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Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

Cantata BWV 94
Was frag ich nach der Welt
Discussions - Part 3

Continue from Part 2

Discussions in the Week of September 25, 2011 (3rd round)

Francis Browne wrote (September 24, 2011):
BWV 94: notes on the text

BWV 94, Was frag ich nach der Welt, was first performed on 6th August 1724 and is one of the many chorale cantatas which Bach included in his second yearly cycle in Leipzig. These cantatas are based on a single chorale : the first and last verses are set unaltered, while the intervening verses may be treated variously. The cantata was revived in 1732-35 and again performed by Bachís successor after his death in 1750s.

The connection of the cantata text with the readings for the 9th Sunday after Trinity is tenuous. The epistle warns against idolatry and in some of the gospel there is an antithesis between worldly values and Jesus.

BWV 94 is based on a hymn by Balthasar Kindermann published in 1664. It has been often ascribed to Georg Michael Pfefferkorn but the general consensus today is that Kindermann is the author. The phrase Was frag ich nach der Welt is repeated insistently throughout the hymn in a way that suggests it may have been familiar and proverbial for the original audience. The exact words do not seem to be used in the bible. Some eighteenth century hymn books include this chorale in sections dealing with the vanity of the world and for this theme quote Psalm 73:25-6
Wenn ich nur dich habe, so frage ich nichts nach Himmel und Erde. Wenn mir gleich Leib und Seele verschmachtet, so bist du doch, GOtt, allezeit meines Herzens Trost und mein Teil.

Other hymn books give 1 John 2:15 as reference for this theme:
Habt nicht lieb die Welt, noch was in der Welt ist. So jemand die Welt liebhat, in dem ist nicht die Liebe des Vaters. Denn alles, was in der Welt ist (nämlich des Fleisches Lust und der Augen Lust und hoffärtiges Leben), ist nicht vom Vater, sondern von der Welt.
Und die Welt vergehet mit ihrer Lust; wer aber den Willen GOttes tut, der bleibet in Ewigkeit.

But the vanity of the world was a common topic in Baroque poetry . Andreas Gryphius (1616-1664), arguably the most impressive German poet of the seventeenth century, uses the phrase in a striking poem Verleugnung der Welt which is often included in anthologies. Verleugnung der Welt (Zeno.org)

The first stanza is :
Was frag ich nach der welt! sie wird in flammen stehn:
Was acht ich reiche pracht: der Todt reißt alles hin!
Was hilfft die wissenschafft/ der mehr denn falsche dunst?
Der liebe Zauberwerck ist tolle Phantasie:
Die wollust ist fürwar nichts alß ein schneller Traum;
Die Schönheit ist wie Schnee'/ diß Leben ist der Todt.

The poem is a sestina where the repetition of the same end words throughout helps to build up a powerful treatment of the world's vanity In contrast to Kindermannís hymn, the positive promises of Christianity are hardly mentioned .The phrase Was frag ich nach der welt is also used by Friedrich von Logau (1605-55), a slightly older contemporaryof Gryphius (Sinngedichte, 20.Am Sontage Quinquages).

To come much closer to Bach, Christiane Mariane von Ziegler (1695-1760) uses the phrase in her Versuch in gebundener Schreib-Art (1728). Fer. 2. Pentec . Bach used this book for the texts of nine cantatas.

Perhaps the phrase was proverbial, perhaps it was given currency by Gryphius. Whatever its origin Kindermann uses these words eleven times in his hymn. Three of the stanzas taken over unaltered by Bachís librettist begin and end with the phrase.

A comparison of the text of the bass aria second movement with the second stanza of the hymn shows the librettist at work : Rauch becomes Rauch und Schatten; vergehet becomes verschwindet und vergeht. The image of Christ as a starker Fels is changed to the abstract Zuversicht. The expansion of the chorale by added recitative in the third and fifth movements of the cantata confirms this tendency to verbosity and abstraction. The mention of hocherhaben Leuten is expanded in a much longer description of such people that draws upon what Christ said when questioned about John the Baptist (Luke 7 :25) and the story of the Tower of Babel. In general Bachís librettist places greater emphasis on devotion to Christ as a substitute or antidote for obsession with worldly things.

