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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Cantata BWV 160
Ich weiß, daß mein Erloser lebt
Discussions

BWV 15, 141, 142 and 160

John Pike wrote (October 26, 2004):
A new recording by Wolfgang Helbich of more apocryphal Bach cantatas has been released on CPO 999 985-2. I see Aryeh has already got it on his website. Last year I was unable to get any complete recordings of BWV 15 or BWV 141. Although not by JS Bach, the music is, apparently, "not half bad" according to the review in BBC Music Magazine this month. George Pratt gives it 5* for sound and 4* for performance (out of 5 best). He comments "Not to be missed".

BWV 15 is copied from JS Bach's cousin Johann Ludwig Bach, BWV 141 (probably) and BWV 160 are by Telemann, and BWV 142 probably by Kuhnau.

Uri Golomb wrote (October 26, 2004):
John Pike wrote: < George Pratt gives it 5* for sound and 4* for performance (out of 5 best). He comments "Not to be missed". >
The only certainty is that BBC Music Magazine gave it 5* for sound and 4* for performance. As a Goldberg reviewer, I sometimes see the magazine changing my star ratings (always for the worse -- that is, publishing my review with one star less than what I gave). I'm not sure whether BBC MM's editors also find it appropriate to overrule their critics star-ratings. I would find it peculiar, at any rate, that a reviewer would give less than 5* to a recordings he finds "unmissable" -- though, in this case, the word might refer more to the repertoire than to the performance (and 4* is still pretty high).

Eric Bergerud wrote (October 27, 2004):
[To Uri Golomb] Years back before Newsday packed its New York baggage and retreated to Long Island I reviewed military history books for them. The book editor was a vet and I got to know him pretty well. As luck would have it I talked with him once about numerical rating systems whether the icons are numbers, little platters, rosettes or a little man sleeping-jumping up and down. He said such things, common among movie reviewers, weren't used by book reviews because, almost by definition, readers would read reviews. There was also an assumption that because so many more books are released than can possibly be reviewed that editors would try to review books worth reading as opposed finding books worth avoiding. (This wasn't true if something was controversial in the political or entertainment realm.) Anyway, although most reviewers considered themselves honor bound to find something wrong with anything reviewed now matter how good, it was pretty much a "thumbs up" business. The numerical rating stuff, he told me, was influenced by a quota system. If there were too many rosettes, or 5's or little men jumping in the air, the readers would find it impossible to recognize works of special merit. If there were too few, readers were also dissatisfied. In any case, suffer the poor movie maker that debuts a good film on the same week as two or three other good films. Likewise, if an okay film appears at the same time that a turkey flock comes to town, it's good news. Something similar could work with record reviews.

That said, I'm sure not knocking the Simon Crouch star system. Actually, I wish we had more such things. I find the cantata reviews in the archives very interesting (hope some can be revised in light of new recordings). However, I really like some guidance in which among 200+ cantatas and choral works that wise heads consider particularly worthy. I don't always agree with Crouch (6 isn't a 1*?) but I appreciate the effort and it's led to some good listening.

 

Discussions in the Week of June 27, 2010

William Hoffman wrote (June 27, 2010):
Cantata 160 (Telemann & Bach)

While Leipzig Cantor Johann Sebastian Bach, beginning in 1723, had pulled out all the stops for the Christmas Festival, in 1724 he curtailed his efforts for the church year three-day festivals of Easter and Pentecost. For Easter he had just finished presenting his first major Oratorio Passion according to St. John on Good Friday, as part of his annual duties. For Pentecost, the Thomas School term was ending with attendant, major administrative and teaching responsibilities for Bach.

The record shows that for the three-day Easter Festivals, Bach turned almost exclusively to existing compositions involving revivals, parodies, and those of his esteemed colleagues Johann Ludwig Bach (1677-1731) and Georg Philipp Telemann (1681-1767). Bach also would incorporate numerous cantatas of both in his succeeding church-year presentations. Further, in 1725, Bach ceased his composition of chorale cantatas for the remainder of his 1724-25 second cycle through Trinity Sunday. He began accumulating libretti and existing works of other composers in order to help satisfy his calling of a "well-regulated church music to the glory of God." During Bach's first hiatus from annual cantata cycle presentations in the early summer of 1725, three Telemann cantatas were presented for the Fourth though the Sixth Sundays After Trinity.

