, dich loben alle wir
BWV 19 Es erhub sich ein Streit
BWV 1043 Konzert für 2 Violinen und Orchester
BWV 149 Man singet mit Freuden vom Sieg
BWV 50 Nun ist das Heil und die Kraft
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Richard Wyn Roberts
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
1. Oktober 2000 (15. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Münsterbasilika, Bonn
BWV 138 Warum betrübst du dich, mein Herz?
BWV 99 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan II
BWV 51 Jauchzet Gott in allen Landen
BWV 100 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan III
Sopran: Malin Hartelius
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
7. Oktober 2000
Kathedrale, Santiago de Compostela
BWV 161 Komm, du süße Todesstunde
BWV 27 Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende
BWV 8 Liebster Gott, wann werd ich sterben
BWV 95 Christus, der ist mein Leben
Sopran: Katharine Fuge
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: Mark Padmore
Bass: Thomas Guthrie
-.-
8. Oktober 2000 (16. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Lapa Church, Oporto
BWV 161 Komm, du süße Todesstunde
BWV 27 Wer weiß, wie nahe mir mein Ende
BWV 8 Liebster Gott, wann werd ich sterben
BWV 95 Christus, der ist mein Leben
Sopran: Katharine Fuge
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: Mark Padmore
Bass: Thomas Guthrie
-.-
14. Oktober 2000 (17. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Ort ?
Lund BWV 148 Bringet dem Herrn Ehre seines Namens
BWV 114 Ach, lieben Christen seid getrost
BWV 47 Wer sich selbst erhöhet
Solisten ?
-.-
15. Oktober 2000 (17. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Ort ?
BWV 148 Bringet dem Herrn Ehre seines Namens
BWV 114 Ach, lieben Christen seid getrost
BWV 47 Wer sich selbst erhöhet
Solisten ?
-.-
22. Oktober 2000 (18. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Thomaskirche, Leipzig
BWV 96 Herr Christ, der einge Gottessohn
BWV 169 Gott soll allein mein Herze haben
BWV 116 Du Friedefürst, Herr Jesu Christ
Solisten ?
-.-
29. Oktober 2000 (19. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Erlöserkirche, Potsdam
BWV 48 Ich elender Mensch, wer wird mich erlösen
BWV 5 Wo soll ich fliehen hin
BWV 90 Es reißet euch ein schrecklich Ende
BWV 56 Ich will den Kreuzstab gerne tragen
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
31. Oktober 2000 (Reformationstag)
Schlosskirche, Wittenberg
BWV 79 Gott der Herr ist Sonn und Schild
BWV 192 Nun danket alle Gott
BWV 80 Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: William Towers
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
4. November 2000
Genua
BWV 162 Ach, ich sehe itzt
BWV 180 Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele
BWV 49 Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen
Solisten ?

5. November 2000 (20. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Santa Maria spora, Minvera, Rom
BWV 162 Ach, ich sehe itzt
BWV 180 Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele
BWV 49 Ich geh und suche mit Verlangen
Solisten ?
-.-
10. November 2000
St John, Riga
BWV 109 Ich glaube, lieber Herr, hilf meinem Unglauben
BWV 38 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir
BWV 98 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan
BWV 188 Ich habe meine Zuversicht
Solisten ?
-.-
12. November 2000 (21. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
St Oleviste
BWV 109 Ich glaube, lieber Herr, hilf meinem Unglauben
BWV 38 Aus tiefer Not schrei ich zu dir
BWV 98 Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan
BWV 188 Ich habe meine Zuversicht
Solisten ?
-.-
18. November 2000
Abbey, Bath
BWV 89 Was soll ich aus dir machen, Ephraim
BWV 115 Mache dich, mein Geist bereit
BWV 55 Ich armer Mensch, ich Sündenknecht
BWV 60 O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort
Solisten ?

19. November 2000 (22. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Eton College Chapel, Windsor
BWV 89 Was soll ich aus dir machen, Ephraim
BWV 115 Mache dich, mein Geist bereit
BWV 55 Ich armer Mensch, ich Sündenknecht
BWV 60 O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort
Solisten ?
-.-
25. November 2000
Cantebury Cathedral
BWV 163 Nur jedem das Seine
BWV 139 Wohl dem, der sich auf seinen Gott
BWV 52 Falsche Welt, ich trau dir nicht
BWV 140 Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme
Solisten ?
-.-
26. November 2000 (23. Sonntag nach Trinitatis)
Winchester Cathedral
BWV 163 Nur jedem das Seine
BWV 139 Wohl dem, der sich auf seinen Gott
BWV 52 Falsche Welt, ich trau dir nicht
BWV 140 Wachet auf, ruft uns die Stimme
Solisten ?

