Recordings/Discussions
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Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242
General Discussions

Marcos Maffei wrote (July 17, 1999):
I've just bought a Bach recording that moved me deeply - and sort of unexpectedly. It's the Lutheran Masses, Volume 1 (BWV 234-5) (15), with The Purcell Quartet and soloists (Suzan Gritton/Robin Blaze/Mark Padmore/Peter Harvey - Chandos 0642).

I couldn't remember if anybody had already commented anything about it in this list, but instead of searching for it in the archives, I decided to share here my impressions.

It's played in a very intimate, chamberlike way: no choirs, just the four solo voices, plus 2 violins, viola, cello, organ, violone and 2 flutes (BWV 234) or 2 oboes (BWV 235). Such approach perhaps doesn't make much sense in musicological terms (it's hard to figure a historical situation in which a Mass would be sung by soloists rather than by a choir), but musically it sounds astonishingly beautiful. And particularly so BWV 234; for instance, to have only one voice for each part entering in the touching harmonic progression of the Christe Eleyson seems to give it a much more intense feeling than a choir would have, and so on. But in both masses an enhanced and wonderful cohesion is attained by having instead of a full choir just the four soloists singing together in the outer movements that frames their original arias. And, of course, the clarity in which you hear everything that's happening is amazing; a deeply rewarding an moving recording.

As for why I found it unexpected: I never cared much for these Masses. I've bought a complete set of them a long time ago (I don't remember with whom, just that it was an Archiv recording), and after hearing them two or three times and being not particularly impressed (not as exciting as the B minor, some cantatas, the Passions...) it became one of the least played Bach records of my vinyl collection (that no longer exists). So, it was with a sort of idle curiosity that I decided to hear this new cd in the store: and I found it awesome. (leaving me with this - sort of idle - question: was it the way they choose to record them, or just the twenty or so years that have passed since I've first heard them?)

BTW, although being a subscriber since september 1998, this is my first posting to this very interesting list; my name is Marcos Maffei, and I'm a writer from Brazil (sorry for the mistakes in my English). As for how I stand here, let me say that I'm a Gould and Herreweghe fan, don't understand why T. Pinnock is so lavislhy praised, don't care much about Gardiner, have my AoFs with Savall, Keller quartet and Berliner saxophon quartet (and will eventually buy it with Nikolayevna), MOs with Ensemble Sonnerie and Musica Antiqua Köln, WTC's with Gould, Nikolayevna, D. Moroney (and intend to have it with Sviatsolav Richter), and found Tureck's Goldberg utterly disappointing...

 

Gloria from BWV 233

Piotr Stanislawski wrote:
More than sure I will play several times perhaps the most powerful and joyful Gloria in Excelsis Deo ever written from Mass in F major (BWV 233, Herreweghe) (9). I can not keep from dancing (or something similar to that) when I listen to it.

Matthew Westphal wrote (January 7, 2000):
(To Piotr Stanislawski) You think Herreweghe's performance (9) is powerful and joyful? It is quite good, but you should hear McCreesh's (14)!

Piotr Stanislawski wrote (January 7, 2000):
(To Matthew Westphal) I heard it, it fact it is even more powerful rendition than Herreweghe's one (9) - I mean it is played with more power. But it does not mean the more power = more joyful. Joy comes from the spirit, and I found Herreweghe's one more spiritual.

 

Recordings of Mass in A Major BWV 234 (in Discussion about Cantata BWV 136)

Aryeh Oron wrote (August 13, 2000):
Bach adapted the music of the first chorus of cantata BWV 136 as the 'Cum Sancto Spiritu' of the short Mass in A Major BWV 234. About this adaptation wrote Whittaker that it: "…does less violence than in the case of other rearrangements of these odd pasticci. As a matter of fact it sounds very much finer in the Latin version than in the German, and one is less conscious of its occasional defects".

Before reviewing the recording of this movement, I have to admit that I do not agree with Whittaker. I like the arrangement of the cantata much more.

(3) (Rilling) The singing here is large-scale and smooth. It is very different from Rilling's recording of the opening Chorus of the cantata.

(5) (Flämig) The singing here is also large-scale, but it is more jumpy and varied, and these qualities are more to my taste.