A review of the record suggests that Bach initially performed appropriate music on Easter Sunday in pairings of celebratory and intimate works, while for the remaining two days of Easter Monday and Tuesday, he used virtual parodies of Köthen serenades in the first cycle of 1724, created a new work and possibly two revivals in 1725, and presented two cantatas of his third cousin Johann Ludwig in 1726.
Beginning with the Easter season of 1727, Bach ceased composing church year cantatas, following his first performance of the demanding<St. Matthew Passion>, which would be enlarged for its second performance in 1729.

Bach's Perspective and Patterns

Bach apparently followed an established pattern of pairings on Easter Sunday, beginning in 1724. He presented two revivals of older Easter Sunday music, his intimate first church work, Chorale Cantata BWV 4, "Christ lag in Todesbanden" (Christ lies in death's bondage) from Mühlhausen (1707/08), and the Weimar 1715 celebratory Cantata BWV 31, "Der Himmel lacht! die Erde jubiliert" (The heavens laugh, the earth rejoices). Bach appears to have followed a similar pattern in 1725 with his festive parody Easter Oratorio, BWV 249, and possibly the intimate and extended Telemann Easter motet, "Der Herr ist König" (The Lord is King); TVWV 8:6. For Easter Sunday 1726, Bach presented the festive J.L. Bach Cantata, "Denn du wirst meine Seele nicht in der Hölle lassen" (For you will not leave my soul in hell), BWV 15 > Anh. 157=JLB21, and possibly the intimate Telemann Easter Cantata BWV 160 > Anh. III 157, Ich weiß, daß mein Erloser lebt (I know that my Redeemer lives).

A Telemann 1723 Easter Cantata, "So du mit deinem Munde bekennest Jesum" (If thou with thy mouth confess Jesus), TVWV 1:1350, may have been presented on Easter Sunday 1725 in lieu of a repeat of Cantata 4, or in a pairing with the Easter motet, "The Lord is King." Instead, Telemann's second Easter Sunday cantata connected to Bach may have been presented on Easter Tuesday 1725 when no record is found or there is the possibility of a pairing of the revival of Cantata BWV 4 and a revision of Weimar Purification Cantata BWV 158.

Documentation shows that a copy of the score and parts set of TVWV 1:1350 was owned by C.G. Meißner in Gotha, Bach Main Copyist B earlier in Leipzig, 1723-31. In addition, the incipit opening chorus, TVWV 1:1350/1, was found in an addendum to Bach's 1729 Easter Tuesday Cantata BWV 145 in the Picander Cycle, presented one day after the extant aria fragment set to a Picander text for Easter Monday, BWV Anh. 190 (P.29), "Ich bin ein Pilgrim auf der Welt" - both in the "lost" fourth annual cycle. These two works followed the second, definitive 1729 Good Friday performance of the St. Matthew Passion (BWV 244), with Picander libretto.

The J.L. Bach and Telemann Easter cantatas were originally attributed to Johann Sebastian, as Cantatas 15 and 160 respectively. The two cantatas and the Telemann motet are products of Bach's student copyists of the mid-1720s: Carl Heinrich Bach, Main Copyist C, for the score of "Cantata 15"; Heinrich Nicholas Gerber for "Cantata 160," and a collaboration of Bach's main cantata copyists, including Meißner, in the Telemann Easter motet. Gerber primarily copied out Bach keyboard works (1724-27), such as the Inventions and Sinfonias, French and English Suites, and parts of the Well-Tempered Clavier in the only surviving editions.

Bach-Telemann Connection

The Telemann Easter motet and Easter Cantata BWV 160 in particular are the initial products of a close relationship between the Hamburg and Leipzig music directors, who were responsible at that time for presenting church year cantatas and annual Passion Oratorio presentations in their respective communities' main churches. Two significant events involving positions in Weimar and Leipzig brought the two composers together in a shared destiny, as described in Richard Petzold's Telemann biography (English translation, 1974).

When Weimar Court Capellmeister Drese died on December 1, 1716 after a long illness, Duke Frederick of Saxe-Gotha "appears to have taken diplomatic steps amongst his relatives in Thuringa in order to lure Telemann to Gotha. He not only promised Telemann that he could continue as Capellmeister at Large (`von Haus aus') for the court at Eisenach but arranged with the Duke of Saxe-Weimar that now the vacant post of Capellmeister Johann Samuel Drese (that Drese had held from 1683) should be his (Telemann's) as well. This was the appointment that the court organist and leader of the orchestra, Johann Sebastian Bach, was counting on, without of course getting it. By these manoeuvers it was sought to give Telemann the musical overlordship of several Saxon and Thuringen Courts" (p.35), as well as retention at Frankfurt. Instead, Drese's son Johann Wilhelm, vice-Capellmeister since 1704, succeeded him while Bach ceased composing cantatas and a year later became Capellmeister at Köthen.