The sixth stanza of the hymn provides the starting point for the text of arias for tenor and soprano. Here the librettist expands the chorale with more forceful negative diction , striking imagery (Kot, Maulwurf) and greater emphasis on the rejection of worldly values (Mir ekelt von der Erden).

Some commentators have felt that Bachís music is in places inappropriately cheerful and positive for a rejection of life in this world. Perhaps a key to understanding the texts of the chorale and cantata and how Bach has set them is to note how what can seem to us a negative attitude of rejection is outweighed by devotion to Jesus and the promise of eternal happiness.

Ed Myskowski wrote (September 25, 2011):
Introduction to BWV 94 -- Was frag ich nach der Welt

Weekly reminder:

This week we continue Trinity season cantatas with BWV 94, the second of three works for the 9th Sunday after Trinity.

Details of text, commentary, recordings, and previous discussion are accessible via: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/BWV94.htm

The link to commentary by Julian [Mincham] is especially recommended as an introduction to listening.

The BWV 94 page also has convenient access to notes from the Koopman [4] (notes by Christoph Wolff) CD issue, via link beneath the cover photo.

The Gardiner CD [7] needs special mention. The works for Trinity 9 are one of four actual pilgrimage recordings which were released by DG Archiv, rather than on Gardinerís own SDG label. The others are for Trinity 11, Epiphany 3, and the Purification. Notes by Gardiner are not included, so there is no BCW link this week.

The chorale text and melody are also accessible via links at the BWV 94 page. Francis Browne is adding new commentary on the cantata texts to his interlinear translations, linked via [English-3I].

Ed Myskowski wrote (September 25, 2011):
Ed Myskowski wrote:
< The Gardiner CD [7] needs special mention. The works for Trinity 9 are one of four actual pilgrimage recordings which were released by DG Archiv, rather than on Gardinerís own SDG label. The others are for Trinity 11, Epiphany 3, and the Purification. Notes by Gardiner are not included, so there is no BCW link this week. >
Peter Smaill wrote in July of 2006:

<John Eliot Gardiner, in his programme notes to the 1999 recording [7], ponders the question as to whether any specific plutocratic individual was intended by the text of the Recitative BWV 94/3, which translates as follows:

ďA proud man builds the most splendid palaces,
He seeks the highest post of honour,
He clothes himself of the best
in purple, gold, in silver, fine linen and velvet.Ē> (end quote)

The recording date is August 2000, from the pilgrimage concert series, although DG Archive also repackaged earlier studio recordings ranging from about 1993 to 1999 for release as part of the same series.

The question is interesting, but I believe it was posed by Ruth Tatlow, who signed the CD booklet notes, rather than by JEGardiner himself, although perhaps she got the idea from JEG?

Ed Myskowski wrote (September 25, 2011):
Francis Browne wrote:
< The coof the cantata text with the readings for the ninth Sunday after Trinity is tenuous. >
There is a perceptive comment in the BCW discussion archives (p. 1, from Roy Reed, I believe), to the effect that the cantata text in fact misunderstands or misrepresents the point of the scriptural parable for the day.

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 26, 2011):
Four Rules for Parables

Ed Myskowski wrote:
< There is a perceptive comment in the BCW discussion archives (p. 1, from Roy Reed, I believe), to the effect that the cantata text in fact misunderstands or misrepresents the point of the scriptural parable for the day. >
The New Testament parables are full of scholarly problems of transmission, often so great as to be incomprehensible to modern interpretation. A scholar once provided an EE-ZEE guide to the parables as a literary form for non-specialist readers:

Four Rules for Parables

The parable is about the first person named, not necessarily the most prominent character. Example: the Parable of the Prodigal Son is about the Generous Father.

The first person named is usually God.

Jesus makes a cameo appearance as a lesser figure or a servant.

Images from nature are used to represent the People of God.

Julian Mincham wrote (September 26, 2011):
[To Douglas Cowling] Douglas I am a bit lost on this. Is it possible to give examples for all four of the 'rules'?

Douglas Cowling wrote (September 26, 2011):
Julian Mincham wrote:
< Douglas I am a bit lost on this. Is it possible to give examples for all four of the 'rules'? >
Two well-known examples:

1) The Parable of the Mustard Seed"

"The Kingdom of Heaven is like a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field; which indeed is smaller than all seeds. But when it is grown, it is greater than the herbs, and becomes a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in its branches."

