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Masaaki Suzuki & Bach Collegium Japan
Cantatas Vol. 10
Cantatas BWV 105, BWV 179, BWV 186

C-10

J.S. Bach: Cantatas Vol. 10 - Cantatas from Leipzig 1723 / III - BWV 105, 179, 186

 
 

Cantatas BWV 105 [21:23], BWV 179 [14:42], BWV 186 [26:01]

Masaaki Suzuki

Bach Collegium Japan

Soprano: Miah Persson; Counter-tenor: Robin Blaze; Tenor: Makoto Sakurada; Bass: Peter Kooy

BIS 951

Feb 1999

CD / TT: 63:12

Recorded at the Kobe Shoin Women's University Chapel, Japan.
See: Cantatas Vol. 10 - conducted by Massaki Suzuki
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Vol. 10 of Suzuki - BWV 105

Piotr Jaworski wrote (June 24, 1999):
Finally, the Vol.10 of Suzuki cantatas projects ended up in my CD player.

It might be especially interesting to Steven ("smguy") /Corno da tirarsi in the opening Chorus!/ - as previously announced it contains BWV 105 "Herr, gehe nicht ins Gericht..." (coupled with BWV 179 and BWV 186). After several listenings I should be ready to provide you with further comments - but after one - it sounds as most (or rather all!) of the previous volumes - what means SUPERB. I had some reservations that Blaze had replaced Mera, but after this record (convincingly supported by last Hyperion releases) they disappeared - and what might me the most intriguing aspect her - Blaze will be heard in the forthcoming St.M. Passion (BWV 244)!

 

Suzuki - Vol. 10

Ryan Michero wrote (August 11, 1999):
I'm back with another Suzuki review, and this time it's a big one! I'm reviewing the recently released Vol.10 of the complete cantata series. I hope everyone will find it interesting.

I should mention a couple of things before the review. First, I have instituted a comparison section in which I compare Suzuki's recording of a particular cantata with others. This might be small at first, as I can't afford to buy every existing version of a cantata. However, I am collecting Koopman's set, I plan to get the Harnoncourt/Leonhardt set when it is re-released with the Bach 2000 collection, hopefully I will get Gardiner's set as it is released, and I already have a nice smattering of cantata recordings, so hopefully my comparisons will be useful.

Also, I have started identifying the sections of the performance that really impress me with the word "Wow." This may seem a little silly, but it's just something I would scribble in my notes when I came across a really great moment. Really it's probably these moments that make certain recordings stand out in our minds, setting them apart from good but uninspired performances.

One more thing: in response to recent queries about the Suzuki series from new list members, I have included my overall thoughts about the project that preceded by first review (Vol. 2). Experienced list members can skip down to the "Volume 10" section.

Overview:

We lovers of Bach's sacred cantatas live in a very exciting time. Not only are there two "complete" recorded sets of the cantatas already finished (by Rilling on modern instruments and by Harnoncourt and Leonhardt on period instruments), but there are two more sets in progress (Koopman and Suzuki) and another coming soon (Gardiner), not to mention excellent single volumes (by Herreweghe, Juergens, and Werner, to name a few) and various "incomplete" sets (Richter) already on the market. All of these recordings offer fascinating perspectives on the inexhaustible riches of Bach's cantatas. That being said, the ongoing cantata series being recorded by Masaaki Suzuki leading the Bach Collegium Japan is my favorite; in fact, I don't hesitate to say these are most satisfying sacred cantata recordings I have ever heard.

The thought of a Japanese ensemble performing German Lutheran vocal music may make you a bit apprehensive, as it did me at first. I wondered, could they measure up to European ensembles in their feel for the German baroque idiom? In expressiveness? In polish? In their pronunciation of German texts? Despite these misgivings, I took a chance and bought one of their recordings. Not only did they silence all of my fears, but I was captivated by their rich, beautiful sound, their interpretive power, and their expressive intensity--qualities too often lacking even in the best of European ensembles.