See BCW Telemann: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Telemann-Georg-Philipp.htm

Petzold suggests that Bach and Telemann had several common interests and concerns with the Leipzig Cantor's vacant position, 1722-23. Telemann, like Bach later, refused to take part in academic teaching, as he was exempted in Hamburg, although "each was qualified to lecture in Latin by virtue of a thorough humanistic grounding" (p.37). Also, Telemann stirred the ire of the Leipzig Town Council (July 17, 1722) by intending to perform operas "even outside the ordained market days," without the consent of the Council, Church, or Citizenry. Telemann was offered the post on August 11 but a personal visit to Leipzig in September failed to resolve the matter and in November, after gaining major improvements in his situation in Hamburg, Telemann declined the Leipzig appointment.

Petzold suggests that the leading contenders for the Leipzig position communicated with each other. "Although it is certain that Telemann wrote to and received letters from J.S. Bach, Johann Friedrich Fasch at Zerbst, Christoph Graupner at Darmstadt, and Gottfried Stözel in Gotha, none of these letters are known to survive" (p.62). Petzold also notes (p. 47) that Bach and Telemann struggled to present church music with limited funds from their employers. IMHO, it is possible that Bach and Telemann had an on-going correspondence about their mutual, respective predicaments and challenges and that Bach might have turned to Telemann to provide cantatas during crises, music that would have been well-received in Leipzig. We know from the BCW record that Bach was involved in various Telemann cantatas and Passions, as well as instrumental music.

It was Alfred Dürr in 1950 who authenticated eight cantatas formerly attributed to Bach as works of Telemann, in "Zur Echteit einiger Bach zugeschriebener Kantaten," Bach Jauhbuch 45 (1951/52, 35-46).
They are BWV 141 (Advent 3), 160 (Easter Sunday), 218 (Pentecost), 219 (St. Michael) and 145/2 (Easter), as well as BWV Anh. 1 (Trinity +7), 156 (Annunciation), and 157 (purification). Many of the works appeared in Leipzig publisher Breitkopf's catlogs, beginning in 1761, sometimes attributed "di Bachi." The apocryphal works came most likely from various Leipzig sources, including Bach's musical library with extraneous compositions that were never shelved with Bach's church works, from the University Church, and the Leipzig Collegium musicum, as well as Bach students and the estates of local musicians.

Telemann Easter Motet

Telemann's Easter Motet, "Der Herr ist König" (The Lord is King), TVWV 8:6, is a substantial work of 22 minutes, resembling a cantata in its eight varied movements, in mixed stile or "stile misto." It is one of 16 works classified as motets in Werner Menke's <Telemann Vokal Werke Verzeichnis> catalog (1982-83). Two are in Latin, several for double chorus and two for vocal soloists; the 14 in German use mostly standard biblical references (often psalmic) or chorale verses, and are for special occasions, primarily memorials , occasionally for feasts of Christmas, Reformation, and Easter.

The development of the German motet in the early 1700s is best in Johann Ludwig Bach's 11 motets. As Daniel Melamed observes in the forward (p. ix) to the A-R Editions (2001): "The use of free poetic texts in place of well-known hymn stanzas, the introduction of dialogue texts, and the musical independence of the aria sections (some in two-part texture) from the biblical portions represent expansions of the resources of the traditional central-German motet, largely under the influence of the church cantata. The use of a strophic aria text was increasingly common . . . ."

There is another example of a Telemann's motet being connected to Bach. Telemann Motet TVWV 8:10, "Jauchzet dem Herrn alle Welt" is part of a Christmas pasticcio motet assembled at the Thomas School just after Bach's death in 1750. It is the same music as BWV Anh. 160/1, opening double chorus which may have originated as the incipit of a lost Telemann cantata TVWV 1:952. The second movement is a four-part chorale-chorus, "Sei Lob und Preis mit Ehren," a parody of the same music in the second movement of Bach's Cantata BWV 28 for the Sunday After Christmas 1725. The third movement is a four-part chorus, "Amen, Lob und Ehre," Adagio and Vivace, from Telemann's cantata "Lobt Gott, ihr Christen allzugleich," TVWV 1:1066/4. The four-voice second and third movements were published as Bach's Motet, BWV 231, in the Bach Gesellschaft motet volume XXXIX, 167 (F. Wüllner, 1992).