1. The sower is the most important (and only) character.
2. God is the sower.
3. Jesus does not appear.
4. The People of God/The Church are seeds and plants

2) The Parable of the Leaven

"And again he said, Whereunto shall I liken the kingdom of God? It is like leaven, which a woman took and hid in three measures of meal, till the whole was leavened."

1. The woman is the most important (and only) character.
2. God is the woman.
3. Jesus does not appear.
4. The People of God/The Church are leaven in the loaf.

The formula is not a Dan-Brown key, but a rather helpful aide to deconstructing some of the densest passges in the Christian scriptures.

David McKay wrote (September 26, 2011):
I've appreciated William Barclay, Simon Kistemaker and Craig Blomberg's comments on Jesus' parables. Those four rules seem too simplistic to me. The current article in Wikipedia is not a bad intro. Whatever the path of transmission of the parables may have been, I think there is much to appreciate and reflect on in the parables in the form in which we have them.


Have to confess that none of the cantatas on the parables are on my radar yet, but I hope I may correct that before too long.

Ed Myskowski wrote (September 26, 2011):
David McKay wrote:
< Whatever the path of transmission of the parables may have been, I think there is much to >appreciate and reflect on in the parables in the form in which we have them.
Have to confess that none of the cantatas on the parables are on my radar yet, but I hope I may >correct that before too long. >
The parable of the dishonest steward (Luke 16: 1-9) relevant to the works for Trinity 9 including this weeks cantata discussion topic, BWV 94, remains paricularly inscrutable with respect to mammon. I am continuing to reflect. I think Doug has raised an important consideration: uncertainties of transmission (and/or translation?) may well be a factor in the difficulty of relating this specific parable to the assumed message regarding mammon.

William Hoffmann wrote (September 26, 2011):
Introduction to BWV 94 Trinity 9 Chorales

See: Motets & Chorales for 9th Sunday after Trinity

Ed Myskowski wrote (September 28, 2011):
Douglas Cowling wrote:
< Four Rules for Parables
The parable is about the first person named, not necessarily the most prominent character. Example: the Parable of the Prodigal Son is about the Generous Father. >
Here is a possible interpretation of Luke 16: 1-9, interspersed with Dougs original post:

DC:
< The first person named is usually God. >
EM:
The first person named is the rich man, who had a steward

DC:
< Jesus makes a cameo appearance as a lesser figure or a servant. >
EM:
The steward?

DC:
< Images from nature are used to represent the People of God. >
EM:
Luke 16: 8-9 has such images, wheat and oil (presumably olive, not unrefined petrol!?), as well as two distinct classes of people. The attitude toward these people is less clear, perhaps at this point difficulties with transmission or translation enter?

The most contradictory point: in verse 2 the steward is being dismissed, while in verse 8 he is commended for his shrewdness in dealing with (presumably) people of the world, as contrasted with (presumably) People of God.

In Luther and King James translations (available via BCW links for Gospel and Epistle readings), or the more recent RSV, mammon is specifically described as unrighteous . This is the emphasis, as well, in the Bach texts created for all three cantatas for Trinity 9, including BWV 94. Is the adjective applied to mammon justified by the events of the parable, or is it simply a convention?

In fact, a reasonable interpretation is that the master is indifferent to mammon, wealth, itself. What he condemns as doomed to failure is the spiritual reliance on mammon by the people of the world. Although not so clearly and directly stated, this seems consistent with other scriptural references, for example:

<Render therefore to Caesar the things which are Caesars, and to God the things that are Gods> Matthew 22:21

<For the love of money [not money itself] is the root of all evils>. 1 Timonthy 6:10

The events of the parable are not relevant to Bachs cantata texts, they share only the reference to mammon in common.

William Hoffmann wrote (October 6, 2011):
Cantata 94: Tonal Allegory & Perfect Penzel

Tonal Allegory in BWV 94

The following is a summary of Eric Chafe's comments on Cantata BWV 94, "Was frag ich nach der Welt" (What do I ask from the world) [Francis Browne BCW English translation], <Tonal Allegory in the Music of JSB (University of California Press, 1991: 179-81)

"A paradox that is typical of Bach's work in general is the cantata that urges rejection of the world in the most worldly terms. A perfect example of this is Cantata 94 . . . :" "a lengthy work in which the full instrumental resources, from the flute down to the basso continuo, participate in a sound spectrum of dance and concerto-like movements to give the most varied picture of the world in both its splendid and false aspects."