(6) (Corboz) My first thought when I listened to this was 'it is too slow'. My second thought after listening to it again remained the same. Sometimes renderings of Bach's music may be convincing even if they are very slow. But it can convince only if it has this mysterious quality, which we can call internal rhythm. In Jazz music it is called 'swing'. This 'swing' is totally missing here.

(7) (Hickox) I have this recording only on LP, and I was not able to listen to it.

(9) (Herreweghe) This performance starts also slowly, but it is gaining immediate momentum. The singing sounds to my ears like OVPP (or, at least, very small choir). It has clarity, transparency and liveliness. IMHO, this is the best recording of this movement.

Conclusion

Among the recordings of Cum Sancto Spiritu from BWV 234 my favourite is Herreweghe and the less convincing is Corboz.

 

Luterhan Masses

JohSebastianBach wrote (July 17, 2000):
(15) (16) < Galina Kolomietz wrote: I also like both volumes of the Lutheran Masses, both of which are OVPP. >
Ah, yes, but the performances with Purcell Quartet on Chandos Chaconne are unsurpassable!

 

Purcell Quartet's Bach: Masses & Trios

Harry Steinman wrote (August 16, 2000):
Some months ago the Paul McCreesh so-called 'Epiphany Mass' (14) was a subject of discussion and for me, the highlight of that recording was the so-called 'Lutheran Mass' in F Major, BWV 233. I recently found that the Purcell Quartet recorded this and several other short masses on two CD's, (Chandos 0652, 0653) (15) (16) and it's given me an opportunity to compare McCreesh's recording to that of the Purcell Quartet. And the PQ's inclusion of the Trio Sonata, BWV 529, led me to the ensemble's transcription and recording of these six works, BWV 525-530, also on Chandos, 0654.

I'm trying to figure out what is the common denominator between the Masses and the Trio Sonatas. Why did PQ choose those works? I don't know what they were thinking (perhaps I can e-mail them and ask!). The sonatas are transcribed for 2 violins, a viola de gamba and harpsichord and there is a very warm, rich hue in the recording. The instrumentalists are assisted on the Masses by various oboists (including Anthony Robson), flutists, cellists, violin and violists and an organ, but the sound (at least to me) is of reduced forces. Certainly the performance is OVPP (one voice per part) for all of the singers (including counter-tenors Michael Chance and Robin Blaze; Mark Padmore, tenor; Peter Harvey, bass, and Susan Gritton and my own personal favorite, Nancy Argenta, as clear, strong and nimble as ever).

First of all, let me say that I'm a fan of the McCreesh recording of the F Major Mass (a BIG fan!), but there are some things about the Purcell recording that I enjoy more. The PQ has a clarity that I don't hear in McCreesh. Is that because the Purcell version is OVPP? Is it because McCreesh places the microphones in the middle of the church in which the recording was made, producing what some call a muddy sound? I don't know! But I enjoy the sense of urgency that McCreesh brings to the work (listen especially to the 2nd movement, the Gloria, with its race among the voices, strings, oboes and the horns). I also believe that I hear the bass/cello accompaniment more clearly in the McCreesh recording. On balance, the Purcell recording has the voice of Nancy Argenta, which for me, is a big attraction, as is the clarity achieved by the simple voices and accompaniment.

Another highlight of Vol.2 is the opening of the Gloria from the G MajorMass, BWV 236. The first several measures are sung by Argenta and Blaze in a perfect blend of the two voices that pinned me to my chair. When bass Peter Harvey finally comes, it's just perfect. If you think you'd like Argenta and Blaze then you must hear their singing of the Domine Deus duet. I've heard it said that Chance's lower range is weaker than Robin Blaze, who is the counter-tenor on the first volume, but I do not hear any deficiency at all!

I also recently listened to the A Major Mass, BWV 234, the "Cum Santo Spiritu" and compared it to the opening chorus of "Erforsche mich, Gott, und erfahre, mein Herz", BWV 136, and the topic of this week's cantata study on the companion "Cantata Recordings" list. Both works use the same music. And again, I enjoyed the PQ version of the Mass' movement more than the cantata version, in this case recorded by Koopman. Although Koopman's treatment of the work drew fairly high plaudits by the cantata pundits, I liked the simple, elegant powerful and crisp version on the PQ recording.