Easter Sunday, "Der Herr ist König" (The Lord is King); Telemann motet, TVWV8:6
?4/1/1725, ?after sermon
Sources: (2) score copy from parts (Kopping, J.A. Kuhnau, Meißner, JSB), (2) parts (Dresden cantor Siebold, 1752-68, Dresden Bib. 2392)
Literature: BJ 1991, Beißwinger, Bachs Eingriffe in Werke fremder Komponisten Beobachtungen an den Notenschrift aus seiner Bibliotek (Bach's Involvement in Extraneous Work Compositions Involving Musical Manuscripts from His Library); Recording (Capriccio CD 10556, Hermann Max, movement timings below)
BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Telemann-Cantata-TWV8-6.htm
Text: Bible
Scoring: STB, 4 vv, 2 vn., bc
Movements: 3 choruses, 3 arias, 2 recits.
No. 1, Chorus, 'Der Herr ist Konig' 1:51 Psalm 93:1, 87:2; Isaiah 33:22
No. 2 ,T Aria'Mein Jesu, Konig, Herr und Freund' 3:39
No. 3, Recit. 'So groß ist Christi Reich' 1:00
No. 4, S Aria, 'Zion liegt zu deinen Fußen' 4:38
No. 5, Chorus 'Die Tochter Zion sind frohlich' 2:04
No. 6, B Aria, 'Prahlet, ihr Volker' 4:23
No. 7, Recit. 'Dies Wunderreich ist' 0:51
No. 8, 'Chorus, Der Herr ist Gott' 3:28

"Der Herr ist König" was originally listed as a four-part a-capella motet in the TVWV catalog with the source manuscript in a motet omnibus collection in the Berlin SPK, and published by Hänssler in 1967, edited by Menke, with the incipit as a fugue. In 1725, Bach's principal cantata copyists assembled the score from parts for soprano, tenor and bass soloists, chorus, two violins and basso continuo, says Kirsten Beißwinger, "Bachs Eingriffe in Werke fremder Komponisten Beobachtungen an den Notenschrift aus seiner Bibliotek" (Bach's Involvement in Extraneous Work Compositions Involving Musical Manuscripts from His Library), <Bach Jahrbuch> 1991, pp. 144-146. Main copyist was Johann Christian Kopping (originally Anon. Id); others were Johann Andreas Kuhnau (Main Copyist A), Christian Gottlob Meißner (Main Copyist B), and Anonymous Copyist Id, with Bach making insertions and corrections.

Andreas Glöckner also dates the Telemann Easter Motet to 1725 in his "Observations on the Leipzig Cantata Performances for the Fourth to the Sixth Sunday After Trinity" <Bach Jahrbuch> 1992, pp. 73-76, June 24 to July 8, 1725. The BCW Telemann listing above has the following Telemann cantatas:
1. Cantata Gelobet sei der Herr, der Gott Israel), for Feast of St John or 4th Sunday after Trinity, TVWV 1:596 (Text: Erdmann Neumeister - performed by J.S Bach in Leipzig on June 24, 1725;
2. Cantata Der Segen des Herrn machet reich ohne Muhe, for 5th Sunday after Trinity, TVWV 1:310 (Text: Erdmann Neumeister) - performed by J.S Bach in Leipzig on July 1, 1725;
3. Cantata Wer sich rachet, an dem wird sich der Herr wider rachen, for 6th Sunday after Trinity, TVWV 1:1600 (Text: Erdmann Neumeister) - performed by J.S Bach in Leipzig on July 8, 1725.

A church cantata libretto book for that time period exists, detailed by Wolf Hobohm in "Neue `Texte zur Leipziger Kirchenmusik'," <Bach Jahrbuch> 1973, pp. 5-32. The three works and their dates are listed, as well as German Magnificat, "Meine Seele erhebt den Herrn" (Luther translation), BWV Anh. 21, for the Feast of the Visitation," July 2, a work now attributed to Georg Melchior Hoffman (1679-1715). The word-book and the score of BWV Anh. 21, are located in the Warsaw University Library. Also attributed to Hoffmann is a German Magnficat anonymous paraphrase, "Meine Seele rühmt und preist," BWV 189, a solo tenor cantata also formerly attributed to Bach.