In my opinion, this series goes from strength to strength. Suzuki is an enthralling interpreter of these works. He pierces straight to the heart of them, always sensitive to the meaning of their texts, making the most of the wide range of emotions they contain. A former student of Ton Koopman, Suzuki approaches cantata performance in much the same way; however, in my opinion he surpasses his master in interpretive insight and expressive intensity. The BCJ Choir, usually from four to eighteen singers strong, is outstanding. They can sing with expression, power, dignity, grace, and lightness when needed, and every voice is clearly audible. The vocal soloists are always reliable, often wonderful. My favorites include the boyish, expressive sopranos Midori Suzuki, Ingrid Schmithuesen, and Aki Yanagisawa, the warm-toned Counter-tenor Yoshikazu Mera, the fine tenors Gerd Tuerk and Makoto Sakurada, and the fantastic baritone Peter Kooij, who is featured on almost every volume. The period-instrument orchestra has a rich, full sound that is quite unique. It often includes distinguished soloists like Ryo Terakado (violin), Hidemi Suzuki (cello), Marcel Ponseele (oboe), Alfredo Bernardini (oboe), and Kaori Uemura (viola da gamba). These forces are always beautifully recorded in the Shoin Women's University Chapel, which imparts a heavenly reverberance without clouding the counterpoint of Bach's writing. The reverberance may be a drawback for some, but for me what is lost in clarity is made up in the richer sound. Liner notes are always thorough and illuminating, even if their English translation is a bit confusing sometimes. Usually, general notes on the recorded works are followed by notes on the details of their performance written by Suzuki himself. The notes are given in English, German, and French along with complete texts and fine English translations. Suzuki's set is great for those just getting to know the cantatas as well as those not completely satisfied with the readings of his competitors. Suzuki obviously knows and loves these works, and he brings out the best in all of them.

Volume 10

Here is another excellent volume of early Leipzig cantatas from Suzuki and the BCJ. It contains fine performances of two fine cantatas, BWV 179 and BWV 186, and a wonderful performance of one of Bach’s vocal masterpieces, BWV 105. The performers maintain the extremely high standards they have set throughout the series, so, for the collector, this one is self-recommending. Cantata lovers wilcertainly not want to pass up BWV 105, which is in my opinion the best available. Even beginners could do worse than to start their cantata collection here (for God’s sake, do start somewhere, though!).

BWV 105 - “Herr, gehe nicht ins Gericht mit deinem Knecht”
As Bach was particularly inspired in writing this cantata, Suzuki and the BCJ are particularly inspired in performing it. The textures of the opening chorus are very well caught, with anguished harmonies and suspensions making their full impact thanks to the expressive playing of the BCJ orchestra. Suzuki is particularly adept at shaping fugues, and here he doesn’t disappoint. The choral singing is fantastic, and the final cadence is chill-inducing (a WOW! moment). Robin Blaze expressively declaims the ensuing recitative. A gorgeous aria for trembling strings, a plaintive oboe, and soprano follows. It has to be one of my favourite Bach arias--I find it hard to describe this music without gushing. Soprano Miah Persson makes her first appearance in this series with this aria, and one could hardly ask for a more lovely, emotionally truthful, and technically sound performance. Persson jumps to the top of my list of sopranos in this series, and I look forward to hearing more of her. Also of note is the gorgeous oboe playing of Masamitsu San’nomiya. Suzuki handles the next accompanied recitative wonderfully, bringing out the symbolism of the writing without resorting to mannered over-emphasis. Kooij is predictably touching here. The next aria is scored for tenor soloist, strings, and an instrument Bach simply called “corno.” There are problems playing this on the natural horn, and most conductors opt to use a cornetto instead. Suzuki and brass player Toshio Shimada, taking Bach at his word, have decided to use a horn with a slide, a “corno da tirarsi,” specially made for this recording. It really sounds wonderful, and, with such a persuasive performance, it seems to me the best solution. Makoto Sakurada, one of the more underrated singers in this series, makes a fine impression here. Suzuki sets a dancing tempo, and while it is certainly infectious and enjoyable, it tends to make the violin runs sound a bit rushed. Bach’s final chorale setting, with its agitated strings slowly drifting off to a peaceful sleep, is a masterstroke, brilliantly mirroring the emotional progression of the entire piece. And this performance of it is truly affecting, with the final violin line, pianissimo, slowly fading to silence. It’s the kind of moment that makes you want to stop the CD and let the music sink in. Wow, indeed.