3. Dezember 2000 (1. Advent)
St Maria im Kapitol, Köln
-.-
BWV 61 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 63 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 36 Schwingt freudig euch empor
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Oxley
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
4. Dezember 2000
Arsenal Concert Hall, Metz
BWV 61 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 63 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 36 Schwingt freudig euch empor
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Oxley
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
5. Dezember 2000
Auditorium, Dijon
BWV 61 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 63 Nun komm, der Heiden Heiland
BWV 36 Schwingt freudig euch empor
Sopran: Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson
Tenor: James Oxley
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
9. Dezember 2000
St. Michaelis, Lüneburg
BWV 70a Wachet! Betet! Wachet!
BWV 132 Bereitet die Wege, bereitet die Bahn
BWV 147 Herz und Mund und Tat und Leben
Motette: Der Gerechte kommt um
Sopran: Brigitte Geller
Alt: Michael Chance
Tenor: Jan Kobow
Bass: Dietrich Henschel
-.-
25. Dezember 2000 (1. Weihnachtstag)
St Batholomew´s Church, New York
BWV 91 Gelobet seist du, Jesu Christ
BWV 121 Christum wir sollen loben schon
BWV 40 Dazu ist erschienen der Sohn Gottes
BWV 110 Unser Mund sei voll Lachens
Sopran: Katharine Fuge, Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson, William Towers
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
27. Dezember 2000 (3. Weihnachtstag)
St Batholomew´s Church, New York
BWV 64 Sehet, welch eine Liebe hat uns der Vater erzeiget
BWV 151 Süßer Trost, mein Jesus kömmt
BWV 57 Selig ist der Mann
BWV 133 Ich freue mich in dir
Sopran: Katharine Fuge, Gillian Keith, Joanne Lunn
Alt: Robin Tyson, William Towers
Tenor: James Gilchrist
Bass: Peter Harvey
-.-
31. Dezember 2000 (1. Sonntag nach Weihnachten)
St Batholomew´s Church, New York
(Abschlusskonzert)
BWV 152 Tritt auf die Glaubensbahn
BWV 225 Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied!
BWV 122 Das neugeborne Kindelein
Sanctus aus BWV 232
BWV 28 Gottlob! Nun geht das Jahr zu Ende
BWV 190 Singet dem Herrn ein neues Lied!
Sopran: Katharine Fuge, Gillian Keith, Joanne Lunn
Alt: Daniel Taylor
Tenor: James Gilchrist

 

Continue on Part 13

John Eliot Gardiner: Short Biography | Monteverdi Choir | English Baroque Soloists
Recordings of Vocal Works:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Videos | Recordings of Instrumental Works
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Part 6 | Part 7 | Part 8 | Part 9 | Part 10 | Part 11 | Part 12 | Part 13 | Part 14 | Newsletters
Cantatas:
Cantatas BWV 106, 118b, 198 | Cantatas BWV 140, 147 | Cantatas BWV 11, 37, 43, 128 | Cantatas BWV 6, 66 | Cantatas BWV 72, 73, 111, 156 | Cantatas BWV 82, 83, 125, 200
Bach Cantata Pilgrimage:
BCP - Vols 1&8 | BCP - Vol. 6 | BCP - Vol. 9 | BCP - Vol. 13 | BCP - Vol. 14 | BCP - Vol. 15 | BCP - Vol. 21 | BCP - Vol. 22 | BCP - Vol. 23 | BCP - Vol. 24 | BCP - Vol. 26 | Bach Cantata Pilgrimage DVD | DVD John Eliot Gardiner in Rehearsal
Other Vocal Works:
BWV 232 - J.E. Gardiner | BWV 244 - J.E. Gardiner | BWV 245 - J.E. Gardiner | BWV 248 - J.E. Gardiner | BWV 1127 - J.E. Gardiner
Table of recordings by BWV Number

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Introduction | Cantatas | Other Vocal | Instrumental | Performers | General Topics | Articles | Books | Movies | New
Biographies | Texts & Translations | Scores | References | Commentaries | Music | Concerts | Festivals | Tour | Art & Memorabilia
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Last update: ıMay 31, 2010 ı02:14:31