It is possible that Bach was on vacation in the early summer of 1725 and entrusted the performances to his Prefect (Assistant). Bach would have been following a tradition that Capellmeister Telemann particularly exercised in 1718 in Frankfurt when he left his assistant, Johann Christoph Bodinus, to present service cantatas (such as the five J.L. Bach works) while he was on trips to Gotha and Eisenach.

Telemann Easter Cantata

Cantata BWV 160 > Anh. III 157, Ich weiß, daß mein Erloser lebt (I know that my Redeemer lives)
Georg Philipp Telemann, TVWV 1:877, (1) Brussels Conserv. (2) score copy Gerber lost (W.Rust)
Works Catalog: BGA II: 171 (Ernst Naumann 1886)
Text: Erdmann Neumeister (Weißenfels 1700)
Literature: Spitta I:501-04 & FN20, Schmieder BWV 1950:213, Mencke TVWV (Frankfurt 1982/83), v.1; Whittaker I:70-74
BCW Score: Vocal & Piano [0.76 MB] (Kalmus K09323, Drinker transl.) | Score BGA [1.11 MB] (Eulenberg BWV155-160, 1965)
BCW Telemann: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Telemann-Georg-Philipp.htm
BCW Cantata 160: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV160.htm
Scoring: T, vn., bn., bc
Movements: 3 arias, 2 recitatives
1. Aria (dc): Ich weiss, dass mein Erloser lebt, Allegro (I know that my Redeemer lives) (Job 19:25)
2. Recitative: Er lebt und ist von Toten auferstanden! (He lives and is from death arisen)
3. Aria (dc): Gott Lob! Dass mein Erloser lebt, Allegro moderato (God praise, my redeemer lives)
4. Recitative: So biet ich allen Teufeln Trutz (So bid I all devils defiance)
5. Aria: Nun, ich halte mich bereit, Vivace (Now I hold myself ready)

"JSB Apocryphal Cantatas," Cantata 160, Peter Wollny (transl. Susan Marie Praeder)< CPO CD 999-985, Helbich:
The Easter Cantata "Ich weiß, daß mein Erloser lebt" BWV 160 found its way into the old Bach-Gesamtausgabe on the basis of a now-lost copy by the Bach pupil Heinrich Nikolaus Gerber (1702-75). Philipp Spitta still regarded the work as genuine, even dedicating an enthusiastic commentary of fewer than four pagesto what he held to be an early composition and evaluating it as a "successful attempt" of the young Bach "to gain a firm foothold in the forms of the newer sacred cantata." Arnold Schering again expressed initial doubts about its authenticity (BJb 1938, "Musik für die Leipziger Universitätsgottesdienst" 62-86), and since then two copies with an ascription to Georg Philipp Telemann have come to light. The musical findings also speak in favor of an attribution to Telemann. The poetic text is from an annual cycle written by the theologian Erdmann Neumeister for the Weißenfels court in 1700. Telemann evidently set the cycle two times, once for a cantata for large ensemble of soloists, choir and orchestra and once merely with an accompaniment consisting of a violin and basso continuo. This latter version was contained in Gerber's copy. It recalls Telemann's similar instrumented cantatas from a cycle published in 1725 as "Der Harmonische Gottesdienst" and in many a respect is typical of this composer's light and pleasant tone."

Telemann's Prodigious Output," 1/16/06 Thomas Braatz BCW Telemann & Bach: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Other/Telemann-Gen1.htm:
"The post-sermon cantatas for 1725-6 appeared as Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst (fig.2). This cycle's limited scoring (voice, melody instrument and continuo) and restricted scope (two da capo arias separated by a recitative) made it suitable for churches with small musical establishments and for domestic worship;" "Printed series of cantatas: Harmonischer Gottes-Dienst, oder Geistliche Cantaten zum allgemeinen Gebrauche, 1v, 1 inst, bc (Hamburg, 1725-6); T ii-v [1725-6)"

Gerber's handwritten-score, the source for the BGA edition, was in the possession of BGA editor Wilhelm Rust (1886) but is now lost. Meanwhile, a manuscript dating no later than 1750 was found in the Royal Brussels Conservatory. It is labeled as an Easter Cantata by Telemann. Similarly-scored Telemann cantatas are found in various places, including the Brussels and Berlin libraries, with texts from Neumeister's 1700 sacred text collection. Currently, the only Telemann cantata score in Bach's handwriting is "Machet die Tore weit," TVWV 1:1074, for the First Sunday in Advent, inaugurating Bach's so-called Christological Cycle of 1734-35 involving oratorios and cantata reperformances, including new chorale cantatas, BWV 9 and BWV 14 (per omnes versus), as well as, possibly, the first of four Gospel Passions in sequence, BWV 244-47.