The accompaniment by the PQ and friends holds its own with these singers and while I can't decide whether I enjoy the slightly greater forces in McCreesh's recording or those in the PQ, I haven't gotten a bit weary of alternating between the two and I suspect that I shall never manage to come to any conclusion. I like these recordings an Awful Lot.

The accompanying booklets for two of the three PQ CD's were penned by Richard Boothby, the group's cellist/viola de gambist and are useful and are useful, even for a non-musician like me.

So...I do recommend these recordings with the caveat that if OVPP isn't your cup of tea, you might get a bit less out of the Masses. I like OVPP as much as full choruses, so I like what I hear. The Trio Sonatas are very nice to listen to and are very well recorded (as are the Masses). So, if you're poking around for something to listen to, here are 3 discs from some musicians who clearly love their Bach and do the works proud.

Well, of to listen to even More Bach. Y'all be cool...

Thomas Boyce wrote (August 16, 2000):
(To Harry Steinman) (15) (16) Thanks! And duly noted.

Pascal Bedaton wrote (August 16, 2000):
(15) (16) I bought the 1st volume last year before having read a good paper on it in a magazine. I have waited the 2nd one for months and I bought it last month.

I found it very good, nearly close to "my" reference by Herreweghe but different due to the one-per-part.

If I can say 2 word, buy it!

 

Lutheran Masses

Harry Steinman wrote:
(While I'm on the subject of the Purcell [Quartet recording of the "Lutheran"] masses, and forgive me from straying from a strict discussion of the cantata of the week, but if one were to accept my recommendation and acquire the Purcell masses, I'd love to recommend that you compare Purcell's version of the F Major mass, BWV 233 (16) with that of Paul McCreesh on his "Epiphany Mass" CD (Archiv 457 631-2) (14) I love the McCreesh work, and I think that a full chorus sounds more 'taut' and more powerful than the OVPP approach, but the singing just sounds better for Purcell's OVPP approach. I keep listening to the two of them and I just can't decide!)

Matthew Westphal wrote (August 17, 2000):
(To Harry Steinman) Just to clarify: I'm not sure I'd want to call McCreesh's forces (14) for the Mass in F a "full chorus". His forces were 3-2-2-2 for the choruses in the Mass. For "Sie werden aus Saba kommen" he used 3-2-2-2 in the choruses, but deployed as concertists (soloists singing throughout) and ripienists (joining in intermittently). (McCreesh has told me that original performing parts for these two works have not survived.) For the Sanctus and "Schmücke dich, o liebe Seele" he used one singer per part only.

Harry Steinman wrote (August 17, 2000):
(To Matthew Westphal) Thanks for the clarification. Interestingly, I did some searching and just found a review, in Gramophone Early Music by Bernard Sherman that compares the McCreesh (14) and Purcell Quartet (16) F Major Masses. (It's at http://www.kdsi.net/~sherman/purcellqt.htm) The reviewer refers to McCreesh's version as "two singers per part" I can't necessarily tell, as I listen, that the singers are only 3-2-2-2 v. a full chorus...but I can surely hear that the PQ version is OVPP!

Thanks for the clarification!

Claus Kretzschmar wrote (August 19, 2000):
(To Matthew Westphal) The Purcell Quartet recordings of the Four Short Masses (15) (16), which are in fact, de facto cantatas because they are largely parodies of cantata movements, are absolutely the non-pareil, the ne plus ultra.

And, as he so often does, McCreesh (14) dissembles when he says the performance parts for the Missa Breves do not survive. Technically, he is correct, but the original performing parts for some of the cantatas from which they are parodied DO survive, and those are all one voice per vocal line. I am certain when it comes to BWV 187, from which much of the G Minor Missa Brevis is parodied, for I have had the privilege of examining the original parts.

Matthew Westphal wrote (August 19, 2000):
< Claus Kretzschmar wrote: The Purcell Quartet recordings of the Four Short Masses (15) (16), which are in fact, de facto cantatas because they are largely parodies of cantata movements, are absolutely the non pareil, the ne plus ultra. >
Settings of the Lutheran Missa brevis are "de facto" cantatas because the music was adapted from cantata movements?

I'm not sure that makes any sense logically...

Is the B-Minor Mass (BWV 232) a de facto cantata?