BWV 179 - “Siehe zu, dass deine Gottesfuercht nicht Heuchelei sei”
Well, I can’t be quite as enthusiastic about this cantata, as the grim, admonitory text about Christian hypocrisy is off-putting. However, the music is wonderful, and Suzuki and the BCJ make a good case for it. The opening, motet-like double-fugue is wonderfully performed, with clear, finely shaded vocal lines and excellent, responsive choral singing. Suzuki sure has a way with fugues; perhaps it’s because of his training as an organist. After a nicely-sung tenor recitative, there is an intense, admonitory tenor aria. The string players really attack their high-lying melodic line, Suzuki swings the rhythm irresistibly, and Sakurada captures the tortured emotions of this movement wonderfully. There is another grim recitative, nicely sung by Kooij. The next aria, for soprano and two oboes da caccia, is characterised in the notes as a “pitiful prayer.” Persson impresses again, sounding very much the vulnerable, penitent sinner, and the oboes sound great. The final chorale is sensitively shaped and beautifully sung, with tortured harmonies and the choral cries of “Erbarme dich” making their proper impact.

BWV 186 - “Ärgre dich, o Seele, nicht”
This two-part cantata, a Weimar piece with recitatives pasted in for the Leipzig performance, doesn’t quite cohere as a whole. That said, there are some wonderful moments, and Suzuki makes the most of them. The opening chorus, with a fine orchestral sound and intense choral singing, sounds great in these performers’ hands. The following bass recitative, like all of the recitatives here, has an Arioso section, the first in the form of a lament. Kooij sings it nicely, as he does the next aria. The next piece, a tenor recitative, is again nicely sung, with another affecting slow Arioso section. In the following tenor aria, the orchestra, complete with oboes da caccia, sounds marvellous, and Suzuki’s rhythms skip along nicely. I really like the chorale setting that ends both parts of this cantata, as in BWV 147, “Herz und Mund...” The violins and oboes alternate melodic figures in a very Bachian manner, and they sound great here. The second part opens with a bass recitative with a majestic, powerful ending, and Kooy impresses again. The following aria is expressively sung by Persson, with Suzuki coaxing eloquent, finely shaded violin playing from the BCJ orchestra. Blaze has another recitative here, which he dispatches nicely. The high point of this cantata is the following alto/soprano duet. This great Bachian concoction has an infectious 3/8 dance rhythm, a lovely string melody, and two closely harmonised vocal lines. The voices of Robin Blaze and Miah Persson blend marvellously, sounding fantastic together. Really, I cannot imagine this piece sounding better than it does here. A return of the first part’s final chorale brings this work to a satisfying close.

Comparisons

BWV 105--Herreweghe, Harnoncourt, Koopman
Herreweghe is a formidable competitor in BWV 105: he sensitively leads a great chorus, excellent soloists, and a fine period orchestra in a wonderful performance. I especially like the plangent oboes in the opening chorus, and it’s nice to hear Barbara Schlick’s distinctive voice in the lovely soprano aria as well. What disqualifies Herreweghe from a recommendation for me, though, is his choice to ignore Bach’s marking of “corno” in the tenor aria, instead assigning the line to a quiet solo oboe. The CD booklet makes no mention of this dubious substitution.

Koopman’s version is good, but not especially distinguished in my opinion. The choral sound is great, but the orchestra sounds a bit too polished for my taste. I prefer other soloists as well. He opts to use a cornet in the tenor aria, and it sounds fine.

I was surprised by how much I liked Harnoncourt’s 1980 recording, which made me want to hear more of the Harnoncourt/Leonhardt complete cantata cycle. The choral singing, with boy sopranos and altos, lacks polish, but the performance is otherwise fine and often reveals hidden expressive riches in Bach’s music. The sound of the Concentus Musicus Wien is rich with a spicing of astringency. I especially admired the fluent violin of Alice Harnoncourt and the touching, expressive oboe of Jurg Schaeftlein. Boy soprano Wilhelm Wiedl sings his aria very nicely. Harnoncourt also uses a cornet for the tenor aria. His performance is a fine alternative to Suzuki’s.