The two most extensive commentaries on Cantata BWV 160 - Spitta and Whittaker were written before their attribution was changed. Spitta says, "the whole composition exhibits that union of tender sentiment and fresh vitality" that Spitta also found in Cantata BWV 18 of 1713. Following the opening aria of "sustained character, " he says Neumeister "had supplied very suitable words for the succeeding recitative once more briefly recurred to all the history of the Passion of our Lord from the beginning till the resurrection, in phrases of admirable significance and brevity, indicating at the same time the reverent piety of the Christian soul." Spitta continues to describe the remaining movements in equally lofty, perhaps hyperbolic eloquence.

Whittaker offers a different perspective, saying, "The qualities of the cantata fall below the standard of its fellows. There is a facile tunefulness and placid contentment about it, but in never ventures to soar." He calls the long initial recitative "a dry, monstrously Brobdingnagian sentence of 122 words, utterly out of proportion with regard to the cantata as a whole." Whittaker also faults the instrumental scoring, noting that the bassoon line is the same as the basso continuo and that it is silent when the violin is silent. Whittaker speculates, "It may possibly be by another hand, touched up by Bach."

Both Spitta and Whittaker judged the Telemann work in the context of a Bach piece, by Bach's inherent standards -- Spitta with unbridled enthusiasm and a too-generous spirit, Whittaker with disdain for a piece that doesn't measure up to inherent Bacchian standards. IMHO a better assessment lies in between. Listening to the recordings, there are tasteful and tasty phrases, especially with effective rhythmic accents. It is a generally concise, 12-minute work, the second movement recitative excepted. Telemann has skillfully realized Neumeister's sacred poetry, with occasional repetition of exordium (proclaiming words) and his concluding non-da capo aria in tripartite form is engaging, especially in the complimentary solo violin phrases and contrasting continuo support. Brevity and direct appeal are the hallmarks of Telemann's Easter Cantata.

While Bach continually labored to find effective libretti and competent musicians, there were times when he turned to the compositions of his colleagues, especially for church-year main services. These works are part of his production, his legacy. IMHO, we are only now beginning to realize the greater perspective of Bach's art and craft, of his desires and motives that are always inseparable. These works should not detract from our estimation and celebration of his place. They are much more than pearls (artificial or real, deformed or otherwise) cast before swine. They are a silent, tacit mutual collaboration of music-making and service done to the glory of God, which he even inscribed on some of these works.


Bibliography

Alfred Dürr, "Heinrich Nicholas Gerber als Schüler Bachs, Bach Jauhruch 64 (1978), 7-18. JLB-25, Trinity +25 (?November 18, 1725, copyist H.N. Gerber)

Conrad Bund: "Johann Ludwig Bach und die Franfurter Kapellmusik in der Zeit Georg Philipp Telemann," <Bach Jahrbuch lxx> (1984), 117-29.

Alfred Dürr, "Zur Echteit einiger Bach zugeschriebener Kantaten," Bach Jahbuch 45 (1951/52, 35ff).

William Hoffman wrote (July 3, 2010):
Cantata 160: Der Herr ist König

Text: Bible (1, 5); chorale (9), Luther Ein feste Berg" (S.2)
Scoring: STB, 4 vv, 2 vn., bc (orig, expanded to tp, timp, 2 obs. d'a, bn, str., bc)
Movements: 3 choruses, 3 arias, 2 recits.
No. 1, Chorus, 'Der Herr ist Konig' 1:51 (Psalm 97:1)
No. 2, B Aria, 'Mein Jesu, Konig, Herr und Freund' 3:39 (dc)
No. 3, T Recit., 'So groß ist Christi Reich' 1:00
No. 4, S Aria, 'Zion liegt zu deinen Fußen' 4:38 (dc)
No. 5, Chorus, 'Die Tochter Zion sind frohlich' 2:04 (after 97:8-9)
No. 6, T Aria, 'Prahlet, ihr Volker' 4:23 (dc, gavotte)
No. 7, S Recit., 'Dies Wunderreich ist' 0:51
No. 8, B. Aria, "Der Herr ist Gott' 3:28 (dc)
No. 9, Chorale, 'Mit unsre macht' 1:02