Is Hercules auf den Scheidewege (BWV 213) a de facto Christmas cantata? (It was adapted from parts 3 and 4 of the Christmas Oratorio.)

< And, as he so often does, McCreesh dissembles when he says the performance parts for the Missa Breves do not survive. Technically, he is correct, >
Then he's not dissembling, is he?

< but the original performing parts for some of the cantatas from which they are parodied DO survive, and those are all one voice per vocal line. I am certain when it comes to BWV 187, from which much of the G Minor Missa Brevis is parodied, for I have had the privilege of examining the original parts. >
Actually, the notes say the following:
"In these performances a pragmatic position has been taken, especially as Bach's performance material does not survive for these works."

I take "these works" to mean the works on the Epiphany Mass recording -- that is, Cantatas BWV 180 and BWV 65, the Missa in F Major and the Sanctus BWV 238 -- and not the four Missa Breves. For what that's worth.

I don't know myself if performance material survives for the cantatas from which the Missa in F is drawn, but when I last interviewed McCreesh (April of this year), he indicated that it does not. (What he said was, "We looked at the cantatas the music [for the Missa] came from, and there was no help there either," meaning hints as to whether Bach may have used ripienists.)

As time goes on, McCreesh seems to be getting more hard-line about one-voice-per-part Bach, particularly for recordings. For concerts, he will sometimes use two per part or occasionally even three of that's what a particular presenter insists on. (It's the presenter who is paying the fee, after all.)

Also, for large works such as the Passions, when on tour he'll often use one singer on each choral part (two per part in the St. John, following the performance materials) but separate soloists who don't sing in the choruses. He does this because concert tours are generally very strenuous and if the singers get too tired, then the performance suffers -- and the music, the musicians and the one-voice-per-part practice all come out looking the worse for it. One friend of mine, a concert presenter in New York, thinks this is cheating; I think that it's a very reasonable compromise -- as long as the choruses are performed one-singer-per-part (and those singers are good),it doesn't bother me much if those singers aren't the same ones doing the solos. What do you all think about that?

John Hartford wrote (August 19, 2000):
< Matthew Westphal wrote: Is Hercules auf den Scheidewege (BWV 213) a de facto Christmas cantata? (It was adapted from parts 3 and 4 of the Christmas Oratorio.) >
Other way around, I believe.

Matthew Westphal wrote (August 19, 2000):
<< Matthew Westphal wrote: Is Hercules auf den Scheidewege (BWV 213) a de facto Christmas cantata? (It was adapted from parts 3 and 4 of the Christmas Oratorio.) >>
< JSB wrote (replying to me): Other way around, I believe. >
I had thought that was the case, but an old Gramophone review posted at Amazon implied otherwise. (Given the choice, I'll go with you, JSB.)

Good -- that makes for an even better rhetorical question (and the one I had first hoped to pose): Are Parts 3 and 4 of the Christmas oratorio a de facto "dramma per musica" because they were adapted from Hercules auf dem Scheidewege?

Harry Steinman wrote (August 19, 2000):
< Matthew Westphal wrote: That makes for an even better rhetorical question (and the one I had first hoped to pose): Are Parts 3 and 4 of the Christmas oratorio a de facto "dramma per musica" because they were adapted from Hercules auf dem Scheidewege? >
Um...interesting question. Only thing is, what's a "dramma per musica"?

Johan van Veen wrote (August 22, 2000):
< Matthew Westphal wrote: Also, for large works such as the Passions, when on tour he'll often use one singer on each choral part (two per part in the St. John, following the performance materials) but separate soloists who don't sing in the choruses. He does this because concert tours are generally very strenuous and if the singers get too tired, then the performance suffers -- and the music, the musicians and the one-voice-per-part practice all come out looking the worse for it. One friend of mine, a concert presenter in New York, thinks this is cheating; I think that it's a very reasonable compromise -- as long as the choruses are performed one-singer-per-part (and those singers are good), it doesn't bother me much if those singers aren't the same ones doing the solos. What do you all think about that? >
I agree. What matters is the character of the voices used: considering the fact that Bach's soloists were "ensemble singers" there shouldn't be a big difference in character between the "soloists" and the "choir". The soloists should be such that they could sing in the ensemble, if they had to, without disturbing the overall sound. If that is the only compromise a conductor has to make to modern concert life, than he (and the audience) should be happy. Finding the right venue is far more important and often far more difficult.