BWV 179, BWV 186--Koopman
For both of these cantatas, the versions of Koopman and Suzuki are, in matters of interpretation and overall sound, very comparable, and it is hard to recommend one over the other. I tend to favour Koopman’s tenor and bass soloists, Gerd Türk (who often sings with Suzuki) and Klaus Mertens, and Suzuki’s soprano and alto soloists. I call a draw for BWV 179. However, I recommend the Suzuki in BWV 186 because his soloists pull off the final duet much better than Koopman’s.

 

Suzuki Vol. 10/Cantata 105

Ehud Shiloni wrote (August 12, 1999):
[To Ryan Michero] Thanks for such an inspirational post - makes the anticipation for this CD so much sweeter..

About the "comparison" section, I wonder if you are in a position to throw-in Rilling versioas well. I dont have the Rilling CD, but I saw the following "superlative" in a recent post to the Bach Page:

Quote
Sometimes one comes across what one feels is truly a "definitive" interpretation; such is the case, for me, with the Arleen Augér performance, under Rilling, of the extraordinary aria "Wie zittern und wanken," no. 3 in BWV 105, the cantata "Herr, Gehe nicht ins Gericht"
Alan M. Kriegsman
Unquote

In any case, I agree with your definition of BWV 105 as a masterpiece.

Ryan Michero wrote (August 12, 1999):
Ehud Shiloni wrote:
< Thanks for such an inspirational post - makes the anticipation for this CD so much sweeter.. I'm glad you liked it! I don't think my writing has ever been called "inspirational." Perhaps it's just my enthusiasm for Bach... About the "comparison" section, I wonder if you are in a position to throw-in Rilling version as well. >
I am not now, but I will think about it. Of course, the comparison section will be growing as I buy more recordings. Perhaps I will post my reviews on a website and continually update it. I don't have plans as of yet to get the Rilling cantata set because I have not been too impressed with the recordings I have heard. It also makes sense to me to limit my comparisons to HIP performances, so as not to end up writing a Penguin Guide-sized tome and also simply because I enjoy listening to them more than modern-instrument versions.

However, I am still thinking about it. I am certainly not opposed to modern-instruments, and I'm sure many of Rilling's cantata performances are excellent.

Perhaps someone can recommend a single-disc Rilling volume to convert me to his cause? Maybe I should try the volume with BWV 105, a work I have become very familiar with as of late...

 

Suzuki's Bach Continues

Donald Satz wrote (November 9, 1999):
It took far too long for me to acquire Vol.10 of the Suzuki/Bach cantata series on BIS, but the wait was well worth it. The three cantatas on the disc, BWV 105, BWV 179, and BWV 186, were composed By Bach in his first year at Leipzig. BWV 105 is one of my favourite cantatas - two outstanding arias framed by beautiful choral pieces. BWV 186 is one of Bach's better works, although BWV 179 is a little less stirring.

I think that Suzuki and his Bach Collegium Japan really hit their stride with this volume. The orchestral contributions are sterling with great pacing and dramatic unfolding. Recorded sound is close to perfect.

My only reservation, one that seems to be consistent in this series, concerns the vocal soloists: Miah Persson (soprano), Robin Blaze (alto), Makoto Sakurada (tenor), and Peter Kooy (bass). Each one is acceptable with Kooy substantially better than the others who just did not display vocal beauty in abundance. They did not detract from the performances however.

Overall, those who have been collecting the Suzuki volumes will be very pleased with Vol.10 - I was. I don't think that anyone has directed these cantatas better than Suzuki. An upgrading of the vocal soloists would easily place this disc in the must-buy category. As it is, Vol.10 is very worthy of purchase.