This antithesis is emphasized in the first five movements:

1. The opening chorale fantasia in D Major with its "tremendously ascending line for unaccompanied flute" and the soprano chorale, and

2. The bass continuo aria in the relative B Minor, "Die Welt ist wie ein Rauch und Schatten" (The world is like smoke or shadows) in which "the fallen character of the world is represented by an opening arpeggio descent in the basso continuo that constitutes the theme for the piece."

3. G Major Chorale arioso in 3/8, "Die Welt sucht Ehr und Ruhm/ Bei hocherhabnen Leuten" (The world seeks honour and glory/ among people of high rank) with tenor recitative trope in 4/4, "Ein Stolzer baut die prächtigsten Paläste" (A proud man builds most splendid palaces) with extensive modulations downward to C Major and C Minor);

4. The "tortured alto da-capo aria in E Minor, "Betörte Welt, betörte Welt!/ Auch dein Reichtum, Gut und Geld/ Ist Betrug und falscher Schein" (Deluded world, deluded world!/ Even your riches, wealth and cold/ adeception and false appearance), with its theological antithesis in the middle B section, Jesus, "Jesus soll allein/ Meiner Seele Reichtum sein" (Jesus, Jesus alone/ will be the wealth of my soul), and

5. G Major to D Major Chorale < Die Welt bekümmert sich> (The world is trouble) with bass recitative trope <Was muss doch wohl der Kummer sein?> (But what must this trouble be?), with "a deeper understanding of the world redeemed by Jesus' sacrifice."

Cantata 94 is a descent/ascent type of tonal allegory in the first five movements that "constitute the expression of understanding" involving Luther's "pivot of faith" between Old and New Testament teachings embedded in these five movements, particularly in the tenor and bass recitative tropes, because of "the length of the chorale text, and its perjorative characterization of the world."

"Bach needed to devise a structure to represent both the splendor of the world but that does not cancel out its enticements," says Chafe. Thus, the last three movements contain, respectively:

6. Tenor da-capo gigue-style (12/8) aria as a reminder of "Die Welt kann ihre Lust und Freud" (The world's pleasure and joy);

7. Bass bouree-style (4/4) da-capo aria as "a further warning," "Er halt es mit der blinden Welt,/ Wer nichts auf seine Seele halt" (Let him keep to the blind world/ who takes no care for his soul); and

8. Closing plain chorale (Stanzas 7 & 8) as "a statement of the promise of eternity for those who can resist the world," "Mein Jesus ist mein Leben,/ Mein Schatz, mein Eigentum" (My Jesus is my life/ my treasure, my property).

The final three movements complete the ambitius (circle of fifths) of D Major in a pattern of thirds -- A, F-Sharp and D Major, a "device (that) was possibly intended, like the instrumental and dance styles, to represent a comprehensive presentation of all the facets of worldly life," Chafe suggests.

"Neither here nor in any of the many other similar instances in his work can Bach be considered to reject his own music as too worldly," Chafe concludes. "Nor is it sufficient to say that Bach held (or rejected) the theological view that the world, while fallen, can nevertheless be enjoyed to the full as long as its finite, devalued nature is understood. This view simply separates the composer's religious beliefs from his art (without knowing that this is correct), eliminates the possibility that the composer might have thought deeply about the question himself, and adds nothing to our understanding of his allegorical procedures per se."

Perfect Penzel: Reception History

In his new "Notes on the text," Francis Browne examines the baroque usage of the phrase, "Was frag ich nach der Welt" (What do I ask from the world), BCW: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Texts/BWV94-Eng3.htm. He also writes that Cantata 94 "was revived in 1735 and again performed by Bach's successor after his death in 1750s." This relates to a fascinating chapter in the immediate reception history of Bach's service works in the decade following his death in 1750.