Hermann Maxx has a 1995 Capriccio CD 10556, which is a full account of Telemann's Motet, TVWV 8:6, with notes by Carsten Lange, English translation Lionel Salter. It is an expanded account for full orchestra in the tutti choral passages, instruments doubling vocal parts; and the pairing of trumpet and violin, two violins, and two oboes d'amore in the da capo arias.

"It can no longer be exactly determined on what occassion Bach performed the work," says the notes. With the addition of the closing chorale, the work could be for Reformation Day, especially whenthe text from the unknown librettist references Revelation 14:6-8, the "eternal gospel": "Fear God and give him Glory," found Mvt. 3, 1, and 5. It is also possible that biblical references of praise and thanks to God in the bass (No. 2) and soprano (No. 4) aria would be appropriate for the annual Installation of the Leipzig Town Council, says the notes.

Although the work is laid out in the recording as a symmetrical (palindrome) cantata, it is classified as a motet by virture of its opening and middle fugal choruses set to to psalmic texts as well as its celebratory character for festivals. Based upon the dated activities of the handwriting of Bach's three copyists as well as the watermarks, the work is dated between 11 June 1724 and 6 May 1725, during Bach's second cycle. While the work previously had been designated for the Easter festival, it is possible that Bach presented it for the oiwn Council in August or Reformation Day, October 31, 1724, since no Bach cantata has been fully documented for either date.

Ed Myskowski wrote (July 3, 2010):
William Hoffman wrote:
< "It can no longer be exactly determined on what occassion Bach performed >the work," says the notes. >
I am guessing that is a translation (from German?) with ambiguity in the verb tenses and/or time frame?

WH (citing CD notes):
< With the addition of the closing chorale, the work could be for Reformation Day, especially when the text from the unknown librettist references Revelation 14:6-8, the "eternal gospel": "Fear God and give him Glory," found Mvt. 3, 1, and 5. It is also possible that biblical references of praise and thanks to God in the bass (No. 2) and soprano (No. 4) aria would be appropriate for the annual Installation of the Leipzig Town Council, says the notes. >
EM
A few years ago we had extensive discussion, re the origins and chronology of what have come down to us as BWV 79 and BWV 80, cantatas for Reformation Day, with roots in Bach’s first years in Leipzig.

I have had a lapse in relating to the significance of Reformation Day for Bach in 18th C. Leipzig, until this very moment, as we celebrate Independence Day in 21st C. USA. You have to be there to understand.

Given the intensity of work on other cantatas, especially BWV 80, I find it difficult to interpolate BWV 160 into this context:

WH:
< Based upon the dated activities of the handwriting of Bach's three copyists as well as the watermarks, the work is dated between 11 June 1724 and 6 May 1725, during Bach's second cycle. While the work previously had been designated for the Easter festival, it is possible that Bach presented it for the town Council in August or Reformation Day, October 31, 1724, since no Bach cantata has been fully documented for either date. >
EM:
I have a glimmer of the significance of Reformation Day for Bach in Leipzig. Happy Independence Day to all you 21st C. believers. Non-believers welcome.

 

Cantata BWV 160: Recordings | Discussions | Discussions of Non-Bach Cantatas: Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

Georg Philipp Telemann: Short Biography | G.P. Telemann - Use of Chorale Melodies in his works | G.P. Telemann - His Autobiography (Hamburg, 1740) | Georg Philipp Telemann & Bach
Cantata BWV 141 | Cantata BWV 160 | Cantata BWV 218 | Cantata BWV 219 | Passions-Pasticcio BWV 1088 | Motet Jauchzet dem Herrn, alle Welt, BWV Anh 160 | Cantata Hier ist mein Herz, geliebter Jesu, TWV 1:795 | Cantata Ich freue mich im Herren, TWV 1:826 | Cantata Machet die Tore weit (I), TWV 1:074 | Cantata Der Herr ist König, TWV 8:6 | Brockes Passion, TWV 5:1 | Passions-Oratorium Seliges Erwägen, TWV 5:2 | Music

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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Last update: ýJuly 10, 2010 ý23:59:42