Simon Crouch wrote (November 10, 1999):
Donald Satz wrote:
< It took far too long for me to acquire volume 10 of the Suzuki/Bach cantata series on BIS, but the wait was well worth it. ... I think that Suzuki and his Bach Collegium Japan really hit their stride with this volume. The orchestral contributions are sterling with great pacing and dramatic unfolding. Recorded sound is close to perfect. >
An unreserved seconding for this recommendation from me. I was persuaded by the folks over on the Bach Recordings list to start collecting this series (in addition to the complete Rilling and Harnoncourt/Leonhardt sets that I already have) and am very glad I took their advice. The series has been very fine in general, and this volume is one of the stand-outs.

< My only reservation, one that seems to be consistent in this series, concerns the vocal soloists: Miah Persson (soprano), Robin Blaze (alto), Makoto Sakurada (tenor), and Peter Kooij (bass). Each one is acceptable with Kooij substantially better than the others who just did not display vocal beauty in abundance. They did not detract from the performances however. >
Funny, I don't share this reservation. I've always felt that for many, many Bach vocal recordings it's been the vocal soloists that have always been liable to be the week links - with faults ranging from unsteady intonation through to frequent over-casting. Suzuki, to my ears, has consistently chosen very fine young soloists with voices ideally suited to the music. I'd identify Peter Kooy as being the vocal rock of this series - Suzuki has really let him rip in this series whereas for other conductors he seems to have been kept on a leash!

Donald Satz wrote (November 11, 1999):
Simon Crouch wrote in response to my reservations about the vocal soloists on volume 10 of the BIS cantata series:
< Funny, I don't share this reservation.... Suzuki, to my ears, has consistently chosen very fine young soloists with voices ideally suited to the music. >
I didn't provide any details concerning my reservations, but I'd be interested in Simon's opinion of the soprano, Miah Persson. I found her voice to be a "small" one that virtually disappeared now and then. Also, I didn't discern any beauty in her voice. So, it was a pleasant and weak voice. Where's Emma Kirby?

Simon Crouch wrote (November 13, 1999):
[To Donald Satz] I had another good listen this morning to Volume 10. Persson strikes me as a good example of the sensible artistic choices that Suzuki is making. She has a well controlled, pure voice and enough artistic sensibility to add ornament at the right place and with the right technical control. She uses vibrato as an ornamant (which gets her top marks as far as I'm concerned!) and her voice balances well with the instrumental lines. Perhaps Suzuki has placed her a tad far back in the mix in "Wie zittern und wanken" in BWV 105 but since this is a duet with the oboe it's a valid artistic choice (and far preferable to having it treated like Wagner). In her duet with Blaze in BWV 186 her voice is perfectly balanced with his. If I was to find one criticism against Persson, it's that she doesn't alter the dynamic much on long held notes - but this may be a deliberate artistic choice on her or Suzuki's behalf.

I did a comparison with Schlick for Herreweghe in BWV 105. Her voice is bigger and her performance tasteful, but I find the "always-on" vibrato a serious fault. Perrson wins this one for me.

Donald Satz wrote (November 13, 1999):
Simon Crouch wrote concerning the soprano Miah Persson:
< Persson strikes me as a good example of the sensible artistic choices that Suzuki is making. She has a well controlled, pure voice and enough artistic sensibility to add ornament at the right place and with the right technical control.... I did a comparison with Schlick for Herreweghe in BWV 105. Her voice is bigger and her performance tasteful, but I find the "always-on" vibrato a serious fault. Perrson wins this one for me. >
Persson wins for me also, but Schlick is a singer I have problems with. Her voice, in addition to providing too much vibrato, always sounds to me as if it is going to collapse. Actually, I find both voices similar in "color" and think that many other sopranos in Baroque music are better (not interpretatively, but in pure tone).

These are my subjective observations. Schlick has a fine reputation, and Persson is developing one. There are all types of singers for all tastes. I do want to emphasize again that Persson did not detract from my enjoyment of the disc one bit - just didn't add anything.