One of Bach's last students, Christian Friedrich Penzel (1737-1801), apparently began presenting Bach's chorale cantatas in Leipzig in the summer and fall of 1755, as the Thomas Choir's Perfect, in the interim following the unexpected death of Bach's brief successor, Johann Gottlob Harrer (b.1703) and the extended succession and tenure of Johann Friedrich Doles (1715-1797). Short BCW biography of Penzel: http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Lib/Penzel-Christian-Friedrich.htm

Harrer died on July 9, 1755, and Penzel as chorus perfect "filled in as director of the choruses until the official assumption of the Cantor's post by J.F. Doles," says Alfred Dürr in <Die Musik in Geschichte und Gegenwart (MGG)> (Music in History and the Present, 1994-2007): 1022 (Biography). On July 23, Penzel began copying out the full scores of the appropriate chorale cantatas from the parts sets in the possession of the Thomas School.

Penzel's extensive copying, presumably for performance, continued until at least 1770. They began with Cantatas BWV 178 and BWV 94, for the 8th and 9th Sundays after Trinity which in 1755 fell on August 3 and 10 respectively. Penzel is thought to have made the score copies 8-14 days prior to the Sunday performance. "He either copied or compiled in score form twenty-four of Sebastian's cantatas, seventeen of them during his time in Leipzig while he was the temporary director of the choir," says Gerhard Herz, JSB in the Age of Rationalism and Early Romanticism (translation, original 1935 dissertation), in <Essays on JSB> (Ann Arbor MI, UMI Research Press, 1985: 33), cited in William Hoffman, "Early Bach Reception History: Music Transmission Before 1800" (manuscript, 1994, p. 15).

Following Cantatas BWV 178 and BWV 94, Penzel copied out six scores for Cantatas BWV 101, BWV 113, BWV 137, BWV 33, BWV 99, and BWV 114 through the 17th Sunday after Trinity (October 5, 1755), omitting cantatas for Trinity 14 and 16 (BWV 78 and BWV 8). Penzel copied other scores in Leipzig from other sources during this time (BWV 211, BWV 126, BWV 140, BWV 133, BWV 41, BWV 125, BWV 177, BWV 129, and BWV 149, as well as BWV 150, BWV 142, BWV 62, 236, BWV 106, BWV 97, and BWV 236.

The only documented Penzel performance, from a church textbook, was for Septuagesima Chorale Cantata BWV 126, "Erhalt uns herr, bei deinem Wort" (Preserve us Lord, by thy word), for the 200th anniversary of the Augsburg Peace, Thursday, Sept. 25, 1755, at St. Thomas and St. Nicklaus churches in Leipzig.

Cantata BWV 62 and Missa BWV 236 were copied in 1761 for his unsuccessful probe to succeed his father as sexton at Oelsnitz. Finally, in 1765, he became cantor at Merseburg until his death in 1801. In 1767-70, he copied out Cantatas BWV 97, BWV 157, BWV 158, BWV 159, and BWV 25 from Friedemann Bach sources. His manuscript collection (including instrumental music) was inherited by his nephew Johann Gottlob Schuster (1765-1839), who sold most of it to Franz Hauser in 1833; the remainder was acquired by the Leipzig publisher C.F. Peters.

Linda Gingrich wrote (October 6, 2011):
< Tonal Allegory in BWV 94
The following is a summary of Eric Chafe's comments on Cantata BWV 94, "Was frag ich nach der Welt" (What do I ask from the world) [Francis Browne BCW English translation], <Tonal Allegory in the Music of JSB (University of California Press, 1991: 179-81) >
There is also evidence that Bach's use of musical allegory extends beyond Cantata 94 and links it to its surrounding cantatas, BWV 178 on the preceding Sunday (8th in Trinity season), BWV 101 on the following Sunday (10th in Trinity season), and BWV 113 on the next Sunday after that (11th Sunday). To give a few examples, BWV 178 consists of 7 movements, BWV 94 of 8 movements, BWV 101 of 7 movements, BWV 113 of 8 movements. The cantatas the precede and follow this group don't show this kind of movement pattern. The chorale melody is suddenly pervasive in the inner movements of these four cantatas, far more than the preceding cantatas show. The key relationships are also closely related, A minor in BWV 178, D major in BWV 94, D minor in BWV 101, b minor in BWV 113, all in tonic-dominant or parallel/relative major-minor relationships. The key relationships in the cantatas that precede and follow this group exhibit different relationships. It's also interesting to note that Chafe identifies tonal movement from sharps to flats as a tonal descent, and vice versa for the ascent; Cantata BWV 101 deals with judgment, certainly an emotional and spiritual descent, and BWV 113 deals with penitence, a spiritual and emotional (ultimately) ascent. It's also interesting that BWV 101 uses a summetrical structure, a chiasm, very often a cross-like symbol in Bach, making that cantata, in my opinion, the allegorical climax of this four-cantata sequence.