 

The Purcell Quartet Missa Breves

Teri Noel Towe wrote (December 1, 2000):
(15) (16) < Galina Kolomietz wrote (November 29, 2000): Missae Breves, Purcell Quartet on Chandos >
Thank you for reminding me that these appeared in 2000.

If it is possible to wear out CDs by playing them too often, I am in danger of doing so with these recordings. I have been passionately fond of the pieces since my teenage years (back in the dark ages, believe me!), and I cannot conceive of finer performances than the ones given by the Purcell Quartet, et al.

Stupendous!

Harry J. Steinman wrote (December 1, 2000):
(15) (16) I shall add my rave about the Purcell Q releases...they are wonderful. And when I submit my nominations for the year's best, these shall be included!

 

Sanctus in c

Douglas Cowling wrote (November 6, 2005):
Richard wrote:
< Any Bach's Music lover feels that this music is Bach's... However, there is some strange writing, exactly like in The C Sanctus, probably not by Bach but so "Bachian...". Bach could have improved some contemporary works, add trumpets and counterpoint, like he did for his own music ( Gloria of b minor Mass, probably come from an earlier concerto grosso). >
The C Major Sanctus is a stunning work and another example of how we should know more about the composers like Hoffmann whom Bach admired and whose works he performed. What is the scholarly opinion on who wrote the C major Sanctus?

Thomas Braatz wrote (November 6, 2005):
Doug Cowling asked:
>>What is the scholarly opinion on who wrote the C major Sanctus?<<
The NBA KB II/2 states regarding BWV 237 that the doubts raised by Hans Theordore David (1961) and Christoph Wolff regarding the authenticity of this work are insufficient in the face of rather clear evidence: "Das Werk hat demzufolge solange als echt zu gelten, bis das Gegenteil nachgewiesen wird" ["This work, accordingly, is to be considered authentic until contrary proof can be offered."] The reasons given (more than can be listed here) are 1) an autograph composing score with numerous corrections (it even has a "JJ" at the head of the title); 2) J. A. Kuhnau's original parts with corrections by Bach; and 3) CPE Bach's confirmation of his father's authorship on the cover page.

Douglas Cowling wrote (November 6, 2005):
Thomas Braatz wrote:
< The NBA KB II/2 states regarding BWV 237 that the doubts raised by Hans Theordore David (1961) and Christoph Wolff regarding the authenticity of this work are insufficient in the face of rather clear evidence: >
HURRAY! It's wonderful piece and I have always thought it would be the perfect Christmas Sanctus with "Christen Atzet diesen Tag"

 

BWV 235 Kyrie

Chris Kern wrote (March 10, 2006):
I find the Kyrie of the BWV 235 Mass in G Minor to have a rather interesting and unusual (at least in my experience of Bach) construction. It consists of three separate sections all starting with the same orchestral ritornello, and then the third fugal section segues almost seamlessly back into the first one. That segue especially strikes me as rather un-Bachian but maybe there are other examples of this in his writing as well.

Thomas Braatz wrote (March 10, 2006):
[To Chris Kern] Check Alfred Dürr's analysis of mvt. 1 in his book on the cantatas and search for further analysis on Aryeh Oron's BCW Bach Cantata Website under BWV 102 Mvt. 1 on which this mvt. is based.

 

Bach Mass in F

Monte Garrett wrote (October 5, 2006):
I have programmed Bach's Mass in F with my college choir this semester and am curious if John Eliot Gardiner has recorded it. I haven't done a thorough search, but haven't yet found it, if it exists. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (October 6, 2006):
[To Monte Garrett]

Berkshire Record Outlet
Bach, Christmas Oratorio; St. Matthew Passion; St. John Passion; Mass in b. (Vocal soloists include Anthony Rolfe Johnson, Anne Sofie Von Otter, Barbara Bonney & Olaf Bar. The Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists/ Gardiner)
Add to cart | Price: $ 44.91 | 9 in set. | Country: GERMANY | D/A code: Digital | Code: 469769-2 | BRO Code: 121371 | Label: DG ARCHIV Genre: Choral

Bradley Lehman wrote (October 6, 2006):
< I have programmed Bach's Mass in F with my college choir this semester and am curious if John Eliot Gardiner has recorded it. I haven't done a thorough search, but haven't yet found it, if it exists. >
I don't know of one by Gardiner in that piece (BWV 233). But, the recordings by the Purcell Quartet and by Herreweghe are both excellent.