Aaron J. Rabushka wrote (November 15, 1999):
A vfinely performed disc of Bach cantatas that I found recently is the Cantatas for Alto disc from Harmonia Mundi-France. It features Philippe Herreweghe conducting and countertenor Andreas Scholl singing. The performances are excellent--my only gripe is that Scholl's voice sometimes comes across as retiring rather than assertive. His singing is very secure and stylish, and the instrumental group (whose name escapes me now) performs likewise. Several of these cantatas feature some persuasively well-played organ obbligati. This is not presented as part of Herreweghe's Bach cantata series, but it's the best of the ones I've yet heard from him.

Donald Satz wrote (November 15, 1999):
Aaron Rabushka wrote:
< A very fine performed disc of Bach cantatas that I found recently is the Cantatas for Alto disc from Harmonia Mundi - France. It features Philippe Herreweghe conducting and countertenor Andreas Scholl singing. The performances are excellent--my only gripe is that Scholl's voice sometimes comes across as retiring rather than assertive. >
Aaron has picked out a great Bach cantata disc. You can't do much better than Bach/Herreweghe/Scholl. I didn't notice any retiring aspects to Scholl's singing on the disc, but since I've been thinking of retiring myself, I probably wouldn't have noticed. Let's all retire and get out of this rat race.

 

Suzuki - Vol. 10

Patrik Enander wrote (April 11, 2000):
Before going to bed I thought I should finish with listening to a Bach cantata I just picked Vol.10 in Suzuki's series. I haven't listened that much to it. I listened to BWV 105 Herr, Gehe nicht in Gericht. I was bowled over and so inspired that I had to tell my Bach-loving friends all over the world. It is a lovely performance. The choir sings beautifully, the orchestra sounds light and transparent. Robin Blaze is superb in his small recitative, I came to regret the somewhat derogatory things I said about him when I compared BWV 21. The soprano Miah Persson, a fellow Swede!, sings beautifully, but the best part is Peter Kooy (I refuse to call him Kooij) in the bass recitative. It is delicate, low-keyed and so very beautiful. The only letdown is the cheerful tenor aria. I cannot say I enjoyed the melody that much, it is too jumpy in Suzuki's interpretation and Sakurada is not up to his usual high standards. In this cantata Suzuki is to be preferred to Herreweghe with the exception of the tenor aria, on Herreweghe sung by Howard Crook. His singing is better and it is played somewhat slower and is much more expressive.

So listen and enjoy!

Ryan Michero wrote (April 11, 2000):
[To Patrick Enander] I agree that this is a wonderful performance, the highlight of a great CD--one of Suzuki's best. I wrote a review of the volume when it was first released and this is what I said about BWV 105:

"As Bach was particularly inspired in writing this cantata, Suzuki and the BCJ are particularly inspired in performing it. The textures of the opening chorus are very well caught, with anguished harmonies and suspensions making their full impact thanks to the expressive playing of the BCJ orchestra. Suzuki is particularly adept at shaping fugues, and here he doesn't disappoint. The choral singing is fantastic, and the final cadence is chill-inducing (a WOW! moment). Robin Blaze expressively declaims the ensuing recitative. A gorgeous aria for trembling strings, a plaintive oboe, and soprano follows. It has to be one of my favourite Bach arias--I find it hard to describe this music without gushing. Soprano Miah Persson makes her first appearance in this series with this aria, and one could hardly ask for a more lovely, emotionally truthful, and technically sound performance. Persson jumps to the top of my list of sopranos in this series, and I look forward to hearing more of her. Also of note is the gorgeous oboe playing of Masamitsu San'nomiya. Suzuki handles the next accompanied recitative wonderfully, bringing out the symbolism of the writing without resorting to mannered over-emphasis. Kooij is predictably touching here. The next aria is scored for tenor soloist, strings, and an instrument Bach simply called "corno." There are problems playing this on the natural horn, and most conductors opt to use a cornetto instead. Suzuki and brass player Toshio Shimada, taking Bach at his word, have decided to use a horn with a slide, a "corno da tirarsi," specially made for this recording. It really sounds wonderful, and, with such a persuasive performance, it seems to me the best solution. Makoto Sakurada, one of the more underrated singers in this series, makes a fine impression here. Suzuki sets a dancing tempo, and while it is certainly infectious and enjoyable, it tends to make the violin runs sound a bit rushed. Bach's final chorale setting, with its agitated strings slowly drifting off to a peaceful sleep, is a masterstroke, brilliantly mirroring the emotional progression of the entire piece. And this performance of it is truly affecting, with the final violin line, pianissimo, slowly fading to silence. It's the kind of moment that makes you want to stop the CD and let the music sink in. Wow, indeed."