If any are interested, I examined the allegorical relationships between the cantatas in the 2nd-cycle Trinity season in my 2008 dissertation, and a summary was published in the August 2010 issue of the Choral Journal.

What a mind he had! He was able to create cantatas that are fine works individually, met the worship needs of the Sundays for which they were composed, and then on top of that he thought large-scale, creating groups of
cantatas! It's a feast for the mind and the soul.

Ed Myskowski wrote (October 6, 2011):
Linda Gingrich wrote:
< The chorale melody is suddenly pervasive in the inner movements of these four cantatas, far more than the preceding cantatas show. >
Thanks for a stimulating post, especially this detail. I do not recall that it was much discussed in the previous chronological round of discussions (correction invited), and it is a bit more difficult to catch as a trend in the current format. It has certainly jumped out to my ear, in relistening to the individual works this time around.

I wonder if this is so much a suddden effect, as a natural (or intentional) intensification of the relation of the chorale to the entire work?

This is a topic of special interest to Julian Mincham, worth looking at his essays again for the particular detail.

Julian Mincham wrote (October 7, 2011):
< The chorale melody is suddenly pervasive in the inner movements of these four cantatas, far more than the preceding cantatas show. >
To sustain this point you have to argue HOW the chorale is pervasively utilised. In terms of the use of complete phrases? Look at movements e.g. recits, from BWV 2, In terms of the use of motives? Look at BWV 135/1 and the pervasive use of the first chorale phrase ----and several movements from BWV 10. Bach quarried the chorale in a myriad of different ways to obtain material for other movements in the cantatas---BWV 94 was neither the first or the last to demonstrate this point. And his purpose in doing so was not always symbolic---as often it was musical, a way of unifying movements internally and the overall cantata structures across the movements.

Linda Gingrich wrote (October 7, 2011):
I wonder if this is so much a suddden effect, as a natural (or intentional) intensification of the relation of the chorale to the entire work?

Julian Mincham wrote:
< To sustain this point you have to argue HOW the chorale is pervasively utilised. In terms of the use of complete phrases? Look at movements e.g. recits, from BWV 2, In terms of the use of motives? Look at BWV 135/1 and the pervasive use of the first chorale phrase ----and several movements from BWV 10. Bach quarried the chorale in a myriad of different ways to obtain material for other movements in the cantatas---BWV 94 was neither the first or the last to demonstrate this point. And his purpose in doing so was not always symbolic---as often it was musical, a way of unifying movements internally and the overall cantata structures across the movements. >
Julian is quite right in saying that Bach quarried the chorales in many ways, and that they weren't always used symbolically. But there is also a clear change in the way he used the chorale melodies in the inner movements of this group from the preceding cantatas, and their appearance is sudden and striking, especially in their use with recitative. And they are everywhere in the inner movements, far more so than in the previous cantatas. Far too detailed to describe here, but fascinating. My hypothesis is that Bach used this as one way to bind these four cantatas together as an allegorical group, with a message--a kind of group sermon. And this is not the only cantata group he created in the Trinity season chorale cantatas. And Ed asks an interesting question. I think there may be, in some sense, an intensification in the relation of the chorale to the entire work, because after this cantata group Bach does seem to me to continue to explore the use of the chorale melodies, and sometimes the texts, but in different ways once again. They clearly spurred his creativity.

 

Continue on Part 4

Cantata BWV 94: Details & Complete Recordings | Recordings of Individual Movements
Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4

Recordings & Discussions of Cantatas: Cantatas BWV 1-50 | Cantatas BWV 51-100 | Cantatas BWV 101-150 | Cantatas BWV 151-200 | Cantatas BWV 201-224 | Cantatas BWV Anh | Order of Discussion

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