Parts of this mass reuse movements from cantatas BWV 102 and BWV 40...which Gardiner obviously has recorded. It's always worth comparing such bits where Bach has reused his music, to get ideas about the music's possible characters.

Get a good horn player! I performed this piece a few years ago (as continuo organist) and recall that there was some tricky stuff there.

Yoël L. Arbeitman wrote (October 6, 2006):
Bradley Lehman wrote:
< I don't know of one by Gardiner in that piece (BWV 233). But, the recordings by the Purcell Quartet and by Herreweghe are both excellent. >
oops, I read too fas.
wrong mass.
Sorry about that,

Drew (BWV 846-893) wrote (October 11, 2006):
If you are interested in getting all of Herreweghe's recordings of Bach's masses (for Virgin), Mass in b included, go to www.mdt.co.uk and look under November pre-releases . . .

http://www.mdt.co.uk/MDTSite/pages/product/product.asp?ctgry=NR_November06&prod=3728562

The five disc set is available for about 12 pounds or $23 (+ shipping).

 

The Masses 233-236

Bradley Lehman wrote (April 17, 2007):
< I enjoy Purcell Quartet's OVPP recordings of the Lutheran Masses (why don't more people record these wonderful works? the parody stigma lives on, I guess), but everytime I listen to them miss the "choral" element, and turn to Herreweghe's account. >
There's another fine new set of them, too, released 2006: all four of those Masses BWV 233-236 performed by Publick Musick (Boston) directed by Folan. It was recorded in 2004-5.

The choir membership (adult, mixed) is listed as 6, 5, 5, 6...which includes all six of the vocal soloists singing with the choir. 15 string players are credited, plus the winds and organ.

Info and a sample are here: http://www.musicaomnia.org/bachchoral.asp

I have the older Herreweghe recording too, bought a long time ago, and now I enjoy that one and Folan's about equally. Good to have both. One nice difference is that Folan's ensemble uses a more Germanic pronunciation of the Latin (with hard G sounds, etc). The recorded sound on Folan's seems crisper and better focused, too. If I have a complaint about the Herreweghe set, it's that the music seems almost too refined/gentle and therefore not so interesting! Next to that, Folan's is more vigorous.

I'll get the Purcell Quartet's set sometime, as I want to hear it with fewer singers too! :)

In the Brilliant Classics box I have the Dresden/Flamig rendition (1972) that I haven't got around to listening to yet; therefore no comment on that.

Dima Vinokurov wrote (April 17, 2007):
[To Bradley Lehman] Konrad Junghänel conducting Cantus Cölln has also recorded Messen BWV 233-236 and they are due to be released in the middle of May of 2007. Apparently this is OVPP recording in the spirit of their earlier recording of Messe h-moll BWV 232. Ton Koopman had included Messen BWV 233-236 in the last volume of his complete recording of cantatas, but I haven’t heard it yet.

Drew wrote (April 18, 2007):
[To Bradley Lehman] Thanks, Brad, for the tip.

I found even more sound samples of the Lutheran Masses on Publick Musick's website: http://www.publickmusick.org/Recordings/Missae_Breves.htm

Free shipping, too. Too bad I am not living in the US.

 

Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242: Details
Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements | General Discussions
Systematic Discussions:
BWV 233 | BWV 234 | BWV 235 | BWV 236 | BWV 233-236 | BWV 237-242

Recordings & Discussions of Other Vocal Works: Main Page | Motets BWV 225-231 | Mass in B minor BWV 232 | Missae Breves & Sanctus BWV 233-242 | Magnificat BWV 243 | Matthäus-Passion BWV 244 | Johannes-Passion BWV 245 | Lukas-Passion BWV 246 | Markus-Passion BWV 247 | Weihnachts-Oratorium BWV 248 | Oster-Oratorium BWV 249 | Chorales BWV 250-438 | Geistliche Lieder BWV 439-507 | AMN BWV 508-523 | Quodlibet BWV 524 | Aria BWV 1127

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Last update: ýJune 21, 2009 ý06:22:00