Here's what I said about the competitors:

"Herreweghe is a formidable competitor in BWV 105: he sensitively leads a great chorus, excellent soloists, and a fine period orchestra in a wonderful performance. I especially like the plangent oboes in the opening chorus, and it's nice to hear Barbara Schlick's distinctive voice in the lovely soprano aria as well. What disqualifies Herreweghe from a recommendation for me, though, is his choice to ignore Bach's marking of "corno" in the tenor aria, instead assigning the line to a quiet solo oboe. The CD booklet makes no mention of this dubious substitution.

Koopman's version is good, but not especially distinguished in my opinion. The choral sound is great, but the orchestra sounds a bit too polished for my taste. I prefer other soloists as well. He opts to use a cornet in the tenor aria, and it sounds fine.

I was surprised by how much I liked Harnoncourt's 1980 recording, which made me want to hear more of the Harnoncourt/Leonhardt complete cantata cycle. The choral singing, with boy sopranos and altos, lacks polish, but the performance is otherwise fine and often reveals hidden expressive riches in Bach's music. The sound of the Concentus Musicus Wien is rich with a spicing of astringency. I especially admired the fluent violin of Alice Harnoncourt and the touching, expressive oboe of Jurg Schäftlein. Boy soprano Wilhelm Wiedl sings his aria very nicely. Harnoncourt also uses a cornet for the tenor aria. His performance is a fine alternative to Suzuki's."

So, I agree with you on almost every point. I recall upon reading your post that I liked Herreweghe's tempo for the tenor aria a bit better than Suzuki's, but I think Suzuki's use of the "corno da tirarsi" is a better choice than Herreweghe's oboe. I have no preference between Crook and Sakurada--both are great in my opinion. So, like you, I conclude that Suzuki is tops for this particular cantata.

What a cantata, too! The soprano aria gets me every time.

 

Masaaki Suzuki: Short Biography | Bach Collegoim Japan
Recordings of Vocal Works:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4 | Part 5 | Recordings of Instrumental Works
General Discussions:
Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 | Part 4
Cantatas:
Suzuki - Vol. 2 | Suzuki - Vol. 5 | Suzuki - Vol. 8 | Suzuki - Vol. 9 | Suzuki - Vol. 10 | Suzuki - Vol. 11 | Suzuki - Vol. 12 | Suzuki - Vol. 13 | Suzuki - Vol. 14 | Suzuki - Vol. 15 | Suzuki - Vol. 16 | Suzuki - Vol. 17 | Suzuki - Vol. 18 | Suzuki - Vol. 19 | Suzuki - Vol. 20 | Suzuki - Vol. 21 | Suzuki - Vol. 22 | Suzuki - Vol. 23 | Suzuki - Vol. 24 | Suzuki - Vol. 25 | Suzuki - Vol. 26 | Suzuki - Vol.. 27 | Suzuki - Vol. 28 | Suzuki - Vol. 29 | Suzuki - Vol. 30 | Suzuki - Vol. 31 | Suzuki - Vol. 38 | Suzuki Secular - Vol. 1
Other Vocal Works:
BWV 232 - M. Suzuki | BWV 243 - M. Suzuki | BWV 244 - M. Suzuki | BWV 245 - M. Suzuki | BWV 248 - M. Suzuki
Reviews of Instrumental Recordings:
Bach’s Clavier-Ubung III from Masaaki Suzuki | Bach Harpsichord Discs from Hill and Suzuki | Bach’s French Suites from Suzuki | Review: Partitas by Suzuki [McElhearn] | Suzuki’s Partitas [Henderson] | Suzuki’s Goldberg Variations
Discussions of Instrumental Recordings:
Partitas BWV 825-830 - played by M. Suzuki
Table of recordings by BWV Number

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